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Presentation on theme: "Presentation Plus! Glencoe World Geography Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Developed by FSCreations, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 Send."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Presentation Plus! Glencoe World Geography Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Developed by FSCreations, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio Send all inquiries to: GLENCOE DIVISION Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 8787 Orion Place Columbus, Ohio Welcome to Presentation Plus!

3 Splash Screen

4 Chapter Introduction Section 1Living in the United States and Canada Section 2People and Their Environment Chapter Summary & Study Guide Chapter Assessment Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slides. Contents

5 Intro 1

6 Intro 2 Chapter Objectives Describe the economic activities of the United States and Canada, and identify the transportation and communications systems. Discuss the challenges faced by the United States and Canada in managing their natural resources, preventing pollution, and facing environmental challenges. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

7 Intro 3 As you read this chapter, take notes in your journal on the economic activities, transportation, communications, and environmental concerns of the United States and Canada.

8 End of Intro

9 Section 1-1 Living in the United States and Canada Explain the effects of physical geography on the regions agriculture. Identify the kinds of transportation and communications systems in the region. Describe how the economies of the United States and Canada are dependent on each other and interdependent with those in other parts of the world. Objectives Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

10 Section 1-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. post-industrial commodity retooling pipeline Terms to Know monopoly trade deficit tariff trade surplus market economy Living in the United States and Canada

11 Section 1-3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. New York State Minnesota Seattle Research Triangle Pittsburgh Trans-Canada Highway Corn Belt Places to Locate Living in the United States and Canada

12 Section 1-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.

13 Section 1-5 Advertising is one of the major service industries in the United States. In 1997, U.S. companies spent more than $187 billion to advertise their products or services. About one-quarter of this amount is spent on television commercials. The next biggest markets for advertisements are local newspapers and direct mail.

14 Section 1-6 Economic Activities Both the United States and Canada have free market economies, in which people can own, operate, and profit from their own businesses. Both economies were once primarily agricultural but are now industrial and service economies. (pages 157–159)

15 Section 1-7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Economic Activities (cont.) One billion acres (405,000,000 ha) in the United States and 167 million acres (67,583,000 ha) in Canada are used for agriculture. Only a small percentage of Americans and Canadians work as farmers, because of the high cost of farming, the hard work involved, and unpredictable consumer demand. Agriculture Farming in the region is primarily commercial and large-scale. (pages 157–159)

16 Section 1-8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. U.S. and Canadian ranches and dairies are among the worlds leading producers of beef, milk, and eggs. Both countries also grow a variety of fruits and vegetables and produce chickens and pigs. Key Agricultural Products The major U.S. and Canadian crops are wheat and corn. Economic Activities (cont.) (pages 157–159)

17 Section 1-9 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again. Economic Activities (cont.) (pages 157–159)

18 Section 1-10 Economic Activities (cont.) (pages 157–159) Breaking Geographic Boundaries Geographic factors in the region once limited agricultural work, but technology and modern transportation have largely overcome these limits.

19 Section 1-11 How does the regions physical geography relate to its agricultural production? Because the countries are so large and spacious, large farms and ranches are possible. There is plenty of room in the West for cattle ranches. The temperate climate of the United States is ideal for farming, as are the rich soils of both countries midsections. Major rivers and the Great Lakes provide transportation for farm products. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Economic Activities (cont.) (pages 157–159)

20 Section 1-12 Manufacturing and Service Industries (pages 159–161) About 20 percent of Americans and Canadians work in manufacturing industries, which have been transformed by advanced technologies such as robotics and computerized automation.

21 Section 1-13 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again. Manufacturing and Service Industries (cont.) (pages 159–161)

22 Post-Industrial Economies About 75 percent of Americans and Canadians work in service industries such as government, health care, and education. Section 1-14 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. High-tech and biotechnology industries also employ many people in both countries. Manufacturing and Service Industries (cont.) (pages 159–161)

23 Section 1-15 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The rusting plants and parts gave these areas the derogatory nickname the Rust Belt. Today communities are converting old factories to new uses. Retooling the Rust Belt As the U.S. economy shifted from manufacturing to services, older industrial areas in the Great Lakes and Northeast were left with abandoned factories and steel mills. Manufacturing and Service Industries (cont.) (pages 159–161)

