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Amateur Rocketry Certification Levels 1 and 2 Bronco Institute of Rocket Development California Polytechnic Institute Pomona.

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Presentation on theme: "Amateur Rocketry Certification Levels 1 and 2 Bronco Institute of Rocket Development California Polytechnic Institute Pomona."— Presentation transcript:

1 Amateur Rocketry Certification Levels 1 and 2 Bronco Institute of Rocket Development California Polytechnic Institute Pomona

2 Introduction Rocketry Basics Important Organizations Level 1 Requirements Building Your First Rocket Level 2 Requirements Building Your Second (Higher Level) Rocket Launch! (Calendar)

3 Rocketry Basics Three Types of Motors – Solid (Cheapest, most prevalent, easiest) – Hybrid (Cheaper in higher level rocketry, lots of support equipment, complicated) – Liquid (Usually homemade, extremely complicated, expensive, performance varies) Solid motors will be used until you’re at least Level 2 certified if not Level 3

4 Rocketry Basics Source: NASA (http://exploration.grc.nasa.gov/education/rocket/rktparts.html)

5 Important Organizations National Organization of Rocketry (NAR) – – Provide $1,000,000 insurance (should you have a mishap) – License Committee – Monthly magazine geared towards low power rocketry Tripoli Rocketry Association – – Also provides $1,000,000 insurance – License Committee (sometimes harder to find someone at a launch to certify you) – Monthly magazine geared towards high power rocketry

6 Level One Requirements Level One is surprisingly easy to complete Requires construction of a Level One capable rocket – Good construction techniques – Can fit a H or I impulse class motor (any motor with 160 N-s or more) Fill out NAR High Power Certification Application form (on their website)

7 Level One Requirements Cont. Suggest you launch your rocket at an official launch – NAR or club sponsored – Increases chance that someone that can certify you will be there (any ROC launch will have these, just ask around) Launch! Recover successfully and BAM!, Level One certified

8 Building Your First Rocket Epoxy is the preferred adhesive – 5 minute and 30 minute are good for construction – Super Glue isn’t suggested unless you’re tacking down a part to apply epoxy 300 grit sandpaper is useful for smoothing edges on fins Painter’s tape for making fillets and painting Your favorite color spray paint (high visibility colors suggested)

9 Building Your First Rocket Cont. Latex gloves (epoxy drying on your hands sucks more than getting super glue on them) Take your time, read the instructions with the kit Fillets are important, using a filler with your epoxy will help thicken it so its easier to shape Sand all surfaces where you’re going to be epoxying with 120 grit sand Always start by assembling the motor mount first, and never skimp on the epoxy there

10 Level Two Requirements While Level One is a breeze, Level Two is where things get a bit more interesting. Must be Level One certified already Rocket much be launched on J, K, or L impulse motor (640 N-s to 5120 N-s) Must assemble the motor in front of the person certifying you (all motors in this range are either hybrid or reloadable solid)

11 Level Two Requirements Cont Rocket’s construction will be highly inspected Use of electronics not required (and not suggested, remember K.I.S.S) There’s a multiple choice test based on rocketry regulations and terms – Must pass with an 88% or better (I got 100%, and I’m not that smart. Just memorize the answers) – “Practice test” available, basically just a pool of all the possible questions with their answers – Suggest making flash cards. I memorized the whole test the night before the launch in my tent at the launch site.

12 Building Your Second Rocket Higher impulse motors, faster flights, higher g’s, and larger structures Fillets are more important than ever Make sure your parachute attachment is epoxied in the rocket securely

13 Building Your Second Rocket The coupler where your rocket separates for ejection (or the nosecone) should resist falling off if the rocket is upside down, however it shouldn’t be too hard to pull apart Make sure your motor retainer is nice and solid, or you’ll lose your expensive motor casing (which sucks and fails your attempt as well) Contact the launch organizers and let them know you’re going to attempt your flight beforehand, so they have the forms and tests

14 Launch Calendar ROC Launches – February 13 – March 13 – April 10 – May 8 – June LDRS 29 and Rocstock XXXI (amazing event, thousands of launches, all sizes, including tons of Level Three launches)


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