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REGION V The Changing Environment of Building Automation Bill Swan Alerton.

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Presentation on theme: "REGION V The Changing Environment of Building Automation Bill Swan Alerton."— Presentation transcript:

1 REGION V The Changing Environment of Building Automation Bill Swan Alerton

2 REGION V The Need to Save Energy Drivers The Need to Save Energy Drivers

3 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Primary References and Topics Saving Energy With Your BAS Primary References and Topics

4 REGION V USGBC 2009 Rating Systems & Ref. Guides LEED for Commercial Interiors LEED for Core & Shell LEED for Green Buildings: O&M LEED for New Construction LEED for Schools Saving Energy With Your BAS Primary References and Topics ASHRAE Standards ASHRAE ASHRAE 189.1P (3 rd public review)

5 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Primary References and Topics ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guides (30% reduction from ASHRAE ) Small Office Buildings Small Retail Buildings K-12 School Buildings Other ASHRAE GreenGuide

6 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Primary References and Topics Potable Water Lighting HVAC Controls Hydronic Systems Testing, Calibration and Cx Metering, Measurement and Verification Integrated Systems

7 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Potable Water Potable Water (PW)

8 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Potable Water Issues: 7 – 8% of U.S. energy spent to treat and transport water Highest-quality PW used for low-quality purposes Fresh water sources limited and unequally distributed Increasing demand for water may outstrip sources Strategy: Reduce potable water use Greywater re-use Rainwater harvesting A/C condensate collection Use collected water for Flushing Irrigation Cooling tower make-up

9 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Potable Water The BAS contribution: Monitor tank water level If empty, switch to municipal water Control pump(s) Accumulate filter runtimes Meter potable water usage Meter non-potable water usage Monitor soil moisture sensors for irrigation Other controls for cooling-tower water management Note: Savings show up on water bills, not energy

10 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Potable Water Potable Water-Use Reduction LEED-CIRequired: 20% reduction LEED-CS LEED-NC LEED-Schools LEED-CICredit: (30%-40% reduction, 6-11 pts) LEED-CSCredit: (30%-40% reduction, 2-4 pts) LEED-NC LEED-Schools

11 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Potable Water Water-Efficient Landscaping LEED-CICredit: (50%-100% reduction, 2 or 4 pts) LEED-CSCredit: LEED-SchoolsCredit: LEED-EBCredit:(50%-100% reduction, 1-5 pts) (1-5 pts) 50% to 100% reduction Innovative Wastewater Technologies LEED-CICredit: (50% less PW for sewage, 2 pts) LEED-CSCredit: LEED-NCCredit: LEED-SchoolsCredit:

12 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Potable Water Stormwater (Design): Quantity Control LEED-CSCredit: (1 pt) LEED-EBCredit: LEED-NCCredit: LEED-SchoolsCredit: (+ extra credit) Cooling Tower Water Management LEED-EBCredit: Chemical Management (1 pt) LEED-EBCredit:50% non-PW (1 pt)

13 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Potable Water Metering, Measurement & Verification LEED-EBCredit: meter building and grounds (1 pt) 189.1PMeter building and grounds ( ) LEED-EBCredit:meter end-uses (1 pt) 189.1PMeter end uses ( ) 189.1PStore meter data, issue reports ( )

14 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Potable Water Greywater: Wastewater from showers, baths, non-food sinks Not blackwater, containing organic or toxic matter Defined by local health codes Can only be held for a short time Use where high ratio water demand nonpotable:potable Restaurants Laundries Hotels

15 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Potable Water Greywater re-use pluses: Less demand on municipal water supply Less demand on municipal sewage system Lower water costs Greywater re-use minuses: High initial costs Ongoing maintenance costs

16 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Potable Water Rainwater and condensates: Rain collected from impermeable surfaces such as roofs Pluses: Lower water costs Reduce or eliminate stormwater treatment & conveyance Minuses: High initial costs Ongoing maintenance costs Local/state codes have jurisdiction

