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Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Important Please note that the Safety Passport should only be used as an introduction.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Important Please note that the Safety Passport should only be used as an introduction."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Important Please note that the Safety Passport should only be used as an introduction to the Health and Safety processes and procedures that are currently in place within the Robert Gordon University. Staff and Students must also complete all relevant laboratory induction programmes within each School.

2 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Role of the Supervisor Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University 2/1 Role of the Supervisor

3 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Role of the Supervisor Of all the people in the Health and Safety management chain the one with the most important role is the Supervisor. Supervisors are themselves normally well versed in the activities being carried out. This makes it even more disappointing when they do not realise their responsibilities. When dealing with health and safety issues common sense is no substitute for well thought out safe working practices. Management with help from safety advisors and specialists lay down a heath and safety policy. It then falls to the Supervisor to implement this policy. Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University 2/2 Role of the Supervisor

4 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Role of the Supervisor To implement a health and safety policy supervisors must ACT A - ADVISE Specify the approved working practices. C - COMMUNICATE Ensure the procedures involved are known to those under their supervision. T - TRAIN Make sure individuals know how to follow the required procedures Then as their title implies they must SUPERVISE Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University 2/3 Role of the Supervisor

5 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Role of the Supervisor It is also vital that rules are not being seen to be broken by those people entrusted to enforce them - Supervisors This is a waste of time I could be getting on with my own work - a common cry from Supervisors But if they become involved in a prosecution / litigation as the result of an accident, to someone under their supervision the time spent dealing with this far outweighs the time that should have been spent on supervision. 2/4 Role of the Supervisor

6 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Accidents: Causes and Examples 2/5 Accidents: Causes and Examples

7 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Accidents What is an Accident ? It is an unplanned and uncontrolled event which could, or has, led to people being injured, damage to plant or other loss. Accidents are not mysterious events. There is always a reason for them and they can be prevented. We can plan and control activities in the workplace to ensure accidents do not occur. 2/6 Accidents: Causes and Examples

8 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Accidents Accidents can be seen as being affected by 3 factors: 4 Equipment and Materials 4 Environment 4 People 2/7 Accidents: Causes and Examples

9 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Accidents Endless research has been carried out, using data gathered from submitted accident reports, to see how accidents can be prevented. From this it was noted that for every 330 reported accidents: 1 results in a major injury 29 result in a minor injury 300 result in no injury. Birds Research 2/8 Accidents: Causes and Examples

10 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Accidents A porter cut his hand on a broken pipette which was in a waste bag Toe was broken when gas cylinder fell on it Strained stomach muscles when lifting photocopier A small quantity of ether was stored in a refrigerator causing an explosion. The refrigerator had not been modified to remove sources of ignition Explosion in a fumecupboard occurred when a student was subliming tetrazole at atmospheric pressure. His supervisor had failed to check chemical properties, method or quantity 2 molar solution of caustic soda solution splashed into the eyes of a student whilst removing a stuck stopper. Safety specs were provided but the lecturer in charge of the lab had told students it was not necessary to wear them 2/9 Accidents: Causes and Examples

11 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Accidents Summary Accidents are caused they dont just happen. We can take actions to prevent accidents. Negative attitudes towards health and safety and not following laid down systems, rules and procedures may lead to accidents. The University must report accidents that stop a person working for 3 days or more to the enforcement agencies. Some accidents and work related diseases must be reported immediately. 2/10 Accidents: Causes and Examples

12 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Smoking, alcohol, drug abuse - R.G.U. Polic y 2/11 Smoking, alcohol, drug abuse - R.G.U. Policy

13 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Smoking, alcohol and drug abuse People under the influence of alcohol or drugs at work are not only a hazard to themselves but also to those people who work with them. Universities now regard drug abuse and alcoholism as a health problem and encourage Staff and Students with such problems to seek help and advice. Warnings associated with prescribed drugs and drugs bought over the counter must be heeded as these can often lead to lethargy and drowsiness. 2/12 Smoking, alcohol, drug abuse - R.G.U. Policy

14 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Smoking, alcohol, drug abuse - R.G.U. Policy Alcohol and Drugs related problems It is the aim of the University to provide support, encouragement and assistance to employees or students who suspect or know that they may have an alcohol or drugs-related problem. Further advice is available, in confidence, from the Human Resources Department and Student Health Services. Smoking A No Smoking Policy is in force in all non- residential buildings of the University. 2/13 Smoking, alcohol, drug abuse - R.G.U. Policy

