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By Madison Kerley and Rachel Haynes.  Presenting the argument in such a way that makes the argument look ridiculous, usually by misrepresenting the argument.

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Presentation on theme: "By Madison Kerley and Rachel Haynes.  Presenting the argument in such a way that makes the argument look ridiculous, usually by misrepresenting the argument."— Presentation transcript:

1 By Madison Kerley and Rachel Haynes

2  Presenting the argument in such a way that makes the argument look ridiculous, usually by misrepresenting the argument or the use or exaggeration.  Form:  Person 1 claims that X (some statement) is true.  Person 2 makes X look ridiculous by misrepresenting X.  Therefore, X is false.

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4 This picture juxtaposes a quote that Obama said about abortion with a picture of a baby in order to make Obama’s argument for abortion appear more ridiculous.

5  “Those crazy conservatives! They think a strong military is the key to peace! Such fools!”  This is an example of Appeal to Ridicule because the person is saying that conservatives are “crazy” for wanting a strong military to protect us. This person believes that having a strong military is nonsensical, so s/he is mocking conservatives for believing that we should have a strong military. This follows the fallacy’s form by saying that conservatives are crazy, then by over exaggerating the fact that conservatives believe in a strong military, and then by restating the fact that conservatives are “fools.”

6  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dX_1B0 w7Hzc –Obama vs. Romney Rap Battle (play only through the first round) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dX_1B0 w7Hzc  This is an example of Appeal to Ridicule because both “candidates” misrepresent one another in order to win the battle. For example, Romney claims that Obama has “done nothing about” the economy, which is obviously false due to the stimulus package that Obama passed. Obama also mocks Romney by alluding to Romney’s quote about 47% of American people being dependent on the government. Obama over exaggerates the quote by just stating a percentage so that people may look it up.

7  Appeal to Ridicule  John Proctor  Act 1 page 181: “To live in, yes. But to ask ownership is like you shall own the meeting house itself; the last meeting I were at you spoke so long on deeds and mortgages I thought it were an auction.”  Puritans believe that a pastor is in place to preach God’s word, not to worry about owning a house or money. However, Proctor is over exaggerating how much Reverend Parris speaks about deeds and mortgages by stating that it feels like being at an auction.

8  Appeal to Ridicule  John Proctor  Act 2 page 198 “Since we built the church there were pewter candlesticks upon the altar; Francis Nurse made them, y’know, and a sweeter hand never touched the metal. But Paris came, and for twenty week he preach nothin’ but golden candlesticks until he had them. I labor the earth from dawn of the day to blink of night, and I tell you true, when I look to heaven and see my money glaring at his elbows-it hurt my prayer, sir, it hurt my prayer. I think, sometimes, the man dreams cathedrals, not clapboard meetin’ houses.”  Proctor is over exaggerating the fact that Parris had golden

9  candlesticks made by stating that Parris “dreams cathedrals.” This makes Parris look like he is trying to re- create the Catholic cathedrals and excessive decoration that the Puritans wish to get away from. Proctor also states that the candlesticks hurt his prayers, therefore somewhat justifying the fact that Proctor doesn’t go to church often by attributing it to the atmosphere of the church and the many decorations within the church.

10  Appeal to Ridicule  Danforth  Act 3 page 214 “Oh, is it a proper lawyer! Do you wish me to declare the court in full session here? Or will you give me good reply?”  Giles will not confess to Danforth, and then jokes saying he cannot be held in contempt of court since it is not in session. Danforth then mocks Giles, “Oh, is it a proper lawyer!” Everyone in the court (and town) know that Giles is not an actual lawyer. Danforth uses this ridiculous remark to make Giles seems incapable of sharing and testifying in a court.

11  Appeal to Ridicule  John Proctor  Act 3 page 217 “There might also be a dragon with five legs in my house, but no one has ever seen it.”  This is an example of Appeal to Ridicule because Proctor is using the ridiculous example of a dragon with five legs in his house, when everyone knows that is very unlikely.

12  Miller, Arthur. The Crucible. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, Print.  Bennett, Bo. "Appeal to Ridicule." Appeal to Ridicule. Archieboy Holdings, LLC, Web. 21 Feb  "Fallacy: Appeal to Ridicule." The Nizkor Project. N.p., Web. 25 Feb  LaBossiere, Dr. Michael C. "A Fallacy Recognition Handbook." Appeal to Ridicule. N.p., Web. 06 Mar  "Barack Obama vs Mitt Romney. Epic Rap Battles Of History Season 2." YouTube. YouTube, 15 Oct Web. 06 Mar  "Arguments From The Heart." N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Mar. 2013


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