24 Section 1-16 What are some possible uses for an old factory? Possible answers: An old factory might be converted into offices or apartments. It might be made into a shopping mall, or it might be converted into a new kind of factory that produces something different, such as computers. It might become a retail store or the headquarters of a catalogue or online company that ships all its goods. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Manufacturing and Service Industries (cont.) (pages 159–161)

25 The Automobile Extensive automobile use in Canada and the United States has required investment in the building and maintenance of millions of miles of highways, roads, and bridges. Section 1-17 Transportation and Communications (pages 161–163)

26 Section 1-18 Railroads carry relatively few passengers but carry about 35 percent of the regions freight. Another 35 percent is carried by waterways and on large trucks. Pipelines carry the regions gas and oil. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Transportation and Communications (cont.) (pages 161–163) Other Means of Transportation Most Americans and Canadians travel long distances by airplane.

27 Section 1-19 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again. Transportation and Communications (cont.) (pages 161–163)

28 Section 1-20 Those in the United States are privately owned and operated. Communications Canadas broadcasting and telephone systems are operated by the government. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Transportation and Communications (cont.) (pages 161–163) Cellular telephones, faxes, and electronic communications are becoming increasingly common.

29 Section 1-21 Why do you think so many Americans and Canadians travel by airplane instead of by train or bus? Possible answers: Airplanes cover great distances in a very short amount of time. A trip from the Atlantic coast to the Pacific coast of the United States or Canada takes a few hours by airplane but a few days by train or bus. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Transportation and Communications (cont.) (pages 161–163)

30 Section 1-22 Trade and Interdependence Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Canada exports and imports less than the United States and enjoys a trade surplus. (pages 163–164) The United States provides more than 10 percent of all world exports, but its huge purchases of energy, as well as the negative effects of foreign tariffs on U.S. exports, have created an enormous trade deficit.

31 Section 1-23 Trade and Interdependence (cont.) NAFTA The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) removed trade restrictions among the United States, Canada, and Mexico. (pages 163–164)

32 Section 1-24 How do you think the United States might reduce its trade deficit? Possible answers: The United States may explore alternatives to imported fuel or develop more existing sources. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Trade and Interdependence (cont.) (pages 163–164)

33 Section 1-25 United Against Terrorism (pages 163–164) The United States and other nations carried out a war on terrorism following terrorist attacks in the United States on September 11, The first military operation took place in Afghanistan against Osama Bin Ladens terrorist network. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

34 Section 1-26 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again. United Against Terrorism (cont.) (pages 163–164)

35 Section 1-27 United Against Terrorism (cont.) (pages 163–164) What do you think is the best way for the United States to protect its citizens from terrorist attacks at home and abroad? Possible answers: Increased security at public places, improved intelligence gathering, and military action to uproot terrorist networks could protect U.S. citizens from terrorist attacks. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

36 Section 1-28 Checking for Understanding __ 1.an economic system based on free enterprise, in which businesses are privately owned, and production and prices are determined by supply and demand __ 2.total control of a type of industry by one person or one company __ 3.an economy with less emphasis on heavy industry and manufacturing and more emphasis on services and technology A.market economy B.post-industrial C.commodity D.retooling E.pipeline F.monopoly G.trade deficit H.tariff I.trade surplus Define Match each definition in the left column with the appropriate term in the right column. F B A Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

37 Section 1-29 Checking for Understanding __ 4.long network of underground or aboveground pipes __ 5.earning more money from export sales than spending for imports __ 6.goods produced for sale __ 7.a tax on imports or exports __ 8.converting old factories to new uses __ 9.loss of income through trade E I C Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Define Match each definition in the left column with the appropriate term in the right column. A.market economy B.post-industrial C.commodity D.retooling E.pipeline F.monopoly G.trade deficit H.tariff I.trade surplus H D G

38 Section 1-30 Critical Thinking Analyzing Information Describe how recent technological changes have affected the location and pattern of economic activities in the United States and Canada. The switch from heavy industry to high tech and service industries and the relocation of businesses to the Sunbelt have impacted economic activities. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

39 Section 1-31 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Identifying Cause and Effect What factors caused technological growth in the region? How did technology affect agriculture? A skilled workforce, an innovative culture, and a prosperous market economy caused technological growth in the region. Machines applied to agriculture raised production and lessened need for workers.

