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Initial research and compilation by Ms. Victoria Ayre, DA Déjà vu.

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Presentation on theme: "Initial research and compilation by Ms. Victoria Ayre, DA Déjà vu."— Presentation transcript:

1 Initial research and compilation by Ms. Victoria Ayre, DA Déjà vu

2 Déjà vu or Already seen Paramnesia Paramnesia - from the Greeks An individual feels as though an event has already happened or has happened in the recent past. déjà vu The feeling of déjà vu is usually accompanied by a compelling sense of familiarity and a sense of eeriness The previous experience is frequently characterized to real life.

3 Émile Boirac ( ) French psychic researcher Déjà vu Déjà vu coined after an essay in his book, "L'Avenir des sciences psychiques ("The Future of Psychic Sciences) déjà vu Literature in past references déjà vu, indicating it is not a new phenomenon

4 Three Types of Déjà vu Déjà vecu already experienced or lived through Déjà vecu (already experienced or lived through) Otherwise known as déjà vu, experiences occur more frequently between the ages of 15 and 25 Otherwise known as déjà vu, experiences occur more frequently between the ages of 15 and 25 The events are so striking that they are often remembered for years to come The events are so striking that they are often remembered for years to come

5 Three Types of Déjà vu Déjà senti already felt Déjà senti (already felt) *Appears in temporal lobe epilepsy attacks *Primarily--or even exclusively--a mental happening *There are no precognitive aspects in which the person feels he or she knows in advance what will be said or done *It seldom or never remains in the afflicted person's memory afterwards

6 Three Types of Déjà vu Déjà visite already visited Déjà visite (already visited) Seems to occur more rarely and is an experience in which a person visits a new locality and nevertheless feels it to be familiar Seems to occur more rarely and is an experience in which a person visits a new locality and nevertheless feels it to be familiar Déjà visitehas to do with geography, with the three spatial dimensions of height, width and depth, while deja vecu has to do more with temporal occurrences and processes Déjà visite has to do with geography, with the three spatial dimensions of height, width and depth, while deja vecu has to do more with temporal occurrences and processes C.G. Ju ng published an account on Déjà visitein his account on synchronicity C.G. Ju ng published an account on Déjà visite in his account on synchronicity

7 Scientific Research 70% of people report having experienced déjà vu at least once 70% of people report having experienced déjà vu at least once Experiencing déjà vu is quite common among adults and children alike Experiencing déjà vu is quite common among adults and children alike Difficult to evoke déjà vu experience in laboratory settings Difficult to evoke déjà vu experience in laboratory settings Researchers are using science to recreate the sensation of déjà vu Researchers are using science to recreate the sensation of déjà vu

8 Subject to psychological and neuropsychological research Déjà vu anomaly of memory Déjà vu is an anomaly of memory Sense of recollection at the time is strong and circumstances of previous experience are uncertain F i r s t T h e o r y…

9 S e c o n d T h e o r y… Vision is being explored Vision is being explored One eye may record what is seen faster than the other One eye may record what is seen faster than the other Creates that "strong recollection" sensation upon the "same" scene being viewed milliseconds later by the opposite eye Creates that "strong recollection" sensation upon the "same" scene being viewed milliseconds later by the opposite eye

10 Déjà vu Linked With Disorders Pharmacology certain drugs increase the chances of déjà vu Hyperdopaminergic Pharmacology Reports say that certain drugs increase the chances of déjà vu occurring in the user. Hyperdopaminergic action in the mesial temporal areas of the brain Memory-based explanations Memory trace may lead to the sensation Cryptamnesia Memory trace may lead to the sensation. Cryptamnesia: information learned is forgotten yet stored in the brain, and occurrence of similarities invokes the contained knowledge, leading to a feeling of familiarity because of the situation, event or emotional/vocal content Neural theories mis-timing of neuronal firing Could be caused by the mis-timing of neuronal firing. Split second re-start to the neural system

11 Alternative Explanations For Déjà vu Parapsychology - cited for evidence of psychic abilities Dreams - déjà vu may be the memory of dreams Reincarnation - déjà vu may be caused by fragments of past life memories being jarred to the surface of the mind by familiar surroundings or people

12 Déjà vu and its Relatives Jamais vu 1) Jamais vu, never seen in French Used to describe any familiar situation which is not recognized by the observer Described as opposite of déjà vu

13 Déjà vu and its Relatives 2) Presque vu 2) Presque vu,almost seen in French When one cannot recall a familiar word or name or situation, but with effort one eventually recalls the elusive memory tip of the tongue Also called tip of the tongue Sensation of being on the brink of an epiphany 3) L'esprit de l'escalier 3) L'esprit de l'escalier, staircase wit in French Remembering something when it is too late

14 Déjà vu Déjà vu feeling is common among psychiatric patients Déjà vu Déjà vu feeling also frequently precedes temporal lobe epilepsy attacks Experiment in 1955 Electrically stimulated the temporal lobes and found that about 8% of his patients experienced memories With this, he assumed he elicited actual memories déjà vu However, these could have been the first signs of artificially stimulated déjà vu The Déjà Vu Feeling

15 How does it work? There are portions of the brain that are specialized for the past, the present and the future. The temporal lobes are concerned with the past, the frontal lobes are concerned with the future, and the underlying, intermediate portions (the limbic system) are concerned with the present. The structure that overwhelms our consciousness when we are 'in the present is the amygdala. It assigns an emotional 'tone' to our perceptions. The amygdala also recognizes expressions on people's faces.

16 How does it work? Each instance the self is able to manifest a new emotional response, but only if circumstances have changed. –Every 25 milliseconds. –The duration of the 'present' in neurological terms is so brief that we don't experience it so much as remember it.

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18 Interesting Facts déjà vuThe youngest age of déjà vu reported is age 5. This has major theoretical implications for cognitive development. There is a complex interchange with age and incidence based on quality of remembering.

19 Interesting Facts déjà vuThere is no single theoretical cause of déjà vu that can explain its wide variety of clinical manifestations. déjà vuMost instances of associative déjà vu are connected with a predisposing milieu of anxiety and are triggered by restricted paramnesia and reintegration.

20 Interesting Facts déjà vuThere are 21 kinds of déjà vu. There is also a metaphorical journalistic use of the term. déjà vuThe common occurrence of déjà vu in the general population stresses the need for the development of specific qualitative features for valuable diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy.

21 Interesting Facts There are 7 major phenomenological classifications of the déjà vu experienceThere are 7 major phenomenological classifications of the déjà vu experience: –disorder of memory –disorder of ego state –ego defense –temporal perceptual disturbance –recognition disorder –manifestation of epileptic firing –subjective paranormal experience

22 Right now, Im having amnesia and déjà vu at the same time, I think Ive forgotten this before, –Steve Wright

23 Sources _vuhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%A9j%C3%A 0_vu


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