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Discovering Nottingham Rebranding, Regeneration and Renewal P.S.Fox. MMX The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX.

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Presentation on theme: "Discovering Nottingham Rebranding, Regeneration and Renewal P.S.Fox. MMX The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX."— Presentation transcript:

1 Discovering Nottingham Rebranding, Regeneration and Renewal P.S.Fox. MMX The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

2 Introduction These photographs were taken as part of the Rebranding Nottingham Fieldwork visit on Thursday 8 th April 2010 to illustrate the changes that have been constant in the development of Nottingham in its growth as a city. Some photographs and materials have been added to provide an additional information and background. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

3 Location and site The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

4 South Prospect of Nottingham about 1750 looking towards Castle and St Marys Hill across the Meadows and the River Leen. This prospect illustrates the site of the city, north of the River Trent on two small hills; Castle Hill and St. Marys Hill. Source: Nottingham City Library The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

5 John Speeds map of part of Nottingham 1610 Source: Nottingham County Library This map shows Nottingham as the garden city. The central square is marked as G. Notice the orchards and the parks. The River Leen is shown in the southern part of the map. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

6 Nottingham 1750 looking from the South towards St Marys Church. The age when Nottingham was seen as a garden city Source: Nottingham City Library Nottingham from the south 1750 The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

7 Map Pre 1790 Gardens and open spaces Castle now Duke of Newcastle's Mansion Lace Market – Plumtre House Gardens No Canals or Railways – pre 1839 The enclosure of Nottingham was later than many other cities [1845] which had two main consequences – overcrowding and the development of industry in surrounding settlements. Source: Nottingham City Library The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

8 Salmons Map 1861 Source: Nottingham County Library This map shows some of the industrialisation and overcrowding that took place in Victorian Nottingham. The largest church shown – to the right [East] is St Marys – in the Lace Market. The Market Square is in the top left [North West] of the map. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

9 Nottingham Gateway The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

10 Nottingham Railway Station Opened in 1904 as a replacement for two previous stations by the Midland Railway. The railway was opened to Nottingham on 30 th May 1839, the line to Lincoln 4 th August The area between the Railway Station and the city centre called The Gateway is due to be redeveloped – the Broad Marsh Shopping centre is to be expanded. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

11 The Tram Viaduct looking towards the Lace Market The Nottingham Tram system used some of the route of the old railway route to the old Victoria Station – an example of reuse. The tram is to be extended to the west and south. Transport 2000 resulted in the limitation of traffic in the centre of the city. Nottingham is soon to introduce car parking charges for workers within the city too. The Chapel in the background is High Pavement Chapel built on the site of a previous chapel started in The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

12 Nottingham Canal – looking east The Nottingham Canal, opened in 1792 to allow coal owners to trans-ship coal to Nottingham form the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire Coalfields was lined with factories and wharves. Now on the right is Capital One part of which occupies the old Boots print works which was opened in 1952 on a bombed out site. On the left is new offices and businesses not yet opened. [2010] Location : Bridge over Nottingham Canal adjacent Capital One HQ The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

13 Capital One Headquarters Building Reflecting the development on the North side of the canal. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

14 High and Middle Pavement New buildings and refurbishment The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

15 Nottingham Contemporary This art gallery, on High Pavement was opened in 2009 to provide an additional attraction to this area and to the city for tourists. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

16 Nottingham Contemporary Art Gallery The Gallery features and outside piazza and a café. This area had been derelict for many years before this was constructed on this site. An example of the reuse of a derelict site. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

17 Drury Hill – 1960 one of the many slum areas of Nottingham in Victorian times – Drury Hill was demolished to make way for the Broad Marsh Shopping Centre – Source: Nottingham City Library The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

18 Weekday Cross This was the trading centre of the old Saxon settlement on the main route into Nottingham from the Trent Bridge and the south. Now this is the entrance to the Lace Market area for tourists. The area was restored by the Nottingham Civic Society in The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

19 Middle Pavement These high class Georgian Houses, owned in their time by the rich gentry have been repurposed into up-market high class niche shops and services. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