40 Section 1-32 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Drawing Conclusions Why do the United States and Canada have strong economies? The United States and Canada have strong economies because of their rich natural resources and technological advances.

41 Section 1-33 Analyzing Maps Region Study the economic activity map on the right. How are the locations of manufacturing centers related to the regions lakes and rivers? Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Many of the manufacturing centers are located on or near waterways.

42 Section 1-34 Applying Geography Public Policies Research an issue related to global trade and the United States and Canada. Identify different points of view in each country that affect public policy and decision making on the issue.

43 Section 1-35 Close Pair up with a classmate and compose sentences that explain the significance of the Places to Locate" words in terms of the economic activities that take place there. Someone choose a word and ask for volunteers to read the sentences they wrote.

44 End of Section 1

45 Section 2-1 People and Their Environment Explain how the United States and Canada are learning to manage their natural resources responsibly. Identify causes and effects of pollution in the region, and discuss how it can be prevented. Discuss the environmental challenges faced by the United States and Canada in the 2000s, both as individual countries and as a region. Objectives Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

46 Section 2-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. acid rain smog groundwater eutrophication Terms to Know clear-cutting People and Their Environment

47 Section 2-3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Banks Island Sudbury Places to Locate People and Their Environment

48 Section 2-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.

49 Section 2-5 In 1995 Americans generated more than 208 million tons of garbage. Only 27 percent of the total was recycled or composted. Over 32 million tons of paper and paperboard were recycled that year. Other recycled waste included metals, grass clippings and Christmas trees, plastics, and glass. The Environmental Protection Agency hopes to raise the percentage of recycled garbage to 35 percent by 2005.

50 Section 2-6 Human Impact Efforts are being made throughout the region to repair the damage, but much work needs to be done. Canada and the United States are rich in natural resources, but the growth of industry has seriously damaged portions of the environment. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 165–166)

51 Section 2-7 What can ordinary people do to help the environment? Possible answers: People can recycle bottles and cans, and reuse plastic containers and shopping bags to save the environment. Also, people can never litter, and purchase recycled products. People can also organize cleanup efforts in their community, and plant trees. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Human Impact (cont.) (pages 165–166)

52 Section 2-8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Pollution Acid rain corrodes buildings, damages crops, pollutes soil, and poisons fish. Winds blow acid rain from one region into another. The Great Lakes area is the most seriously affected by acid rain. The United States and Canada are working together to improve air quality and prevent acid rain. Acid Rain Chemical emissions from automobiles, power plants, and factories react with water vapor to cause acid rain. (pages 166–169)

53 Section 2-9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Pollution (cont.) Areas throughout the United States measure air quality and issue warnings to citizens when smog levels are high. Some U.S. states require emissions testing for automobiles. Engineers are researching alternatives to fossil fuels. People can help by riding bikes, walking, or taking public transit instead of driving. Smog Smog is a combination of smoke and fog that creates a haze in the air. (pages 166–169)

54 Section 2-10 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again. Pollution (cont.) (pages 166–169)

55 Section 2-11 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Runoff from fertilizers and pesticides used on farms also pollutes water resources. Water Pollution Industrial waste combines with acid rain to pollute water, killing fish and birds and making people sick. Pollution (cont.) (pages 166–169)

56 Section 2-12 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Cleanup efforts are returning the lakes and rivers to their natural state. Back From the Brink Water in the Great Lakes region became so polluted that the Cuyahoga River in Ohio actually caught fire several times in the 1970s. Pollution (cont.) (pages 166–169)

57 Section 2-13 Automobiles are a major source of pollution, yet most people in this region continue to prefer automobile transportation over mass transit. Why might they do so, and how would you meet this challenge? Possible answers: Many people like the convenience of being able to get from place to place quickly and whenever they want. Some people need their cars to get to work. Bicycles are not practical for people who have to take their children somewhere. Not everyone lives in an area served by public transit. People in the United States often do not live near the places they need to go, so they have to drive. Both countries are large, and in sparsely populated regions, mass transit may be impractical or uneconomical. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Pollution (cont.) (pages 166–169)

58 Section 2-14 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Challenge for the Future The United States and Canada will have to monitor and respond appropriately to changes in temperature and other effects of global warming. The melting of polar ice is accelerating. Global warming poses major challenges to North America and the rest of the planet. (page 169)