15 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Smoking, alcohol, drug abuse - R.G.U. Policy In common with all employers RGU is committed to a rigid policy on smoking, alcohol and drug abuse. But within this policy there is a built in procedure to help staff and students, whose activities are being adversely effected by such abuse, recognise that there is a problem and to offer counselling. If after such an offer the problem still exists there is then a series of disciplinary steps to go through. If these steps are then ignored the ultimate penalties of dismissal or expulsion are brought in to play. 2/14 Smoking, alcohol, drug abuse - R.G.U. Policy

16 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Reporting of Accidents 2/15 Reporting of Accidents

17 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University 2/16 Reporting of Accidents RIDDOR 95 This is the abbreviation for the Reporting of injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 RIDDOR 95 requires the reporting of work-related accidents, diseases and dangerous occurrences. It applies to all work activities, but not to all incidents. Reporting of accidents and ill health at work is a legal requirement. The information obtained allows the enforcing authorities to identify where and how risks arise. Advice can then be given on preventative action to help reduce injury, ill health and accidental loss.

18 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University 2/17 Reporting of Accidents What needs to be reported: Death or major injury: If there is an accident on University premises and a member of Staff, Student, Visitor or Contracted Worker is killed or suffers a major injury and is taken to hospital the enforcing authority (H.S.E.) must be notified, by telephone, without delay. When contacted the H.S.E. will ask for brief, concise details regarding the injured person and the accident. This initial contact must the be followed up, within ten days, with a completed accident form.

19 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University 2/18 Reporting of Accidents Reportable major injuries: Fracture other than to fingers, thumbs or toes. Amputation. Dislocation of the shoulder, hip, knee or spine. Loss of sight (temporary or permanent) Chemical or hot metal burn to the eye. Any penetrating injury to the eye. Injury from an electric shock or electrical burn. Any injury leading to unconsciousness or requiring resuscitation. Unconsciousness caused by asphyxia or exposure to harmful substance or biological agent. Acute illness requiring medical treatment, or loss of consciousness arising from absorption of any substance by inhalation. Acute illness requiring medical treatment where there is reason to believe that this has resulted from exposure to a biological agent or its toxins or infected material

20 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University 2/19 Reporting of Accidents Over-three-day injury: An over-three-day injury is one which is not deemed major but results in the person being away from work or unable to do their normal work for more than three days. If there is an accident on University premises and a member of Staff, Student, Visitor or Contracted Worker suffers an over-three-day injury a completed accident form must be sent to the enforcing authority within ten days. Disease: If a doctor notifies the University that a person, who had been carrying out work activities on University premises, is suffering from a reportable work-related disease a completed diseases report form must be sent to the enforcing authority.

21 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University 2/20 Reporting of Accidents Reportable diseases include: Certain poisonings. Some skin diseases such as occupational dermatitis, skin cancer, chrome ulcer, oil folliculitis / acne. Lung diseases including occupational asthma, farmers lung, pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, mesothelioma. Infections such as leptospirosis, hepatitis, tuberculosis, anthrax, legionellosis and tetanus. Other conditions such as occupational cancer, certain musculoskeletal disorders, decompression illness and hand-arm vibration syndrome.

22 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University 2/21 Reporting of Accidents Dangerous Occurrence: If something happens which does not result in a reportable injury, but which clearly could have done, then it may a dangerous occurrence which must be reported immediately to the enforcing authority. Within ten days this must be followed up with a completed accident report form. Reportable Dangerous Occurrences : These are far to numerous to list. Again from the description given all such occurrences must be reported so as ensure all risk is eliminated and the occurrence does not happen again

23 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University 2/22 Reporting of Accidents Keeping records: Records must be kept of any reportable injury, disease or dangerous occurrence. The record must include: the date and method of reporting the date, time and place of the event. personal details of those involved a brief description of the nature of the event or disease. The record can be kept in any format: Filed report forms Computer database Hand-written log

24 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University 2/23 Reporting of Accidents Summary RIDDOR requires that all notifiable incidents are reported to the H.S.E. If an incident occurs and a person involved in that incident is required, after being given first aid as felt appropriate, to go to hospital H.S.E. must be informed straight away. HSE Incident Contact Centre : Only after contact with the HSE should the R.G.U. Health and Safety Office be informed. RGU Health and Safety Office : In all cases, whether it is a reportable injury, reportable disease or a dangerous occurrence an R.G.U. Incident Form must be completed and forwarded appropriately.