20 Middle Pavement Paul Smiths Shop – Willoughby House This high quality Georgian House was built for Rothwell Willoughby one of Nottinghams first bankers. In 2004 it was refurbished for Paul Smith – a local fashion designer and now acts as a shop. An example preservation and reuse. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

21 Pitcher and Piano This Chapel has had many uses over the past decade – from Chapel to lace museum. It is now a bar. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

22 Shire Hall, High Pavement This building, constructed in and refurbished many times acted as the Crown court, Jail and place of execution. In recent years it has become the Galleries of Justice one of the only judicial museums in the country – with court rooms and cells on view. It is thought that an original Saxon Hall occupied this site in The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

23 St Marys Church, Lace Market This is one of the oldest churches in Nottingham at the centre of the Saxon community and reputedly now one of the largest Parish churches in the country. Probably started as a Saxon minster in the 12 or 13 th century but restored and enlarged in Built with money from the town guilds. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

24 St Marys Church The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

25 St Marys Church The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

26 Original doorway in the church wall on High Pavement The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

27 National Ice Stadium Built on the site of a 1930s ice stadium on the kudos of the performance of Torvill and Dean. Half funded by the National Lottery Fund. Opened in 2000 at a cost of £40 million it seats It has no car parking facilities because the City Council were keen that it should be accessed by Public Transport! The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

28 The Lace Market Redevelopment of a Victorian Area – improving what there is The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

29 The Lace Market – Broadway Built in the mid nineteenth century to be the centre for lace marketing [not manufacture] The area became very run down in the 1960s and was made into a Conservation area and later transformed into apartments, clubs, bars and small businesses. This was funded by the Historic Buildings Council and a development company. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

30 Broadway – Lace Market The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

31 As part of the refurbishment of this area a multi-story car park was constructed which is illustrated here but designed to be in keeping with the other buildings in the area. Stoney Street The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

32 The Adams Building – Lace Market Built and redeveloped between with funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund and The European Development Fund and English Partnerships – cost £16.5 million. The building designed by the Nottingham architect T.C. Hine is now part of New College Nottingham. An example of refurbishment and reuse. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

33 The Adams Building The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

34 Hockley Hockley is a small niche shopping and entertainment area mainly developed in recent years on the popularity of Nottingham as a student city. This shop was one of the first used by the Boots Company – when it was built it was one of the most advanced in terms of design in the country. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

35 The Victoria Shopping Centre City shopping attraction and rehousing The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

36 Victoria Centre The Victoria Centre was one of the first large indoor shopping centres built in Britain – 1965 – It was build on the site of the Victoria Railway Station complex – the clock tower remains. A high rise block of council flats towers over the centre – to provide accommodation for some of the people displaced by the redevelopment of the slum areas of Nottingham The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

37 The Entertainment and Education Quarter Theatre, Concert Hall, Cinema Complex, Nottingham Trent University The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

38 Nottingham Theatre Quarter Multiplex Cinema Village 2001 built on the site of the Nottingham Evening Post – printing plant. Now a 16 screen cinema complex with clubs and bars. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

39 Cinema and entertainment complex The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

40 Theatre Royal and Concert Hall Complex The Theatre Royal was built when the city was enclosed after 1845 north of Backside. The theatre was opened in 1865 and was bought and restored by the city council in This was one of Britain's first theatre restoration projects and has been followed by many others. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

41 Theatre Royal Nottingham 1860 – The redevelopment of the Theatre Royal in the 1970s formed the basis for the development of a entertainment complex in this area of the city. The Theatre Royal is an example of building which was remodelled and extended to meet modern requirements without compromising the original interiors. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

42 Theatre Royal The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

43 Tram route – Market Street This street, Market Street, was cut through some of the worst slum housing areas in Nottingham in 1865 when the theatre was built at its Northern end. Market Street links the Market Square to parliament Street. It is now traffic free – with exception of trams and buses. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

