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‘Last Dance’ Campaign Evaluation - Conclusions Prepared by CBRC for Quit Victoria, September 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "‘Last Dance’ Campaign Evaluation - Conclusions Prepared by CBRC for Quit Victoria, September 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 ‘Last Dance’ Campaign Evaluation - Conclusions Prepared by CBRC for Quit Victoria, September 2013.

2  The Last Dance campaign was recalled by over half (53%) of current Victorian smokers & recent ex-smokers who watch commercial TV.  Those who recalled the ad were more likely to have felt embarrassed to be a smoker, less likely to think about how much they enjoy smoking in the previous week, and more likely to rate quitting as a priority in their life.  Those who recalled the ad (and who lived in metropolitan Melbourne) were less likely to think about the health benefits of quitting within the previous week.  More than two-thirds of respondents agreed that Last Dance made them think about if the events shown in the ad happened to them and their own smoking, and perceived Last Dance to be effective (both 71%).  Over half of respondents also agreed that the ad made them feel motivated to quit (62%) and 50% agreed that the ad made them feel confident about quitting. Conclusions 2

3  Respondents were more likely to agree that Last Dance had motivated them to quit if they also agreed that they perceived the ad to be effective, if the ad elicited positive emotions (hopeful, inspired), or if it made them feel more confident about quitting.  Women were more likely than men to agree that the ad elicited negative emotions.  Compared to smokers aged years, smokers aged years were more likely to perceive the ad to be effective and agree that the ad elicited negative emotions. Smokers aged were also more likely to agree that the ad elicited negative emotions compared to smokers aged years.  Smokers aged years were also more likely to avoid the ad, and agree that the ad irritated them compared to smokers aged years. Conclusions (2) 3

4  Smokers from low SES areas were more likely to feel positive, confident, and agree that the ad elicited self-referencing thoughts.  Contemplators, preparers and recent quitters were more likely than pre-contemplators to agree that the Last Dance elicited self-referencing thoughts, and that they felt more confident, and motivated to quit smoking.  Those who watched more than 4 hours of TV per day were more likely to agree that the ad elicited negative and positive emotions in them, and made them feel determined, and that the ad made them think about their own smoking and if the events in the ad happened to them. Conclusions (3) 4

5  Heavy smokers were less likely to feel confident about quitting smoking, were less likely to discuss the ad, and were more likely to avoid the ad when it was on TV.  During the campaign period there was no evidence of ad wear out, with respondents no more likely to report they were irritated or bored of the ad across the six week campaign period. Conclusions (4) 5


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