59 Section 2-15 Challenge for the Future (cont.) Flooding of rivers and rising oceans threaten coastal areas. Warmer, higher seas alter climate patterns, causing weather events such as El Niño. Areas of the permafrost in the tundra are thawing. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (page 169)

60 Section 2-16 How does global warming affect the area where you live? Possible answers: Increased flooding causes people to lose their homes. Warmer temperatures affect the wildlife in the area. Rising water levels damage parts of cities, change weather patterns, and damage crops. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Challenge for the Future (cont.) (page 169)

61 Section 2-17 Checking for Understanding __ 1.haze caused by the interaction of ultraviolet solar radiation with chemical fumes from automobile exhausts and other pollution sources __ 2.water within the earth that supplies wells and springs __ 3.cutting down whole forests when removing timber __ 4.process by which a body of water becomes too rich in dissolved nutrients, leading to plant growth that depletes oxygen __ 5.precipitation carrying large amounts of dissolved acids which damages buildings, forests, and crops, and kills wildlife A.clear-cutting B.acid rain C.smog D.groundwater E.eutrophication Define Match each definition in the left column with the appropriate term in the right column. D A E C Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. B

62 Section 2-18 Critical Thinking Analyzing Information Why is it important for Canada and the United States to work together to reduce pollution? It is important for Canada and the United States to work together to reduce pollution because wind and water carry pollution across borders. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

63 Section 2-19 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Drawing Conclusions Why are more metropolitan areas of the United States and Canada beginning to experience smog? Metropolitan areas are beginning to experience smog because automobile exhaust gases and industrial emissions are increasing.

64 Section 2-20 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Identifying Cause and Effect What are the short-term and long-term effects of water pollution on people and the environment? Short-term effects include poisoning the food chain from the smallest animals on up, including endangering the health of humans. Long-term effects include eutrophication, which eventually can turn lakes into swamps and then into dry land.

65 Section 2-21 Analyzing Maps Place Study this map of acid rain. Which parts of the region have the greatest concentration of acid rain? Why? Eastward winds carry the rain from the Midwests coal-burning plants to the area around Lake Erie and to eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

66 Section 2-22 Applying Geography Regional Cooperation Think about the cooperation among the United States, Canada, and Mexico in NAFTA to promote free trade. Identify the human factors involved in the trade network created by this agreement. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Possible answers: The human factors involved in this trade network include governments, businesses, workers, and consumers in all three countries.

67 Section 2-23 Close Read the quotation from A Geographic View on page 165 of your textbook. Do you feel this optimism is unfounded or not, based on human problem-solving ability?

68 End of Section 2

69 Chapter Summary 1 Section 1: Living in the United States and Canada (pages 157–164) The regions economy has shifted from reliance on agriculture and traditional manufacturing to emphasis on service and high-tech industries. Agriculture is a key economic activity of the region, although it employs only a small percentage of the workforce. Technology and improved agricultural methods have helped farmers overcome the limitations of physical geography and climate. Key Points Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

70 Chapter Summary 2 Section 1: Living in the United States and Canada (pages 157–164) Dependable transportation and advanced communications systems help make the region an economic leader. The United States and Canada are among the worlds leading exporters. The regions two countries are each others largest trade partners. The region also trades with countries and trade blocs around the world. Key Points Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

71 Chapter Summary 3 Section 2: People and Their Environment (pages 165–169) The United States and Canada are working to manage their rich natural resources responsibly. Acid rain, smog, and water pollution cause damage to the regions environment and affect human health. Cooperative efforts to address environmental concerns are making a difference in the region. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Key Points

72 End of Chapter Summary

73 Chapter Assessment 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Reviewing Key Terms Insert the key term that matches the definition below. acid rainclear-cuttingretooling tarifftrade deficittrade surplus market economy post-industrial 1.___________________ an economic system in which people can own and profit from their own businesses 2.___________________ reduced emphasis on heavy industry 3.___________________ converting old factories to new uses 4.___________________ loss of income through trade post-industrial retooling trade deficit market economy

74 Chapter Assessment 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Reviewing Key Terms Insert the key term that matches the definition below. 5.___________________ a tax on imported trade goods 6.___________________ taking out whole forests when harvesting timber 7.___________________ precipitation that carries high amounts of acids 8.___________________ earning money through export sales tariff clear-cutting acid rain trade surplus acid rainclear-cuttingretooling tarifftrade deficittrade surplus market economy post-industrial

