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Student Engagement: Indicators 5, 6 and 7 Dr Sarah Williamson Head of Learning and Teaching Support and Sarah Ingram Student Voice Officer

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Presentation on theme: "Student Engagement: Indicators 5, 6 and 7 Dr Sarah Williamson Head of Learning and Teaching Support and Sarah Ingram Student Voice Officer"— Presentation transcript:

1 Student Engagement: Indicators 5, 6 and 7 Dr Sarah Williamson Head of Learning and Teaching Support and Sarah Ingram Student Voice Officer

2 The Cardiff Context We aim to monitor and enhance student engagement and student experience through one body of work We have 25,000 students in 27 Academic Schools (no college/faculty arrangements) can lead to many different systems…

3 The Cardiff Context Published a new Education Strategy in July 2011 Students as Partners is one of our three objectives This is described through our Student Voice Framework (based on NUS/HEA Student Engagement Toolkit) We measure and improve our student engagement activities using our Student Voice Framework

4 Three Levels of Engagement Involvement Opportunities are provided for students to express individual opinion, perspectives, experiences, ideas and concerns. Participation Opportunities are provided for students to take a more active role in a defined activity Partnership Collaboration between the University/schools and students, involving joint ownership and decision- making regarding developments to the Cardiff experience

5 Through involvement… Students are consulted throughout their student lifecycle through a variety of University and national surveys. We also ask students to provide feedback through module evaluation questionnaires and provide feedback to their student reps We continue to report back to students on the outcomes of actions taken as a result of their feedback

6 Through participation… The Student Academic Representative system allows student reps to play an important role in the decision-making of the University using feedback from their students Every year, a variety of student focus groups are conducted to inform University policy developments

7 Through partnership… We work closely with our Student Academic Council We benefit greatly from our ongoing, close working partnership with our Students' Union and its Elected Officers. This work includes the development and implementation of our Fee Plan and our work this year on developing our Student Charter.

8 Indicator 5 Higher education providers, in partnership with their student body, ensure through appropriate induction and ongoing support, that students and staff are equipped to fulfil their roles in student engagement in quality systems effectively.

9 Working with Indicator 5 Students and staff need an understanding of the system if they are going to be an effective part of it If students and staff have an understanding of how quality systems work, they will be able to provide more relevant feedback Students and staff need continued support (as well as initial training) in order to extend their knowledge and remind themselves of the system and procedures

10 Examples of practice – Ind5 Annual briefing about Student Academic Representation system attended by a member of staff in each School Annual briefing about Student Academic Representation system attended by a member of staff in each Schoo Annual Students Union Student Rep Training Annual Students Union Student Rep Training Online training and website resources Student Charter/Introduction to Uni/ First Hundred Days Student Charter/Introduction to Uni/ First Hundred Days

11 Examples of practice – Ind5 Annual briefing about student representation attended by a member of staff in each School: Outline the processes and important dates; Emphasise developments in the system; Discuss emerging best practice from the schools. Jump to next section

12 Examples of practice – Ind5 Annual Students Union Student Rep Training: Introduces reps to their roles and responsibilities; Outlines the University and Union systems and how reps feed into them; Elucidates skills that reps will develop; Discusses possible campaigns and ways of engaging students. Jump to next section

13 Examples of practice – Ind5 Online training and website resources: All training materials, campaign tools and institution information is available on a password-protected section of the student representation site. This is being extended to include online training resources for particular rep roles and equality and diversity. Jump to next section

14 Examples of practice – Ind5 Student Charter/Introduction to Uni/ First Hundred Days A number of ongoing projects at Cardiff will seek to give all students a better understanding of the purpose of giving feedback and the quality systems at University, so that students have a deeper knowledge of how and why they should get involved. Jump to next section

15 Difficulties with Indicator 5 HE providers in partnership with the student body: the students do not ensure induction and ongoing support for themselves, therefore this indicator may not be an accurate descriptor of the process. All students and staff can access the briefing/training and online resources, however, 1/3of the reps attend face- to-face training and only 4/5 of the staff are briefed. Not all reps and staff access the online resources and therefore there are some reps that will not receive any training at all. Whilst personal ongoing support is provided through the elected sabbatical officer for students and through central University staff for staff in Schools, there are no advanced training sessions. There is no training or continued support for some students who sit on University or School-level committees.