44 Old Victorian Area The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

45 Hurts Yard – Burgess Plots This is one of the few alleyways still left which shows the pattern of building in Victorian Nottingham – this alley runs from Parliament Street [called Back Side] to the Market Square. This area, once one of the most overcrowded in Nottingham has undergone considerable re- development with the exception of this example. Many of the shops here are closed and boarded up but ripe for development in a Dickensian theme. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

46 Hurts Yard The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

47 Long Row and Market Square Improve and reuse The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

48 Long Row Long Row was one of Nottingham's most important streets. Originally colonnaded this is where almost every conceivable type of service could be found twenty four hours a day. Most of the shops extend into caves below. Competition from the two large shopping centres – Broad Marsh and the Victoria Centre has resulted in this area becoming to some extent eclipsed although the Market Square still proves to the be the main focus of the city. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

49 King and Queen Street King and Queen Street extend from the Market Square to Parliament Street in The statue of Brian Clough is a recent addition to this area celebrating his links with the city. The building in the background is the Prudential Assurance building – , restored 1991 The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

50 Queens Chambers – Long Row This important building was designed by the local architect – Watson Fothergill who designed and built many Nottingham buildings – especially in The Park. This Tudorbethan Gothic building was opened in It has had a variety of uses. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

51 Market Square Old Market Square – Reconstruction Gustafson Porter The Old Market Square lies at the core of the city. It remained a Market until 1920s when the Council House was rebuilt. The Goose fair was held in the Square for many centuries until the fair was moved to The Forest. The Square was surrounded by walls with many steps and the vision was to redevelop it into a single level area which could be used for a variety of different events. Here it is occupied by a large Ferris wheel. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

52 Market Square The Council House was rebuilt as part of the Nottingham City plan to upgrade the city in the 1920s. It was designed by T. Cecil Howitt and opened 22 nd May It is modelled on Milans Galleria Vittorio Emmanuele with a dome not unlike St Pauls but only 200ft high. The clock bell is called Little John The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

53 Uses of the Market Square The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

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55 Old Market Square Reused Summer 2009 Nottingham by the sea! Photographs P. S. Fox The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

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58 Bell Inn – Market Square This is thought to be the oldest Inn in Nottingham. Part of it lies on the site of a Carmelite Friary. It was re-fronted in It has a vast cave complex under it. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

59 St Jamess Street St Jamess Street links the Market Square and Maid Marion Way. It is a terrace of early 19 th shops and houses. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

60 1960s Development Improve access but at what cost? The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

61 Maid Marion Way – looking North Maid Marion Way slashed its way across the western part of the city centre in 1960 cutting off the Castle from the Market Square. It has been said that it would have been a great embarrassment to Maid Marion! The City Council have worked hard to allow pedestrians a better route across it with crossings. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

62 Maid Marion Way – Looking South The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

63 The Castle The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

64 Nottingham Castle Gate House Nottingham Castle stands on a Sherwood Sandstone Hill to the West of the city centre. It was constructed by William Peveril [son of William I] It was used as a Royal Castle by Henry II, Henry III, Edward III, Edward IV, Richard I and King John. By 1525 it was a ruin which was bought and redeveloped by the Duke of Newcastle, William Cavendish as a copy of a house in Antwerp. It was damaged by reform rioters in 1831 and remodelled by T.C. Hine as one of the first municipal galleries in the country which it remains. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

65 Nottingham Castle Gate House The only part of the original castle that remains is the base of the Gate House and the curtain walls. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

66 Severns – Castle Gate This house built in 1340 was a restaurant on Middle Pavement until 1969 when the Broad Marsh shopping centre was constructed. It was dismantled and moved to this new location. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

67 The Olde Trip to Jerusalem – Castle Gate This is thought by some to be the oldest inn in Nottingham but it is thought that this inn did not open until 1618 not the 1189 displayed. It was not called the Trip to Jerusalem originally. However, it probably is on the site of the Castle brewery. Brew house Yard The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

68 1919 redevelopment The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

69 Newcastle House – Castle Boulevard Newcastle House – This factory and offices was one of the first to be built using concrete mushroom columns with an outer skin. The building was constructed as part of the redevelopment of Castle Boulevard in the 1920s. To protect the building from demolition a conservation area was drawn around it! The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

