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End Show Slide 1 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Biology.

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Presentation on theme: "End Show Slide 1 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Biology."— Presentation transcript:

1 End Show Slide 1 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Biology

2 End Show Slide 2 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity

3 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 3 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Natural selection and other processes have led to a staggering diversity of organisms. Biologists have identified and named about 1.5 million species so far. They estimate that 2–100 million additional species have yet to be discovered.

4 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 4 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Why Classify? To study the diversity of life, biologists use a classification system to name organisms and group them in a logical manner. Why Classify?

5 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 5 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Why Classify? In the discipline of taxonomy, scientists classify organisms and assign each organism a universally accepted name.

6 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 6 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Assigning Scientific Names Common names of organisms vary, so scientists assign one name for each species. Always in Latin. Genus species Homo sapiens

7 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 7 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Assigning Scientific Names Carolus Linneaus developed a naming system called binomial nomenclature. In binomial nomenclature, each species is assigned a two-part scientific name. The scientific name is italicized. Canis familiaris Felis catus

8 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 8 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Linnaeuss System of Classification Linnaeus's System of Classification Linnaeus not only named species, he also grouped them into categories. What is Linneauss system of classification?

9 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 9 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Linnaeus's seven levels of classification arefrom smallest to largest species genus family order class phylum kingdom Linnaeus's System of Classification

10 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 10 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Linnaeus's System of Classification Each level is called a taxon, or taxonomic category. Species and genus are the two smallest categories. Grizzly bear Black bear

11 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 11 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Grizzly bear Black bear Giant panda Genera that share many characteristics are grouped in a larger category, the family. Linnaeus's System of Classification

12 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 12 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Red fox Grizzly bear Black bear Giant panda An order is a broad category composed of similar families. Linnaeus's System of Classification

13 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 13 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Abert squirrel Class Mammalia Black bear Giant panda Grizzly bear Red fox Linnaeus's System of Classification The next larger category, the class, is composed of similar orders.

14 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 14 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall PHYLUM Chordata Black bear Giant panda Grizzly bear Red fox Abert squirrel Coral snake Several different classes make up a phylum. Linnaeus's System of Classification

15 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 15 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall KINGDOM Animalia Black bear Giant panda Grizzly bear Red fox Sea star Abert squirrel Coral snake The kingdom is the largest and most inclusive of Linnaeus's taxonomic categories. Linnaeus's System of Classification

16 End Show 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Slide 16 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Red fox Grizzly bear Black bear Giant panda Sea star Coral snake Abert squirrel Linnaeus's System of Classification

17 End Show - or - Continue to: Click to Launch: Slide 17 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall 18-1

18 End Show Slide 18 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall 18-1 Which statement about classification is true? a.Biologists use regional names for organisms. b.Biologists use a common classification system based on similarities that have scientific significance. c.Biologists have identified and named most species found on Earth. d.Taxonomy uses a combination of common and scientific names to make the system more useful.

19 End Show Slide 19 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall 18-1 Linnaeus's two-word naming system is called a.binomial nomenclature. b.taxonomy. c.trinomial nomenclature. d.classification.

20 End Show Slide 20 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall 18-1 Several different classes make up a(an) a.family. b.species. c.kingdom. d.phylum.

21 End Show Slide 21 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall 18-1 A group of closely related species is a(an) a.class. b.genus. c.family. d.order.

22 End Show Slide 22 of 26 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall 18-1 Which of the following lists the terms in order from the group with the most species to the group with the least? a.order, phylum, family, genus b.family, genus, order, phylum c.phylum, class, order, family d.genus, family, order, phylum

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