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The Program Works Photography. Photography: The minutes of your school year.

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Presentation on theme: "The Program Works Photography. Photography: The minutes of your school year."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Program Works Photography

2 Photography: The minutes of your school year.

3 Photos have impact. In an average size yearbook, the moments depicted total fewer than six minutes in the life of a school –This is calculated by assuming each photo is taken at 1/125 of a second, each spread contains seven action photos and that the book has 200 pages.

4 Thinking photographically. Making intelligent assignments Taking story-telling photos Selecting the best for the book Having each staff member capable of taking a good photo

5 Every photo needs a subject. Provide a point in the photo for the viewer to see Get close Dont depend on cropping selecting a portion of a photo or enlarging making the photo bigger

6 Every photo needs a subject. In this example, because the photographer did not think about a subject, the photo is simply a mass of people. This photo is not worth the precious space it would take on a yearbook page.

7 Every photo needs a subject. Even if a photograph is a close-up of faces, it doesnt necessarily mean there is a subject –In this photograph, notice how no two people are looking at the same thing. Theres no focal point within the group.

8 Taking story-telling photographs. Learn to wait for a photo to happen Action photos are story-telling photos –People take no notice of the photographer and are not directed by the photographer, giving a natural and real picture of what is going on Posed pictures look and feel like the people in the photo were instructed what to do or are acting a certain way for the camera

9 Taking story-telling photographs. Photographers need to stay in the setting long enough to understand what is going on and to allow people to get used to them The experience will equip photographers to write preliminary captions for the photos a must for a good yearbook

10 Find a focus. Be sure the photographer understands what the person designing the particular spread wants –The photographer should be included in the discussion about the spread –The spread designer should relay information regarding any specific requirement –Photographers should take lots of pictures and be creative In this day of digital photography, theres no such thing as taking too many photos A photographer must think photographically and must take a variety of photos

11 Find a focus. For any assignment, the assigning editor and the photographer should discuss the angle for the story and any secondary coverage coverage in addition to the main story –Examples of secondary coverage include a profile on a person, question and answer sessions or thumbs up/thumbs down infographics Photographers should take photos both horizontally and vertically The photography staff has to work on capturing a diversity of people and activities. It also has to work on telling the stories of the year

12 Take four kinds of photos. Photographers need to think through the situation so they take photos that establish the circumstances and what is happening all the way to the detail shot If a photographer strives to capture establishing shots, medium shots and close-ups of all assignments, it will be easy to put together a yearbook spread or photo essay

13 Establishing shot. An establishing shot sets the subject in context to the place, the situation and what is going on It is essential that an establishing shot has a subject a focal point for the reader

14 Establishing shot. Focal points can be created in many ways –Have someone or a group in the foreground that becomes the focus while the background provides supplementary information o The reader first sees the subject and then takes in the rest of the photo

15 Establishing shot. In this photo, the reader focuses first on the drill team member in front and then sees the rest of the girls in the stands

16 Establishing shot. Another way to create a focal point is to provide a frame to help focus the viewer on the subject

17 Establishing shot. In this example, the window frame focuses the viewer on the crowd. Without the frame, the photo would be dull.

18 Establishing shot. A focal point can also be created by using selective focus, a technique by which the subject is in sharp focus while other portions of the photograph are in soft focus.

19 Group interaction shot. A group interaction shot provides more detail and a closer look at the subject Not much background is shown The photographer gets close to the group and portrays interaction among individuals

20 Group interaction shot. In this photo, the photographer shows children working together on a project The overhead angle increases the interest

21 Close-up shot. A close-up shows one to three people interacting with one another or with something in their environment In the case of a single student, the individual could be writing a paper, painting a house or engaging in some other activity

22 Close-up shot. In this close-up, an art teacher is explaining an assignment Notice the wonderful lighting, how your eyes are directed to where he is looking and pointing The photo also establishes where they are

23 Close-up shot. In this example a powder puff football game shows an action photo with two girls competing against one another –It shows the action –It doesnt cut off any necessary body parts –The photo gives them room to move

