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Rap with Shakspeare Take notes on Shakespeare’s sonnets. As we take notes, we will also annotate Shakespeare’s most famous sonnet, Sonnet 18.

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Presentation on theme: "Rap with Shakspeare Take notes on Shakespeare’s sonnets. As we take notes, we will also annotate Shakespeare’s most famous sonnet, Sonnet 18."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Rap with Shakspeare Take notes on Shakespeare’s sonnets. As we take notes, we will also annotate Shakespeare’s most famous sonnet, Sonnet 18.

3 Shakespeare’s Sonnets Shakespeare's Sonnets The Sonnets are Shakespeare's most popular works They are the most widely-read poems in all of English literature. There are 154 in total. The 3 most significant are: –Sonnet 18: Shall I compare thee to a summer's day –Sonnet 116: Let me not to the marriage of true minds –Sonnet 73: That time of year thou mayst in me behold

4 Background Information Shakespeare’s sonnets were dedicated to a W. H., whose identity remains a mystery Theorists believe it may have been William Herbert, the Earl of Pembroke

5 Narrative of the Sonnets The majority of the sonnets focus on an intense romantic relationship and some of the following themes: –The value of marriage and children –The power of poetry and language –The power of love to defeat death

6 Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

7 Narrative of the Sonnets, Continued The final sonnets ( ) change tone and focus on a promiscuous woman known to modern readers as the dark lady. The themes shift to the following: –Sensual Feasting –Uncontrollable Urges –Sinful Consumption

8 Elements Elements of a Shakespearean Sonnet The Parts: –Fourteen-Line Poem –Written in Iambic Pentameter

9 Defining Iambic Pentameter Defining Iambic Pentameter: Iambic Pentameter has the following: –Ten syllables in each line –Five pairs of alternating unstressed and stressed syllables –The rhythm in each line sounds like: ba-BUM / ba-BUM / ba-BUM / ba-BUM / ba-BUM

10 Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this and this gives life to thee

11 Elements, Continued Elements of a Shakespearean Sonnet The Parts: –Fourteen-Line Poem –Written in Iambic Pentameter –Divided into Four Sections: Three quatrains (groups of four lines) Followed by a couplet of two lines.

12 Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this and this gives life to thee COUPLET Quatrain

13 Rhyme Scheme Defining Rhyme Scheme A regular pattern of rhyme, one that is consistent throughout the extent of the poem. Rhyme schemes are labeled according to their rhyme sounds. Every rhyme sound is given its own letter of the alphabet to distinguish it from the other rhyme sounds that may appear in the poem. For example, the first rhyme sound of a poem is designated as a. Every time that rhyme sound appears in the poem, no matter where it is found, it is called a. The second rhyme sound to appear in the poem is designated b. Every other time that rhyme sound appears in the poem, no matter where it is found, it is called b. The third rhyme sound to appear would be c, the fourth d, and so on, for as many rhyme sounds as appear in the poem. The following short poem illustrates the labeling of a rhyme scheme. There once was a big brown cat a That liked to eat a lot of mice. b He got all round and fat a Because they tasted so nice. b

14 Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this and this gives life to thee COUPLET Quatrain A A B B Every rhyme sound is given its own letter of the alphabet to distinguish it from the other rhyme sounds that may appear in the poem.

15 Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this and this gives life to thee COUPLET Quatrain A A B B Every rhyme sound is given its own letter of the alphabet to distinguish it from the other rhyme sounds that may appear in the poem.

16 Shakespeare vs. Paraphrase! Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Can I compare you to a summer’s day? You are more lovely and don’t change like summer: Rough Winds knock off the pretty flowers of May And summer doesn’t last long:

17 Rap with Shakspeare Take notes on Shakespeare’s sonnets. As we take notes, we will also annotate Shakespeare’s most famous sonnet, Sonnet 18. Now try to see if you can put Shakespeare’s word into your own

18 Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this and this gives life to thee

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20 Rapper’s Delight: A Sonnet ON YOUR OWN!

21 Directions Complete the following for a Shakespearean sonnet: -Paraphrase your given Sonnet… -Then, create your own rap version of that sonnet: –Alternating Rhyme Scheme (except for the ending couplet) –3 Quatrains and a couplet –10 syllables per line (ouch!)


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