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How to Write an English Sonnet Sonnet 18, William Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate Rough winds.

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Presentation on theme: "How to Write an English Sonnet Sonnet 18, William Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate Rough winds."— Presentation transcript:

1 How to Write an English Sonnet Sonnet 18, William Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May And summer's lease hath all too short a date Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines And often is his gold complexion dimm'd And every fair from fair sometime declines By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade When in eternal lines to time thou growest So long as men can breathe or eyes can see So long lives this and this gives life to thee. Useful terminology: Stanza Rhyme scheme Quatrain Couplet Syllables The Foot Iamb Pentameter

2 What is a Stanza? Stanza In poetry, stanza refers to a grouping of lines, set off by a space, that usually has a set pattern of meter and rhyme. See also line, meter, rhyme. Sonnet 18, William Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May And summer's lease hath all too short a date Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines And often is his gold complexion dimm'd And every fair from fair sometime declines By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade When in eternal lines to time thou growest So long as men can breathe or eyes can see So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

3 The Proper Rhyme Scheme? English (Shakespearian) Sonnet: Rhyme Scheme abab/cdcd/efef/gg Sonnet 18, William Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May And summer's lease hath all too short a date Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines And often is his gold complexion dimm'd And every fair from fair sometime declines By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade When in eternal lines to time thou growest So long as men can breathe or eyes can see So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

4 Quatrain A Sonnet has 3 quatrains A four-line stanza Sonnet 18, William Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May And summer's lease hath all too short a date Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines And often is his gold complexion dimm'd And every fair from fair sometime declines By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade When in eternal lines to time thou growest So long as men can breathe or eyes can see So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

5 What is a Couplet? Couplet A Sonnet has 1 couplet Two consecutive lines of poetry that usually rhyme and have the same meter. Sonnet 18, William Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May And summer's lease hath all too short a date Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines And often is his gold complexion dimm'd And every fair from fair sometime declines By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade When in eternal lines to time thou growest So long as men can breathe or eyes can see So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

6 Syllables? Syllables Shall I com-pare thee to a sum-er´s day = 10 syllables Sonnet 18, William Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May And summer's lease hath all too short a date Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines And often is his gold complexion dimm'd And every fair from fair sometime declines By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade When in eternal lines to time thou growest So long as men can breathe or eyes can see So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

7 Foot The metrical unit by which a line of poetry is measured. A foot usually consists of one stressed and one or two unstressed syllables. An iambic foot, which consists of one unstressed syllable followed by one stressed syllable ("away"), is the most common metrical foot in English poetry. A trochaic foot consists of one stressed syllable followed by an unstressed syllable ("lovely"). An anapestic foot is two unstressed syllables followed by one stressed one ("understand"). A dactylic foot is one stressed syllable followed by two unstressed ones ("desperate"). A spondee is a foot consisting of two stressed syllables ("dead set"), but is not a sustained metrical foot and is used mainly for variety or emphasis. See also iambic pentameter, line, meter. Sonnet 18, William Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May And summer's lease hath all too short a date Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines And often is his gold complexion dimm'd And every fair from fair sometime declines By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade When in eternal lines to time thou growest So long as men can breathe or eyes can see So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

8 Iamb? An iamb, or iambic foot, consists of one unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable.) Sonnet 18, William Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May And summer's lease hath all too short a date Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines And often is his gold complexion dimm'd And every fair from fair sometime declines By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade When in eternal lines to time thou growest So long as men can breathe or eyes can see So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

9 Iambic Pentameter? _pentameter _pentameter

10 _pentameter _pentameter


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