17 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Lighting

18 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Issues: ~11% of U.S. electricity for commercial building lighting* Lighting often left on when and where not needed Lighting not always optimal for occupants Excessive light to exterior causes light pollution Strategies: Reduce lighting Turn lights off when not needed Scheduling Occupancy sensors Individual controls Exterior lighting Reduce lighting to minimum need Dimming Daylighting * Source: U.S. Department of Energy

19 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Turn unneeded lights off: Scheduling Use where occupancy times are regular and known Provide (individual) on-time overrides Provide (zone/room) off-time overrides with timeout Unify with the BAS/EMCS scheduling system

20 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Turn unneeded lights off: Scheduling 90.1, Automatic Lighting Shutoff ( ) Shut off building lighting on a scheduled basis 90.1, Space Control ( ) Override of scheduled-off up to 4 hours allowed 189.1P, Controls for Outdoor Lighting ( ) Turn off 50+% (certain) exterior lighting when not needed 189.1P, …Egress and Security Lighting ( ) Lighting >5 W/m 2 controlled by time switch

21 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Turn unneeded lights off: Scheduling Light Pollution Reduction: Non-emergency lighting visible to exterior reduced 50+% Override up to 30 minutes okay LEED-CI:Credit: (Reduce 11PM – 5 AM,1 pt) LEED-CS LEED-NC LEED-Schools

22 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Turn unneeded lights off: Scheduling ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guides: AEDG – Small Office Buildings EMCS can be used to schedule… outdoor lighting…

23 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Turn unneeded lights off: Occupancy Sensors Two basic types: Passive Infrared (PIR) Direct view Ultrasonic Indirect sensing (restrooms, etc.) May be sensitive to strong airflow Sensors are optimized per application. Read the manufacturers literature! Workspaces: Look-down ceiling sensor for small-motion work is best

24 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Turn unneeded lights off: Occupancy Sensors 90.1, Automatic Lighting Shutoff ( ) Shut off lighting 30 minutes after space unoccupied 90.1, Space Control ( ) Shut off lighting 30 minutes after space unoccupied in classrooms, conference rooms, lunch & break rooms

25 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Turn unneeded lights off: Occupancy Sensors 189.1P, Occupancy Sensor Controls ( ) Lists room types that shall have occupancy detectors Automatic and manual shutoff required Specifies dimming and daylighting operation 189.1P, …Multi-Level Switching or Dimming ( ) (Where and how occupancy sensors interact) 189.1P, Manual-ON Occupancy Sensors ( ) Occupancy sensors shall be manual-on/automatic-off

26 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Turn unneeded lights off: Occupancy Sensors Light Pollution Reduction: Non-emergency lighting visible to exterior reduced 50+% Occupancy detector override up to 30 minutes okay LEED-CI:Credit: (Reduce 11PM – 5 AM,1 pt) LEED-CS LEED-NC LEED-Schools

27 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Turn unneeded lights off: Occupancy Sensors ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guides: Small Office Buildings (& Small Retail) Use manual-on/automatic-off sensors In daylit spaces use manual-on sensors (+ task lamps) In open-plan offices: Ceiling-mounted ultrasonic sensors Revert to manual-on after manual- or automatic-off In private offices: IR wall-box sensors Generally sensors should be medium to high sensitivity 15-minute delay to turnoff (lamp life vs. energy savings)

28 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Turn unneeded lights off: Individual Controls Individual controls gives control over workspace Greater satisfaction through better control Provide lower-energy task lighting Controllability of Systems, Lighting: Individual controls for 90% (workspace) occupants Controls for shared multi-occupant spaces LEED-CI:Credit: (1 pt) LEED-EB:Credit: (50% occupants & shared, 1 pt) LEED-NC:Credit: (1 pt) LEED-Schools:Credit: (+ learning spaces, 1 pt)