75 Chapter Assessment 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What type of economic system do the United States and Canada have? The United States and Canada both have a market economy. Reviewing Facts Section 1: Living in the United States and Canada

76 Chapter Assessment 4 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What economic activity employs the most people in both the United States and Canada? The service industry employs the most people in both the United States and Canada. Reviewing Facts Section 1: Living in the United States and Canada

77 Chapter Assessment 5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What solutions have the United States and Canada implemented to deal with air pollution? The United States and Canada have implemented emissions laws, production of cleaner automobiles, and encouraging alternatives to automobile transportation to deal with air pollution. Reviewing Facts Section 2: People and Their Environment

78 Chapter Assessment 6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What factors contribute to water pollution in the region? Acid rain, auto and factory emissions, sewage, and industrial and agricultural wastes contribute to water pollution in the region. Reviewing Facts Section 2: People and Their Environment

79 Chapter Assessment 7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What part of the region is experiencing increased environmental problems as a result of NAFTA? The area along the Rio Grande River is experiencing increased environmental problems as a result of NAFTA. Reviewing Facts Section 2: People and Their Environment

80 Chapter Assessment 8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Making Generalizations What challenges will industrial cities face as the economy becomes more dependent on high- technology industries? Some of the challenges industrial cities face include finding new job opportunities for those people who may not have a post-high school education, finding ways to renovate and reuse industrial property, and filling high-tech positions.

81 Chapter Assessment 9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Analyzing Information Explain the connection between transportation patterns and air pollution. Increased transportation brings more pollution to an area because of emissions.

82 Chapter Assessment 10 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Locating Places Match the letters on the map with the physical features of the United States and Canada. __1.Midwest __2.Prairie Provinces __3.California __4.New York __5.Toronto __6.St. Lawrence River __7.Ohio River __8.Alaska __9.Texas __10.Pacific Northwest J C B G D A I F E H

83 Chapter Assessment 11 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Compare the economies of Canada and the United States. Both countries have highly developed market economies. In Canada, the government owns and administers broadcasting and health care services, whereas in the United States, private companies handle these services. Both countries are moving toward developing post-industrial economies with more emphasis on service and high-tech businesses. Agriculture and manufacturing also play important roles in the economies of both countries. Both countries export many of the same goods, and both are major importing countries.

84 End of Chapter Assessment

85 Geography Online Explore online information about the topics introduced in this chapter. Click on the Connect button to launch your browser and go to the Glencoe World Geography Web site. At this site, you will find interactive activities, current events information, and Web sites correlated with the chapters and units in the textbook. When you finish exploring, exit the browser program to return to this presentation. If you experience difficulty connecting to the Web site, manually launch your Web browser and go to

86 STP 1 Study the bar graph below. Then choose the best answer for the following multiple-choice question. If you have trouble answering the question, use the process of elimination to narrow your choices.

87 STP 2 1.As a regional geographer for an oil company, you need to determine the best time for a survey team to work near Barrow, Alaska. Given the information on the bar graph, during which three-month period should the survey take place? AJanuary, February, March BSeptember, October, November CMarch, April, May DJune, July, August Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Test-Taking Tip Study the information shown on the bar graph for average monthly temperature. Look for three consecutive months in which temperatures would be the most favorable for people and equipment to function outside.

88 GeoFact 1 Route 66, the celebrated road from Chicago to southern California, lost much of its traffic and its allure after a number of more modern highways were built in the 1970s. The 2,448-mile (3,940-km) route is making a comeback, however. The U.S. Department of the Interior will spend $10 million by 2010 to preserve Route 66.

89 GeoFact 2 The Wildfires of 2000 scorched more than 6 million acres of land in the western United States, much of it in Montana and Idaho. Rehabilitating the burned land involves using bales of hay and coconut fiber mats to prevent soil erosion and reseeding with native prairie grasses to replace the nonnative cheatgrass, which dries out quickly and provides ample fuel for wildfires.

90 Interdisciplinary Connection 1 Agronomy Climatology Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.

91 Interdisciplinary Connection 1a Agronomy is the branch of agricultural science that deals with the study of crops and soils. Agronomists research methods of crop rotation, irrigation, plant breeding, and weed control. They work to improve soil and increase crop production.