25 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment 2/24 Risk Assessment

26 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment Hazard: A hazard is something with the potential to cause harm. This can include substances or machinery, methods of work and other aspects of work organisation. Risk: Risk expresses the likelihood that the harm from a particular hazard is realised 2/25 Risk Assessment

27 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment H.S.E. Booklet available, free of charge, outlining the recognised Five Steps to Risk Assessment Covers all aspects of Risk Assessment for all activities likely to be carried out on University premises or whilst carrying University work. 2/26 Risk Assessment

28 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment Five Steps to Risk Assessment Step 1 : Look for the hazards. Step 2 : Decide who might be harmed and how. Step 3 : Evaluate the risks and decide whether the existing precautions are adequate or whether more should be done. Step 4 : Record your findings. Step 5 : Review your assessment and revise if necessary. 2/27 Risk Assessment

29 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment Step 1 - Look for the hazards Look around the workplace and decide what could be reasonably expected to cause harm. Concentrate on significant hazards - those which could cause serious harm - those which could affect several people. Ask others what they think -especially those who use that workplace. Refer to manufacturers operating instructions, safety data sheets, accident reports and ill-health records. 2/28 Risk Assessment

30 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment Step 2 - Decide who might be harmed Students, Staff, Support Staff Cleaners, visitors, contractors etc. People who share your workplace but are not involved in the same activity. 2/29 Risk Assessment

31 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment Step 3 - Evaluate the risks - are existing controls adequate ? - should more be done ? Consider how likely it is that each hazard could cause harm. Categorise the hazards as high, medium or low. Are all legal requirements being met with regards to PPE, Machine Guards etc. ? If not is everything reasonably practicable being done to keep the workplace safe. The aim is to make all risks small. 2/30 Risk Assessment

32 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment Step 3 contd. If something needs done draw up an action list. Make a priorities list aimed at those risks deemed high and those which will affect most people. Can the hazard be removed altogether ? If not can the risk be controlled so that harm is unlikely. Controlling the risk Try a less risky option Prevent access to the hazard. Organise tasks to avoid exposure to the hazard Issue appropriate PPE Provide welfare facilities 2/31 Risk Assessment

33 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment Step 4 - Record your findings If five or more people are employed the significant findings of the risk assessment must be recorded. All people affected must be informed of the findings Risk Assessments must be suitable and sufficient. It must be shown that: a suitable check was made you asked who might be affected the obvious significant hazards were dealt with precautions taken are reasonable and the remaining risk is low. 2/32 Risk Assessment

34 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment Step 5 - Review and revise At some time new equipment and new work procedures will be introduced which could lead to new hazards being introduced to the workplace. If changes are significant, or completely new, complete a new risk assessment. It should be standard practice to review all risk assessments from time to time to ensure that precautions put in place are working effectively. 2/33 Risk Assessment

35 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Identify Hazards Can hazards be removed? Estimate/Evaluate consequence of use Is consequence and risk acceptable? Review periodically Introduce control measures Has new hazard been created? Stop Assessment Estimate/Evaluate risk of use No Yes Risk Assessment 2/34 Risk Assessment Copyright© The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University

36 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment R.G.U. Policy There is a requirement for all staff to perform suitable risk assessments for all activities being carried out on University premises as well as for those being carried out outwith University premises ( field trips, industrial visits etc.) Responsibility for the completion of these risk assessments lies with Line Managers, Laboratory Supervisors and Research Supervisors. The procedures to be followed are as laid down on the previous slides (5 Steps to Risk Assessment) From these Consequence, Probability and Risk can be calculated. 2/35 Risk Assessment

37 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment Consequence There is now a requirement to quantify the harm which could occur due to the hazards identified. The guidelines given are as follows. Fatal = 3Fatality / Loss Time Injury (LTI). Extensive asset damage. HSE involvement probable. Major = 2Medical Treatment Case (MTC). Asset damage > £10K. Dealt with by local HSO. Minor = 1First Aid Case. Asset damage <£10K. Dealt with by School Line Manager. Probability Required now to quantify the probability of the identified hazards causing harm. The guidelines are as follows. Likely / Probable = 3Likely / probable something will happen. Possible = 2Could be expected to happen occasionally Unlikely = 1 Almost never happen 2/36 Risk Assessment

38 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment R.G.U. Policy Risk Now for each hazard identified need to quantify the risk by: Consequence x Probability = Risk Likely / ProbablePossibleUnlikely (x3) (x2) (x1) Fatal (x3) Major (x2) Minor(x1) High Risk = 6 to 9Medium Risk = 4Low Risk = 1 to 3 Action High Risk - Avoid if possible. Task must not begin. Further analysis required. Discuss with Line Manager Medium Risk - Task may begin provided all control measures are in place. However close supervision may be required to ensure compliance with controls. Low Risk - Acceptable risk providing all controls are in place. 2/37 Risk Assessment