29 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Turn unneeded lights off: Exterior Lighting Dim and/or turn off exterior lighting when not needed Building facades, parking lots, garages etc. 90.1, Exterior Lighting Control ( ) Lighting not for dusk-to-dawn operation controlled by: Combination of photosensor and time switch, or Astronomical time switch 189.1P, Controls for Outdoor Lighting ( ) Continuous dimming at least 50% to 80% reduction, or 25% to 50% reduction of continuous-dimmed HID sources

30 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Turn unneeded lights off: Exterior Lighting ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guides: AEDG – Small Office Buildings Use photocell or astronomical time switch EMCS can schedule and manage outdoor lighting When building unoccupied, turn off non-security lighting

31 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Reduce lighting to minimum need: Daylighting Adjust lighting for desired levels in daylit zones Use photosensors to set lighting level Pluses: Reduced energy costs (possibly 60+%) * Extends lighting maintenance cycle up to 3x * Minuses: Increased initial cost Needs close architectural, structural and lighting design * Source: ASHRAE GreenGuide

32 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting 189.1P, …Lighting in Daylight Zones ( ) Reduce lighting power in response to available daylight: By continuous dimming, or Combined stepped switching and daylight sensing Reduce lighting to minimum need: Daylighting …Energy Performance, Lighting Controls: LEED-CI:Credit: (within daylight zones, 1 pt) Credit: (50+% of connected load, 1 pt) Credit: (75+ of connected load, 1 pt)

33 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Reduce lighting to minimum need: Daylighting ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guides: AEDG – Small Office Buildings In offices, dim instead of switch to minimize distraction Switching may be used in non-office environment Consider more switching levels than minimum Avoid checkerboard or non-uniform patterns Sensor must be properly specified for situation Sensor best installed in window frame or skylight well Controls must be commissioned after furniture in place Most sensors require day- and night-time calibration Poor calibration can lead to permanent override

34 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Lighting Reduce lighting to minimum need: Daylighting ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guides: AEDG – Small Retail In sales areas, dim instead of switch to minimize distraction Switching may be used in non-sales environment Sensor best installed in skylight well AEDG – K-12 Schools Sensor must be properly specified for situation Closed-loop sensor installed above unobstructed location Open-loop sensor best installed in skylight well Consider todays requirements of video image projection

35 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls HVAC Controls

36 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls Issues: <25% of commercial building floor space has an EMCS * Just 13 BAS faults account for 4-20% total energy use ** Strategy: Save energy by: Greater use of schedules and other means for shutdown Ventilate only as needed Use more efficient heating and cooling strategies Reducing equipment runtimes Efficiently unloading equipment Automated fault detection and diagnostic systems * Source: Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 2003, Energy Information Administration ** Source: Energy Impact of Commercial Building Controls and Performance Diagnostics, TIAX LLC 11/2005

37 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls Use Less Energy! LEED-CI, Optimize Energy Performance, HVAC: 1. Install HVAC systems with specified efficiency requirements (5 pts), with appropriate zoning and controls (5 pts). 2. Demonstrate HVAC component performance 15% (5 pts) or 30% (10 pts) better than AEDG Small Office & Retail, Control Strategies Short summary of strategies including time-of-day scheduling, setback temperatures, etc.

38 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls Off-Hour Controls 90.1, Automatic Shutdown: ( ) HVAC systems shall have at least one of: Time schedules (7 days), 2 hour manual override Occupant sensor shutdown 30 minutes no occupancy Manually-operated timer up to 2 hours Shutdown on security system activation 90.1, Off-hour controls: ( ) HVAC systems shall comply with Automatic Shutdown Setback Controls Optimum Start Controls, and Zone Isolation.

39 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls Off-Hour Controls 90.1, Optimum Start Controls: ( ) Heating and cooling systems > 10,000 cfm shall have optimum start controls. 90.1, Setback Controls: ( ) Heating systems in climate zones (2-8) shall be capable of maintaining zones at 55°F or lower. Cooling systems in (dry) climate zones 1b, 2b and 3b shall be capable of maintaining zones at 90°F or higher to prevent high humidity levels. 90.1, Zone Isolation: ( ) Zones to be operated or occupied non-simultaneously shall be isolated.

