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American Red Cross Disaster Mental Health Services 2004 Susan E. Hamilton, Ph.D. Senior Associate, DMHS.

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Presentation on theme: "American Red Cross Disaster Mental Health Services 2004 Susan E. Hamilton, Ph.D. Senior Associate, DMHS."— Presentation transcript:

1 American Red Cross Disaster Mental Health Services 2004 Susan E. Hamilton, Ph.D. Senior Associate, DMHS

2 The American Red Cross Mission The American Red Cross, a humanitarian organization led by volunteers and guided by its Congressional Charter and the Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross Movement, will provide relief to victims of disaster and help people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies.

3 Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross and Red Cross Crescent Movement Humanity Impartiality Neutrality Independence Voluntary Service Unity Universality

4 Red Cross Capacity Since 1881, the Red Cross has responded to disasters Part of the International Movement – 181 National Red Cross & Red Crescent Societies The American Red Cross has 921 local chapters.

5 Local Chapters Develop community relationships & trust Respond to local disasters, especially single family fires Participate in readiness, preparedness, & response activities Disaster Services Mental Health Teams

6 Red Cross Disaster Response Response begins with the local chapter For larger disasters – state and national recruitment When resources need is greater than the state can provide, overall administration transfers to national headquarters in Washington, D.C. Collaboration National Transportation Safety Board FBI in aviation, transportation & mass casualty incidents. Government agencies, mental health associations, other volunteer agencies. Responsibilities under the Federal Response Plan and the National Response Plan

7 Development of Disaster Mental Health Services increased stress levels experienced by disaster workers and victims in Hurricane Hugo and the Loma Prieta earthquake task force with representatives from Psychology, Social Work, Psychiatry, and Nursing Training was developed and licensed mental health volunteers were deployed to Hurricanes Andrew and Iniki. i 1992 < , ,000

8 Following September 11, 2001 Conducted survey to identify lessons learned, key issues, success factors 2002 Organization Review Included examination of Disaster Services & Chapter Services Network structure to determine how to most efficiently support service delivery capacity to field units and provide greater client satisfaction Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years A new Focus on Disaster – changes gradually introduced within Disaster Services designed to provide quicker and better services.

9 Why change? Higher Expectations from constituent groups: clients - fast, easy-to-access, courteous service every time, donors - greater transparency & accountability, volunteers & staff - good supervision & a meaningful experience, partners – better information sharing American Public – Red Cross to be a partner in preparedness & response to emergencies of a previously unimaginable scale Shifting Demographics New Threats Why change?

10 What were the changes? Decentralization into eight service areas.

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12 Other Changes Disaster Services Technology Integration Program (DS TIP) Client Relationship Management (CRM) Client Assistance Cards (CACs) Individual Assistance Providers (IAPs)

13 Client Relationship Management Background CRM system, sold by Siebel Manages information about clients, their needs, and Red Cross assistance Facilitates integration of chapter and nhq processes, activities, and information in real or near- real time Manages & tracks disaster cases and service information Will be used in chapters as well as relief operations Enables workers to deliver services from anywhere

14 Integrated automation of disaster assessment & case management Instantly links disaster assessment data/information with clients to provide faster assistance Manages client information & service delivery in the field as well as in chapters and at service centers Provides near real-time access to client information regardless of where services were provided. Multiple client interactions at multiple locations all recorded electronically in a single client case record. Greatly reduced risk of benefit duplication. CRM Objectives

15 Streamlined processes, procedures and software design for the casework section of CRM conducted Nov – Dec 2003; Application redesigned to focus on usability; Heavily involved chapter product group and chapter advisory group input; Internal User Acceptance Testing conducted February 2004, Pilot conducted mid-March, 2004; training in April; Use of CRM and Client Assistant Cards on nationally- accounted disaster relief operations between March – May Current CRM Status

16 Rapidly deployable modern office automation environment that does not depend on local infrastructure. Deployed on all major disaster relief operations today. Disaster Relief Operations Headquarters Automation

17 Provides rapidly deployable modern office automation environment that does not depend on local infrastructure. ë Telephone with voice mail High speed data connection (including nhq directory service). MS Office applications Networked access to DROMIS applications. File-sharing with nhq Automated DROs equipped with deployed servers Server connected to NHQ via deployed satellite Officers can push or save files from deployed server & permit read-only access by NHQ staff. DRO Headquarters Automation

18 Provides chapters with ability to issue financial assistance through instant issue stored value cards. Chapters load assistance amount via the Internet. Cards accepted where merchant that accepts MasterCard ®. Cash-restricted OR cash-enabled program options available. Will integrate with DSTIP CRM. Cards automatically activated when assistance is approved. Third party activation if no connectivity. Cards* available on nationally-accounted relief operations. Financial assistance automatically accounted * Cash-restricted cards Client Assistance Card

19 Completed and in production: Disaster Relief Operation Automation Client Assistance Cards (chapters) DSTIP Projects

20 Individual Assistance Provider (IAP) IAP Process Flow Redesign

21 Assess Damage Assist / Refer Assess Needs Interview Capture basic client information including name, address, etc Capture damage impact on client, client statement, & Red Cross Disaster Assessment. Understand & determine client needs Determine & provide resources available to meet client needs, including Red Cross services & assistance, as well as referrals. Individual Assistance Workflow Capture basic client information including name, address, etc. Understand & determine client needs Determine & provide resources available to meet client needs, including Red Cross services & assistance, as well as referrals. Understand & determine client needs Determine & provide resources available to meet client needs, including Red Cross services & assistance, as well as referrals. Capture damage impact on client, client statement, & Red Cross Disaster Assessment. Understand & determine client needs Determine & provide resources available to meet client needs, including Red Cross services & assistance, as well as referrals.

22 For more information CRM visit the DSTIP website on CrossNet: s/disasters/ds_tip/dstip_instro.asp E mail questions to: Resources for Chapters

23 Assessment Assessment of damage that relates to assessments of clients needs. Assessment of physical and emotional needs – referral to physical or mental health Assessment of vulnerability – family loss, closeness to site of disaster, prior mental health issues, prior exposure to disaster or trauma – referral to mental health

24 Contact information Susan E. Hamilton, Ph.D


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