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The Anatomy of a Shakespearean Sonnet - mouse over each part of the sonnet to learn more about its structure. Sonnet 18 by Shakespeare Shall I compare.

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Presentation on theme: "The Anatomy of a Shakespearean Sonnet - mouse over each part of the sonnet to learn more about its structure. Sonnet 18 by Shakespeare Shall I compare."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Anatomy of a Shakespearean Sonnet - mouse over each part of the sonnet to learn more about its structure. Sonnet 18 by Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

2 The Anatomy of a Shakespearean Sonnet - mouse over each part of the sonnet to learn more about its structure. Sonnet 18 by Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. This is the first quatrain. Note the rhyme scheme: ABAB. The speaker is introducing the topic, usually a metaphor, in these lines.

3 The Anatomy of a Shakespearean Sonnet - mouse over each part of the sonnet to learn more about its structure. Sonnet 18 by Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. In the second quatrain, the rhyme scheme is CDCD. The speaker continues his comparison.

4 The Anatomy of a Shakespearean Sonnet - mouse over each part of the sonnet to learn more about its structure. Sonnet 18 by Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. In the third quatrain, the rhyme scheme is EFEF. The comparison is further developed.

5 The Anatomy of a Shakespearean Sonnet - mouse over each part of the sonnet to learn more about its structure. Sonnet 18 by Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. The final lines are called a couplet (or the turn) and summarizes or offers a new perspective on the comparison. The rhyme scheme is GG.

6 The Anatomy of a Shakespearean Sonnet - mouse over each part of the sonnet to learn more about its structure. Sonnet 18 by Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. Shakespeare’s sonnets are numbered, and are often referred to by their first lines. So Sonnet 18 can also be referred to by saying “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?”

7 The Anatomy of a Shakespearean Sonnet - mouse over each part of the sonnet to learn more about its structure. Sonnet 18 by Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. Sonnets are written in iambic pentameter, which means every other syllable is stressed (think: I AM a PIRate WITH a WOODen LEG!).


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