40 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls Off-Hour Controls 90.1, Shutoff Damper Controls: ( ) Outdoor air supply and exhaust systems shall have motorized dampers that will shut when spaces served are not in use. (Exceptions for preoccupancy warm-up, cool down, code requirements, etc.) 90.1 summary: HVAC systems shall have: Methods for automatic shutdown, Specific setback requirements depending on climate, Optimum Start capability, Isolation of zones used/occupied at different times, and Motorized dampers to be closed when spaces not used.

41 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls CO 2 Sensors 90.1, …Controls for High-Occupancy Areas: ( ) Demand-controlled ventilation (DCV) is required for spaces > 500 ft 2 and 40+ people/1000 ft 2 (and served by air-side economizer, modulating outdoor air damper, or outdoor airflow >3000 cfm) P, …Controls for High-Occupancy Areas: ( ) Supersedes 90.1 DCV requirements. DCV shall comply with ASHRAE P, Naturally-Ventilated Spaces: ( ) Densely-occupied spaces require CO 2 monitoring. (Installation details included.)

42 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls CO 2 Sensors 189.1P, CO 2 Sensors: ( ) Installation details and requirements for CO 2 sensors, including accuracy to ±50 ppm at 1000 ppm. Outdoor CO 2 may be measured near outdoor air intake or assumed to be 400 ppm and 189.1P summary: 90.1 requires DCV for high-occupancy areas P supercedes 90.1 DCV requirements, specifies CO 2 sensor installation and requirements. LEED-Schools, Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring: Naturally ventilated and densely-occupied spaces (25+ people/1000 ft 2 ) require CO 2 monitoring. (1 pt)

43 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls CO 2 Sensors AEDG Small Office, Ventilation Air DCV should be used in varying and high-occupancy areas and may use CO 2 sensors. See Carbon Dioxide Sensors. AEDG Small Office & Retail, Carbon Dioxide Sensors Recommends sensor locations and density, and use of multiple sensors. DCV should maintain CO 2 at 600 ppm over outdoor CO 2, but should not exceed limits set by code. Outdoor CO 2 may be measured near outdoor air intake or assumed to be 400 ppm. CO 2 sensors should have an accuracy no less than 75 ppm.

44 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls Ventilation Monitoring LEED-Schools, Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring: Monitor ventilation system performance, with alarms on variance of 10% or more from design. (1 pt) 189.1P, …Ventilated by Mechanical Systems: ( ) In VAV systems direct total outdoor airflow to be monitored down to minimum outdoor airflow rate, with accuracy of 15% of minimum outdoor airflow rate. Issue alarms when flow rates are not in compliance.

45 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls Economizers AEDG Small Office & Retail Buildings, Economizers Economizers, when recommended, help save energy... Consider using enthalpy controls to avoid introducing unwanted moisture in hot, humid climates. AEDG Small Office Buildings, Ventilation Air The systems should be capable of modulating the outdoor air, return air and relief dampers to provide up to 100% of the design air supply quantity, using outdoor air for cooling. 90.1, Design Capacity: ( ) Air economizers shall be capable of modulating the outdoor air and return air dampers to provide up to 100% of the design air supply quantity, using outdoor air for cooling.

46 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls No Unnecessary Heating 90.1, Heat Pump Auxiliary Control: ( ) Heat pumps with (supplemental) heaters shall have control to prevent supplemental heating when heat load can be met by the heat pump alone during steady-state operation and setback recovery. Supplemental heating is permitted during outdoor air defrost cycles. 90.1, Humidifier Preheat: ( ) Humidifiers with preheating jackets in the airstream shall shutoff preheat when humidification is not required.

