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Ad Hominem- Poisoning the Well Sydney Collier and Shelby Wood.

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Presentation on theme: "Ad Hominem- Poisoning the Well Sydney Collier and Shelby Wood."— Presentation transcript:

1 Ad Hominem- Poisoning the Well Sydney Collier and Shelby Wood

2 Definition A fallacy in which one attacks the characteristics or beliefs of the person, rather than the claim the person represents. Kirke, Michael. “A bad case of double think and double standards.” Image. Conjugality. New Media Foundation Ltd, 2 Jan Web. 21 Feb 2013.

3 Universal Example Adolf Hitler: This is an irresponsible fiscal policy because the budget deficit is too great. Politician: I won’t listen to you! You’re Hitler! This is an example of Ad Hominem because the politician refuses to listen to Hitler’s stance on this policy, he is just attacking Hitler’s character. “Direct Ad Hominem.” tvtropes. TV Tropes Foundation, LLC, n.d. Web. 20 Feb

4 Universal Example Bob: This bill will be expensive and will not work, therefore you should vote against it. Alice: Bob is employed by a company which stands to lose money from this bill, therefore Bob will lose money and perhaps his job if this bill passes. Of course he would oppose it. This is an example of Ad Hominem because Alice isn’t listening to Bob’s argument about why the bill won’t work, she is attacking his job. “Circumstantial Ad Hominem.” tvtropes. TV Tropes Foundation, LLC, n.d. Web. 20 Feb

5 The Crucible Examples “Abigail, is there any other cause than you have told me, for your being discharged from Goody Procter’s service? I have heard it said, and I tell you as I heard it, that she comes so rarely to the church this year for she will not sit so close to something soiled. What signified that remark?” Reverend Parris, Act 1, Page 171 This is an Ad Hominem fallacy because Reverend Parris knows that Abigail will ruin his reputation with these witchcraft accusations, so he starts questioning her about why Goody Procter fired her instead of listening to her explanation about why she was dancing in the woods. Miller, Arthur. The Crucible. McDougal Littell Inc., Print.

6 “He plow on Sunday, sir.” Cheever, Act 3, Page 211 This is an Ad Hominem fallacy because John Proctor is trying to convince the court that this witchcraft business is all just a joke, but Cheever starts yelling about how John plows on Sunday, so you can’t believe what he says. Miller, Arthur. The Crucible. McDougal Littell Inc., Print. The Crucible Examples


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