16 Indicator 6 Higher education providers, in partnership with their student body, share information so that students and staff involved in quality systems have an equally informed voice

17 Working with Indicator 6 Students and staff should have access to qualitative and quantitative information that the University receives about their performance via student or other stakeholder feedback The information only needs to be given to students and staff involved in the quality systems Context and meaning needs to be given to the information that is shared, giving staff/students the raw data is unhelpful

18 Examples of practice – Ind6 Involving student in the module evaluation process Involving student in the module evaluation process NSS briefings for student reps The Student Voice on the Education and Students Policy Network The Student Voice on the Education and Students Policy Network

19 Examples of practice – Ind6 Involving student in the module evaluation process: Student reps are given the module evaluation questionnaire information for modules they participated in last year, or are about to participate in. They take this information back to their students, discuss it with them and then discuss it within their Student-Staff Panel in November, agreeing actions that need to be taken as a result of the feedback. The feedback can add context to issues i.e. why there has been a particularly low mean mark in a module and allows students to see their feedback resulting in actions which are then fed back to them. Jump to next section

20 Examples of practice – Ind6 NSS briefings for student reps The Students Union created School-level briefings for student reps on their NSS figures so that they could compare their department scores to the University and the sector, these were made available to them online, with information on how to effectively use the results. Jump to next section

21 Examples of practice – Ind6 The Student Voice on the Education and Students Policy Network: As well as Students Union elected officers, around ten ordinary students sit on the Education and Students Policy Network, they receive briefings beforehand and are able to make meaningful contributions to policies and projects in their early stages of development. Jump to next section

22 Difficulties with Indicator 6 Currently schools do not show external examiner reports to students and are anxious about showing them unedited reports. Some of the information we get from our quality processes are not student-friendly, i.e. Periodic Review reports, and would not be useful to students in their current format. Should we be looking to have student-friendly versions? Who should write these?

23 Indicator 7 Higher education providers, in partnership with their student body, monitor and review the effectiveness of student engagement in their quality systems

24 Working with Indicator 7 The effectiveness of students is a lot more than whether they turn up or not, or whether they are trained. It is difficult to quantitatively measure this impact, as its effects might be subtle and it is also entirely dependent on the individual students. You can take a horse to water... All quality systems includes: programme approval and maintenance, School-level student representation, University committees etc

25 Examples of practice – Ind7 Annual Review Benchmarking Student engagement in University policy and projects Student engagement in University policy and projects Students awareness of the quality and representation systems Students awareness of the quality and representation systems

26 Examples of practice – Ind7 Annual Review Every student Chair of every Student-Staff panel fills in a one page Annual Review form each year to summarise the impact of the panels work. This is then written up by the Academic and University Affairs Officer into an Annual Statement which is submitted to University Council. Jump to next section

27 Examples of practice – Ind7 Benchmarking The Student Representation system is benchmarked against national (NUS/HEA benchmarking tool) and institutional benchmarking tools to understand areas where improvements should be prioritised. Jump to next section

28 Examples of practice – Ind7 Student engagement in University policy and projects In the last few years, student engagement in key policies and projects have been monitored to make sure student consultation events mirror staff consultation events in number and diversity of groups to give students the same impact on key University decisions. Jump to next section

29 Examples of practice – Ind7 Students awareness of the quality and representation systems Internal (and national) surveys query students knowledge of the representation systems within their department to ensure that all students have the ability to give feedback to their representative. If there is limited knowledge about the system then it cannot effectively engage with students. Jump to next section

30 Difficulties with Indicator 7 It is very difficult to measure the actual impact of students on anything, though it is understood that it is important, as this is the main point of any effective system or process.

31 The Cardiff Approach If you are interested in learning more about Cardiffs approach to Student Engagement and the Student Voice please visit our dedicated web pages:


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