24 Close-up shot. A teacher reads to a student in this close-up shot It allows the viewer to see the teacher and student share a moment together It shows the book theyre reading, the classroom location, albeit with a blurred focus

25 Detail or parts of the whole photo. A detail or parts of the whole photo is an extreme close-up They can be an effective and interesting contrast when placed with the other three kinds of photos establishing shots, group interaction shots and close-up shots

26 Detail or parts of the whole photo. The caption for this close- up of hands might draw attention to the jewelry The photo provides drama because of the angle and the tight crop

27 Detail or parts of the whole photo. Parts of the whole photos are extreme close-ups A wide-angle lens can provide emphasis

28 Detail or parts of the whole photo. While the viewer may not recognize the boy doing the experiment, the viewer identifies the image and the caption will fully explain what the view doesnt know

29 Rules of composition. There are rules of composition, and integrating multiple rules can result in a quality story-telling photograph

30 Rules of composition. Fill the frame –Photographers should live by this rule! –Get close to the subject and eliminate dead space –Show enough space to allow the subject to move or to look purposefully in a logical direction

31 Rules of composition. The flags frame the young man hanging them The girl in the foreground lets the viewer know he is part of a group It is a tightly cropped photo

32 Rules of composition. Follow the rule of thirds –Think in terms of placing a tic-tac-toe grid on top of a photo –The subject should be in the intersection rather than in the dead center –This is important for designers to understand when they place and crop photos

33 Rules of composition. In this photo, the adult and the two children are in the left portion of the grid while the jar with the bug is near the right intersection

34 Rules of composition. Vary the angle –The way we see the world is not the way we want to show it –Even something ordinary can be unique simply by photographing it from a different angle –Liken photography angles to the face of a clock o Dont take photos from 6 oclock if the subject is at noon unless its a traditional group photo o Other photos are better taken from angles equivalent to 3-4 and 8-9 on a clock

35 Rules of composition. Vary the angle –Be careful when using an overhead angle to be aware of faces o Its easy to get mostly tops of heads

36 Rules of composition. This photo is taken from overhead with the photographer standing on the table

37 Rules of composition. Vary the angle –This fun photo, taken from almost directly below the graduates, shows a typical scene during graduation –Their arms act as frames for their faces and the slight blur of their hands provides a feeling of motion

38 Combining the rules of composition. Good photographs are crafted when the rules of composition are used together

39 Combining the rules of composition. Look at this photo and note the rules of composition that make it interesting

40 Rules of composition. Use leading lines –Leading lines are visible or perceived lines that draw the viewer to a specific place in a photo, usually the subject –The key is getting close enough to the subject

41 Rules of composition. In this photo, the photographer placed the camera on the gym floor and used the line of the floor to guide the reader to the girl doing her work there

42 Rules of composition. Frame the subject carefully –Think of a picture frame and how it frames the photo you place in it –In photography, the frame does not need to be complete

43 Rules of composition. In this photo, the boy in the foreground provides a C-shaped frame for the subject in the background

44 Rules of composition. Capture three-dimensional quality. –While a photograph is flat, it doesnt have to have a flat appearance –If a photographer thinks about having a foreground, middle ground and background, pictures can become three-dimensional o Avoid taking photos directly from the 6 oclock position to the noon position o To achieve a three-dimensional effect, adjust the cameras f-stop or aperture to a low number (and correspondingly higher shutter speed) to bring the subject into focus and the rest of the photo increasingly out of focus

45 Rules of composition. Capture three- dimensional quality. –In this photo, the row of musicians provides depth to the picture but the low f-stop allows only one portion of the photo in tight focus –The viewer clearly sees the subject before looking at the rest of the photo

46 Combining the rules of composition. Heres another example of how the rules of composition complement one another

47 Rules of composition. Repeat designs or objects –Capturing a photo down a line of people repeating the same action creates interest –A photo of a group of students performing an action simultaneously would have interest

48 Rules of composition. In this photo, the hands are obviously the focal point The repetition and the tight focus on the one hand makes the photo dynamic