47 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls Individual Controls Controllability of Systems, Thermal Comfort: Individual controls for 50% (workspace) occupants Controls for shared multi-occupant spaces LEED-CI:Credit: (1 pt) LEED-CS: LEED-NC: LEED-Schools:

48 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS HVAC Controls Prevent Opposed Operations 90.1, Humidification and Dehumidification: ( ) Prevent simultaneous operation of humidification and dehumidification equipment. 90.1, Zone Controls: ( ) Zone controls shall … prevent reheating, recooling, mixing or simultaneously supplying air that is mechanically heated and air that has been cooled mechanically or by economizers, and other simultaneous heating and cooling. 90.1, Dehumidification: ( ) Humidification controls shall prevent mixing hot and cold airstreams, and simultaneous air stream heating and cooling.

49 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Hydronic Systems Hydronic Systems

50 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Hydronic Systems 90.1, Three-Pipe System: ( ) A common return system for both hot and chilled water shall not be used. 90.1, Two-Pipe Changeover System: ( ) Common distribution for heated and chilled water may be used if: Changeover deadband is 15°F outdoor air temp, System operates 4+ hours before changeover, and Heating and cooling supply temps 30°F at changeover. 90.1, Hydronic … Heat Pump Systems: ( ) Hydronic heat pumps with a common heat pump water loop with central heat rejection (e.g. cooling tower) and heat addition (e.g. boiler) shall have controls providing deadband 15°F between initiation of heat rejection and addition.

51 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Testing, Calibration, Cx Testing, Calibration, Cx

52 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Testing, Calibration, Cx Issues: Commissioning can be broken down into five phases – predesign, design, construction, acceptance, warranty/ continuous commissioning (or recommissioning). – ASHRAE GreenGuide Case studies on commissioning show that construction and operating costs can be reduced from 1 to 70 times the initial cost of commissioning. - ibid. Even a few days of occupancy with poorly calibrated controls can lead to permanent overriding of the system and the loss of all savings. – AEDG Small Office Buildings Strategy: Save energy by: Testing, Calibration and Commissioning

53 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Testing, Calibration, Cx 189.1P, Systems: ( ) The following systems shall have Acceptance Testing: HVAC, IAQ and refrigeration and associated controls Lighting: daylighting controls, occupancy, auto-shutoff Energy measurement devices Water measurement devices 189.1P, Systems: ( ) The following systems shall be commissioned: HVAC, IAQ and refrigeration and associated controls All lighting and shading controls Service water heating systems Energy measurement devices Water measurement devices

54 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Testing, Calibration, Cx Fundamental Commissioning…Energy Systems: Designate Commissioning Authority (CxA) Develop, execute and document commissioning of: HVAC system and associated controls Lighting controls, including daylighting Etc. LEED-CI:Required LEED-CS: LEED-NC: LEED-Schools:

55 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Testing, Calibration, Cx Enhanced Commissioning: Additional activities for the CxA after system performance verification is completed, in part to keep system running efficiently. LEED-CI:Credit: (5 pts) LEED-CS:Credit: (2 pts) LEED-NC: LEED-Schools:

56 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Testing, Calibration, Cx AEDG Small Office & Small Retail Buildings, Calibration and Commissioning (daylighting) Even a few days of occupancy with poorly calibrated controls can lead to permanent overriding of the system and the loss of all savings. - Most photosensors require daytime and nighttime calibration sessions. - The photosensor manufacturer and the QA provider should be involved in the calibration. - Document the calibration and Cx settings and calendar intervals for future calibration.

57 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Testing, Calibration, Cx AEDG Small Office Buildings, Filters Replacement of dirty filters should correspond to filter manufacturers recommendations. Use a filter differential gauge to monitor filter pressure drop; senmd an alarm when filter pressure exceeds predetermined pressure drop. AEDG Small Office & Small Retail Buildings, CO 2 Sensors Inaccurate CO 2 sensors can cause excessive energy consumption and poor air quality… CO 2 sensors should be … factory calibrated and calibrated periodically as recommended by the manufacturer.

