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Productive Group Work Nancy Frey and Doug Fisher San Diego State University www.fisherandfrey.com Nancy Frey and Doug Fisher San Diego State University.

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Presentation on theme: "Productive Group Work Nancy Frey and Doug Fisher San Diego State University www.fisherandfrey.com Nancy Frey and Doug Fisher San Diego State University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Productive Group Work Nancy Frey and Doug Fisher San Diego State University Nancy Frey and Doug Fisher San Diego State University Productive Group Work

2 Instructional Routines Know How To… Gradual Release of Responsibility Inside View

3 Quality Indicators Engaging & Interactive Front View Back View

4 Purposeful Teaching Focus Lessons Guided Collaborative Independent

5 The helping curriculum

6

7 Early Predictors for Passing (or Failing) the CAHSEE Grade Point Average Absences Classroom Behavior These are present as early as fourth grade Zau, A. C., & Betts, J. R. (2008). Predicting success, preventing failure: An investigation of the California High School Exit Exam. Sacramento, CA: Public Policy Institute of California.

8 There are some myths in education…

9 Reverse effects Developmental effects Teacher effects Zone of desired effects Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses related to achievement. New York: Routledge. Negative Low Medium High Retention: d =

10 Reverse effects Developmental effects Teacher effects Zone of desired effects Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses related to achievement. New York: Routledge. Negative Low Medium High Ability Grouping: d =.12

11 Reverse effects Developmental effects Teacher effects Zone of desired effects Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses related to achievement. New York: Routledge. Negative Low Medium High Homework: d =.29

12 … and some truths as well.

13 Reverse effects Developmental effects Teacher effects Zone of desired effects Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses related to achievement. New York: Routledge. Negative Low Medium High Small group learning: d = 0.49

14 Reverse effects Developmental effects Teacher effects Zone of desired effects Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses related to achievement. New York: Routledge. Negative Low Medium High Meta-cognitive Strategies: d = 0.69

15 Reverse effects Developmental effects Teacher effects Zone of desired effects Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses related to achievement. New York: Routledge. Negative Low Medium High Reciprocal Teaching: d = 0.74

16 Gradual Release of Responsibility: A Framework for Instruction Gradual Release of Responsibility: A Framework for Instruction

17 Lets Make a Foldable Envelope fold Focus Lesson Guided Instruction Collaborative Learning Independent Learning

18 TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson Guided Instruction I do it We do it You do it together Collaborative Independent You do it alone A Model for Success for All Students Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

19 The sudden release of responsibility TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson I do it Independent You do it alone Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

20 DIY School TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY (none) STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Independent You do it alone Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

21 The Good Enough Classroom TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson Guided Instruction I do it We do it Independent You do it alone Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

22 Time for a Story

23 TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson Guided Instruction I do it We do it You do it together Collaborative Independent You do it alone A Model for Success for All Students Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

24 How does Maria: Establish purpose? Model her thinking? Demonstrate? Provide language supports? Utilize productive group work? Provide guided instruction? Check for understanding? Foster metacognition? How does Maria: Establish purpose? Model her thinking? Demonstrate? Provide language supports? Utilize productive group work? Provide guided instruction? Check for understanding? Foster metacognition?

25 Second Grade Mathematics

26 How does Maria: Establish purpose? Model her thinking? Demonstrate? Provide language supports? Utilize productive group work? Provide guided instruction? Check for understanding? Foster metacognition? How does Maria: Establish purpose? Model her thinking? Demonstrate? Provide language supports? Utilize productive group work? Provide guided instruction? Check for understanding? Foster metacognition?

27 How Do You Know Its Productive?

28 What does it look like? What does it sound like?

29 STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Productive group work Group and individual accountability Productive failure Collaborative

30 Students are consolidating their understanding Negotiating understanding with peers Engaging in inquiry Apply knowledge to novel situations

31 Conversational Roundtable Your Notes:Group Member #2: Group Member #3: Group Member #4: Summarize

32 Collaborative Posters in Geometry

33

34

35 Lets make a Foldable Quality Indicators

36 Quality Indicator #1 Complexity of Task: The task is a novel application of a grade-level appropriate concept and is designed so that the outcome is not guaranteed (a chance for productive failure exists).

37 Productive failure

38 Quality Indicator #2 Joint attention to tasks or materials Students are interacting with one another to build each others knowledge. Outward indicators include body language and movement associated with meaningful conversations, and shared visual gaze on materials.

39 Look down, not up.

40 Quality Indicator #3 Argumentation not arguing: Student use accountable talk to persuade, provide evidence, ask questions of one another, and disagree without being disagreeable.

41 The Helping Curriculum

42 Quality Indicator #4 Language support: Written, verbal, teacher, and peer supports are available to boost academic language usage.

43

44 Can you buy your way to happiness? HSHMC Essential Question #

45 The evidence shows that ____. The evidence shows that poor people are not unhappy. The evidence shows that just because you win the lottery you are not guaranteed happiness.

46 My own view, however, is that ___. My own view, however, is that happiness is not based solely on money. My own view, however, is that happiness is a combination of things that happen and dont happen to a person over his or her lifetime.

47 Quality Indicator #5 Grouping: Small groups of 2-5 students are purposefully constructed to maximize individual strengths without magnifying areas of needs ( heterogeneous grouping ).

48 Quality Indicator #6 Teacher role: What is the teacher doing while productive group work is occurring ?

49 Grade 6 Science

50 What are your favorite ways to encourage collaboration between students? What are the benefits and challenges?

51 What does it take to make a task engaging and interactive?

52 Use the second Foldable What Does It Take to Make a Task Engaging and Interactive?

53

54 Enough background knowledge to have something to say. Enough background knowledge to have something to say.

55 Language support to know how to say it.

56 A topic of interest.

57 An authentic reason to interact.

58 Expectations of and accountability for the interaction.

59 An established community of learners that encourage and support each other.

60 Knowledge of the norms of interaction.

61 How do you construct a task that is engaging and interactive ?

62 Gradual Release of Responsibility Inside View

63 Quality Indicators Engaging & Interactive Front View Back View

64 The Takeaway Collaboration is an essential part of learning. Know what youre looking and listening for. Make tasks engaging and interactive.

65 Quality Indicators Engaging & Interactive For Tomorrow Please bring your Foldable and handouts

66


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