39 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment Codes of Practice and Standard Operating Procedures These can be used to help standardise the risk assessment process Inexperienced people may perceive an activity or piece of equipment to be extremely hazardous whereas in reality if carried out properly or used in the correct prescribed manner, are in fact perfectly safe. By getting experienced workers / practitioners to put down correct operating procedures and processes. By getting them to list all risks and hazards and how these can be minimised and then deeming these to be the approved standard for that particular workplace can only be of benefit to he risk assessment process. 2/38 Risk Assessment

40 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Risk Assessment Codes of Practice and Standard Operating Procedures Standard Operating Procedures can be produced for specialist equipment such as centrifuges and autoclaves. Codes of Practices can be produced for general activities such working in a general chemistry laboratory or using a cold store. These could be accessed by all either by use of hard copy or on the internet for example. A standard risk assessment form should still be used but the COP and SOP eliminates any discrepancy and ensures correct practice when planned activities are put into operation. 2/39 Risk Assessment

41 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Personal Protective Equipment 2/40 Personal Protective Equipment

42 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Personal Protective Equipment For some activities Staff and Students have to wear special clothing and equipment to protect them from workplace hazards. This is known as PPE. PPE is the last item to be suggested in the need for control measures and should only be used as a last resort once all other means of hazard control have been exhausted. PPE be relevant and sufficient for the activity being undertaken Examples of types of PPE í Goggles and face screens to protect eyes and face í Helmets to protect head í Hearing defenders to protect against damage to hearing í Safety shoes to protect feet and prevent slipping í Face masks to protect against airborne particles í Laboratory Coats 2/41 Personal Protective Equipment

43 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Personal Protective Equipment PPE will only provide protection if it is used and used properly As well as the Universitys legal requirement to provide PPE ( safety specs, face masks, gloves)there is also a requirement to ensure that it is being used in a proper manner. Disciplinary measures can be used if employees are found not to be using PPE when instructed to do so. Legal Duty Staff and Students have a legal duty to wear PPE if it: is suitable protection against the risk for which it is supplied is cleaned and maintained properly is replaced when worn and broken is stored correctly fits properly 2/42 Personal Protective Equipment

44 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Personal Protective Equipment Care and storage of PPE PPE must be kept clean and in good repair Manufacturers recommended replacement time scales must be followed. Replacements must be readily available PPE must be stored in a clean dry and well ventilated place. PPE must be made available to all visitors who have to enter hazardous areas. Summary 4 PPE must only be used as a last resort. 4 The University will provide certain articles of PPE. 4The University has a legal obligation to ensure PPE is used correctly. 4 Staff and Students have a legal obligation to wear provided PPE. 4 PPE must be kept clean and in good repair. 2/43 Personal Protective Equipment

45 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University First Aid 2/44 First Aid

46 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University First Aid The University whilst doing all that is reasonably practicable to avoid accidents in the workplace must still be prepared for them if they happen. This is all part of good health and safety practice. First Aid - RGU Policy If a member of Staff of RGU, who is a certified First Aid practitioner, is required to administer First Aid to someone they are only required to: ensure the person is comfortable and not in distress carry out only procedures shown to them on the ascribed RGU First Aid course. use their own judgement as to what plan of action should be taken. not hesitate in the slightest if he or she feels an ambulance should be called for - let the professional people take over. 2/45 First Aid

47 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University First Aid First Aid Provision To comply with the Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981, the University has to make sure that they are prepared for an accident or emergency. The cover required depends on the number of people employed and the type of work they are involved in. Low Risk Occupations Work in offices and shops are deemed low risk. In these occupations there is no legal requirement for a trained first-aider unless there are more than 150 employees. Despite this there should always be someone who can take responsibility if an accident occurs or someone takes ill. This appointed person will have relevant phone numbers (doctor and or ambulance service) to ensure medical assistance can be sought. 2/46 First Aid

48 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University First Aid High Risk Occupations These are deemed to be in factories, building sites, hospitals, research labs, Here if there are more than 50 employees there must be an appropriately trained first-aider. If these high risk occupations involve the use chemicals and hazardous substances first-aiders will require more specialist training. First Aid Kits There is a minimum a first aid kit should include: 3 Individually wrapped plasters 3 Sterile eye pads 3 Triangular bandages 3 Sterile dressings of various sizes 3 Safety pins 3 Sterile water 3 It must not contain tablets or medicines ! 2/47 First Aid

49 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University Summary The University has a legal duty to provide for an accident or emergency. The level of First Aid cover may include: Trained first-aiders Specialist trained first-aiders Appointed persons First Aid room First Aid kits Specific First Aid items The location of First Aid boxes as well as individual first-aiders must notified to all Staff and Students. 2/48 First Aid

50 Copyright © The School of Applied Sciences The Robert Gordon University First Aid Notices such as this give name and contact details of RGU accredited First Aiders. 2/49 First Aid


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