58 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Testing, Calibration, Cx AEDG Small Retail Buildings, Economizers Periodic maintenance is important with economizers, as dysfunctional economizers can cause substantial energy consumption due to malfunctioning dampers and/or sensors. AEDG Small Office Buildings, Expanded Recommendations for Daylighting Controls All lighting controls musty be calibrated and commissioned after the furniture is in place.

59 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS MM&V Metering, Measurement, and Verification (MM&V)

60 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS MM&V 189.1P, Meters (water): ( ) Domestic water, both potable and reclaimed, entering the building shall be monitored or submetered P, Meter Data Collection (water): ( ) All building meters, monitoring systems and submeters shall communicate water consumption data to a meter data management system. Meters shall record hourly and provide data daily, at a minimum P, Data Storage and retrieval (water): ( ) Data management system shall be able to produce reports of hourly, daily, monthly and annual water consumption from each meter, and provide alarm capabilities.

61 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS MM&V 189.1P, Consumption Management (energy): ( ) Meters shall collect energy consumption data for each building energy source and convey them to a data acquisition system P, Energy Consumption Data Collection: ( ) All building meters shall communicate energy consumption data to a data acquisition system. Meters shall record hourly and provide data daily, at a minimum P, Data Storage and retrieval: ( ) Data acquisition system shall be able to produce reports of hourly, daily, monthly and annual energy consumption from each meter.

62 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS MM&V Measurement and Verification: Submeter tenant energy usage, or, install continuous metering for end uses. (LEED-NC & -Schools: Consider diagnostics for alarms on leaky valves, faulty controls, etc.) LEED-CI:Credit: (2-5 pts) LEED-CS:Credit: (end use meter, 3 pts) LEED-CS:Credit: (tenant meter, 3 pts) LEED-NC:Credit: (end use meter, 3 pts) LEED-Schools:Credit: (end use meter, 3 pts)

63 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS MM&V Minimum/Optimize Energy Efficiency Performance: Meter all energy use. Points for additional meters. LEED-EB:Required: LEED-EB:Credit: (additional, 1-18 pts) Performance Measurement: System-Level Metering: Have system level metering for 40+% (1 pt) or 80+% (2 pts) of building energy consumption. LEED-EB:Credit: (1 pt)

64 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS MM&V Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring: Monitor ventilation system performance with alarms on specified variance from design. LEED-CI:Credit: (10%,1 pt) LEED-CS:Credit: (10%, 1 pt) LEED-EB:Credit: (15%, 1 pt) LEED-NC:Credit: (15%, 1 pt) LEED-Schools:Credit: (10%, 1 pt)

65 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS MM&V Water Performance Measurement: Meter and record potable water use. Points for additional meters. LEED-EB:Credit: (1 pt) LEED-EB:Credit: (additional, 1 pt) Thermal Comfort Monitoring: Meter and record temperature and humidity every 15 minutes or less. Alarm on situations requiring adjustment or repair. LEED-EB:Credit: (1 pt)

66 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS MM&V AEDG Small Retail Buildings, Economizers Periodic maintenance is important with economizers, as dysfunctional economizers can cause substantial energy consumption due to malfunctioning dampers and/or sensors.

67 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Integrating Systems Integrating Systems

68 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Integrating Systems 90.1, Automatic Lighting Shutoff ( ) Shut off building lighting on a signal from another alarm or control system that indicates the area is unoccupied P, Automatic Control of HVAC and Lights in Hotel/Motel Guest Rooms ( ) Guest room lights, switched outlets and HVAC setback controlled by: Room occupant control (key, card, etc), or Occupancy sensors. AEDG Small Office Buildings, (EL24 – no title) Turn off exterior lighting not designated for security purposes when the building is unoccupied.

69 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS A Case Study A Case Study

70 REGION V Saving Energy With Your BAS Looking to the Future Looking to the Future

71 REGION V The Changing Environment of Building Automation Thank you! Bill Swan Alerton Ask not what you can do for your building automation system, Ask what your building automation system can do for you.


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