49 Rules of composition. Consider diagonal lines –Diagonal lines are more interesting visually than straight ones –The same is true of s curves or any non-straight line

50 Rules of composition. In this photo, a diagonal is created by the teacher looking down at the student

51 Rules of composition. Contrast two types –The first type uses the concept of repetition, but one person is doing something different than the rest of the group

52 Rules of composition. In this photo, the runners are all going for the finish line but only the one in front is reacting to the fact he is winning with his expression and body

53 Rules of composition. Contrast two types –The second kind of contrast is lighting. o A lighted image against a dark background, or a dark image silhouetted against a light background both have interest

54 Rules of composition. This example is almost a silhouette with the strong lighting behind the two students

55 In addition to the rules of composition, there are several other guidelines for good photography. 1.Avoid mergers. Mergers occur when backgrounds and subjects compete for the focal point.

56 In addition to the rules of composition, there are several other guidelines for good photography. 2.Think vertical. Approximately 75 percent of the photographs taken in yearbooks should be taken vertically. Faces are vertical shapes as are peoples bodies.

57 In addition to the rules of composition, there are several other guidelines for good photography. 3.Select a point of view. This guideline uses the subjective point of view. The photographer might stand behind a player or students, looking at their teammates or teacher.

58 In addition to the rules of composition, there are several other guidelines for good photography. 4.Look for texture. Light and shadows often create interesting patterns.

59 In addition to the rules of composition, there are several other guidelines for good photography. 5.Remember, focus is not a special effect. Good focus is essential to draw a viewer to the subject. The subject should always be in focus.

60 Student Activity 1.1Evaluate this photo. Describe the rules of composition and why the photo is effective as an action photo.

61 Student Activity 1.2Evaluate this photo. Describe the rules of composition and why the photo is effective as an action photo.

62 Student Activity 1.3Evaluate this photo. Describe the rules of composition and why the photo is effective as an action photo.

63 Student Activity 1.4Evaluate this photo. Describe the rules of composition and why the photo is effective as an action photo.

64 Student Activity 1.5Evaluate this photo. Describe the rules of composition and why the photo is effective as an action photo.

65 Student Activity 1.6Evaluate this photo. Describe the rules of composition and why the photo is effective as an action photo.

66 Student Activity 1.7Evaluate this photo. Describe the rules of composition and why the photo is effective as an action photo.

67 Student Activity 1.8Evaluate this photo. Describe the rules of composition and why the photo is effective as an action photo.

68 Student Activity 1.9Evaluate this photo. Describe the rules of composition and why the photo is effective as an action photo.

69 Student Activity 1.1a Evaluate this photo. Describe the rules of composition and why the photo is effective as an action photo.

70 Student Activity 1.2aEvaluate this photo. Describe the rules of composition and why the photo is effective as an action photo.

71 Student Activity 2.1Evaluate this photo. Determine what makes it feel posed. What positive things could you say to a photographer even as you ask for a retake?

72 Student Activity 2.2Evaluate this photo. Determine what makes it feel posed. What positive things could you say to a photographer even as you ask for a retake?

73 Student Activity 2.3Evaluate this photo. Determine what makes it feel posed. What positive things could you say to a photographer even as you ask for a retake?

74 Student Activity 3.Evaluate these two pictures and tell which one works as an action photo and why the other doesnt

75 Student Activity 4.Collect a dozen lead photos from the daily newspaper. Display them prominently in the classroom. Have the staff evaluate the photos for story-telling ability and examine how the photos display the rules of composition. Find assignments on the yearbook ladder that could be taken using the techniques the newspaper photographers have used.

76 Student Activity 5.Ask the students to bring in story-telling photos they find visually interesting and that use a variety of photo techniques. Create a wall for these, and use them as a reference when discussing a photo assignment with the photographers.

77 Student Activity 6.Create groups of three or four staff members with a photographer in each group. Divide the ladder up among the groups. Have each group brainstorm for a variety of photos that could be taken for each assignment. Suggestions should include all four types of photos (establishing, group interaction, close-up and details or parts of the whole).


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