70 Castle Boulevard – looking west Castle Boulevard was part of Nottingham City Councils Post War reconstruction scheme [1919] which also manifested in twenty new housing estates and an outer ring road! The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

71 Gunn and Moore Ltd. Located in a small factory off Castle Boulevard this internationally known firm relocated to an out of town industrial complex. Its site is now occupied by high quality apartments. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

72 The Canal Corridor and Castle Marina The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

73 The Nottingham Canal Corridor Redevelopment. The canal side route was refurbished in the late 1990s. As a green route from Nottingham to Beeston via Lenton which could be used by cyclists and pedestrians. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

74 Nottingham Canal – looking west The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

75 Nottingham from Castle Meadow looking east The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

76 Castle Meadow Retail Park This Retail Park is part of the much larger mixed development that has taken place on the site of the Nottingham railway sidings in the last twenty years. The site not only provides a retail experience but also has offices, hotels, restaurants, a marina and many different types of residential properties including a gated community. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

77 Castle Marina – Castle Meadow – constructed on the Nottingham Canal The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

78 NG2 The redevelopment of a factory site The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

79 NG 2 The redevelopment and branding of the Royal Ordnance Factory site – a extension to the CBD. This site was meadow land until 1915 when a large munitions factory was constructed here to produce shell cases for the First World War bombardment. Many unemployed lace workers, especially women were employed. NG2 redevelopment site The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

80 NG2 NG2 has been developed on the site of the Royal Ordnance Factory as an extension to a corridor which runs from the city centre. This is a mixed development of businesses and retain outlets [Homebase] The area has been designed for easy access and is on the route of the tram line extension from the railway Station. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

81 Castle Meadow The Castle viewed from the south – unknown date Source: Nottingham City Library The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

82 Ordnance factory Nottingham Castle The Park Map to show the ROF site in NG2 The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

83 30 September 1915 Royal Ordnance Factory Castle Meadow – Right Above- The production of guns during the Second World War Source: Nottingham City Library The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

84 Examples of the uses now found on the ROF site including Experian – the credit rating agency. Almost as many people are employed on this site now as were employed by the Royal Ordnance Factory. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

85 Castle Marina – Castle View The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

86 Castle Wharf From industry to apartments, civic buildings and entertainment The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

87 View Nottingham by Joseph Mallord William Turner which shows the Castle Wharf area searchid=25313&tabview=image The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

88 1923 Castle Warf – Looking North towards the Castle – showing part of the railway good yard and the Gunn and Moore Factory The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

89 Nottingham Canal - redevelopment The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

90 Inland Revenue Headquarters Hopkins Architects The move to decentralise many of the Governments functions resulted in this development which was the result of an architectural competition. Six blocks and an amenity building were constructed employing 2000 people. Tree lined streets provide for car parking. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

91 Inland Revenue Headquarters Government relocated several departments from London – this is an example employees were relocated to this site. The original plans for the site were strongly opposed and resulted in a competition – this is the result. Designed by Hopkins Architects the building complements the castle in its design with round turrets and several different blocks. The building was designed to be environmentally friendly too. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

92 Inland Revenue Headquarters Utility building The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

93 British Waterways warehouse Built 1919 as part of the City Redevelopment plan. Now converted into offices, restaurants and apartments – by Franklin Ellis The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

94 Magistrates Courts Complex The Magistrates Courts were moved from a Victorian building to the North of the city centre to this canal side location – The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

95 Fellows Morton and Clayton The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

96 Little Venice Its Just like Venice – Paul Morel – Sons and Lovers Like many cities Nottingham rediscovered its waterfront in the 1970s and was tidied up making it much more attractive to developers. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

97 Fellows Morton and Clayton The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

98 How do we measure redevelopment? Sustainability – Environment – of building, of its use, of getting to it, Social – Impact on people as a place of employment, entertainment Economic – Costs and benefits, employment Political / Cultural – Respect for the cultural, are people happy about it – what do they think? Physical impact – on the area Site – How does it relate to its site The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

99 Produced by P. S. Fox. MMX The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX


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