92 Interdisciplinary Connection 1b Climatology A computer model called the Integrated Biosphere Simulator analyzes interactions among humans, the earths atmosphere, and the global ecosystem. Climatologists study land use to see how commercial agricultural practices, for example, can alter ecosystems, which in turn can alter the atmosphere. Replacing forests with pasture results in a drier climate because a pasture does not return as much water to the atmosphere as does a forest.

93 FYI 1 High-Tech Industry Highway System Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.

94 FYI 1a High-Tech Industry The strong U.S. economy of the 1990s made central Texas a leader in the high- tech industry. One of the worlds largest direct-sale computer producers is headquartered in Austin, Texas, as are several computer chip manufacturing firms. Together, these companies employ tens of thousands of people. Their presence, in turn, has an impact on the states shipping industry. Hundreds of trucks are dispatched daily with the finished products.

95 FYI 1b Highway System The Federal Interstate Highway System was started in the 1950s during the Eisenhower administration. Under this system, even numbered highways run east and west; odd- numbered highways run north and south.

96 FYI 2 Yew Trees This valuable tree, which grows in the Pacific Northwest, was viewed as a trash tree until a cancer-battling chemical called taxol was discovered in the bark of the tree. Taxol may cause remission in some patients.

97 World Culture 1 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.

98 SkillBuilder 1 Interpreting a Climate Map Climate helps determine how people live, work, dress, and play in a particular region. People on different continents may share similar climates. By reading a climate map, you can discover these similarities and differences among regions.

99 SkillBuilder 2 Learning the Skill A climate map shows the climate zones of a region. Latitude, temperature, precipitation, altitude, wind patterns, and nearness to oceans help determine the climate of a region. Variation in precipitation also creates different types of climates, such as rain forest (very wet), desert (very dry), and savanna (wet and dry seasons). Interpreting a Climate Map

100 SkillBuilder 3 On a climate map, colors represent different climate regions. The map key explains the color code. To interpret a climate map: Learning the Skill Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Identify the area covered by the map. Study the key to identify the climate regions on the map. Locate the regions in each climate zone. Draw conclusions about the climate similarities and differences among regions. Interpreting a Climate Map

101 SkillBuilder 4 Practicing the Skill Study the climate map of eastern Canada on page 172 of your textbook. Use the information to answer the following questions. 1.What climate dominates the far northeast part of Canada? 2.Which area shown has a humid continental climate? The tundra climate dominates the far northeast part of Canada. The area closest to the United States border has a humid continental climate. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answers. Interpreting a Climate Map

102 SkillBuilder 5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answers. Practicing the Skill 3.What climate does the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador have? 4.Why are so few major cities located in Nunavut and northern Quebec? The coast of Newfoundland and Labrador has a tundra climate. The tundra climate limits economic activities, discouraging the growth of large cities. Study the climate map of eastern Canada on page 172 of your textbook. Use the information to answer the following questions. Interpreting a Climate Map

103 SkillBuilder 6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answer. 5.Why are there only three climate regions represented in eastern Canada? What factors of physical geography may account for this? Practicing the Skill There are only three climate regions represented in eastern Canada mainly because of its location in the high latitudes. Because of its physical geography, the region does not receive warming westerly winds. Study the climate map of eastern Canada on page 172 of your textbook. Use the information to answer the following questions. Interpreting a Climate Map

104 SkillBuilder 7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answer. 6.Compare the climate map on page 172 of your textbook to the natural vegetation map on page 123 of your textbook. What is the relationship between climate patterns and vegetation patterns in eastern Canada? Practicing the Skill The relationship is that tundra has little vegetation, subarctic climates have coniferous forests, and humid continental climates have mixed vegetation. Study the climate map of eastern Canada on page 172 of your textbook. Use the information to answer the following questions. Interpreting a Climate Map

105 Maps and Charts Contents Map Acid Rain Chart The Changing U.S. Workplace, 1900 to Present Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.

106 Maps and Charts 1

107 Maps and Charts 2

108 Political Map Transparency

109 Daily Focus Skills Transparency 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

110 Daily Focus Skills Transparency 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Sulfur dioxide gas and water vapor mix together to produce acid rain.

111 End of Custom Shows WARNING! Do Not Remove This slide is intentionally blank and is set to auto-advance to end custom shows and return to the main presentation.

112 End of Slide Show


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