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Delaware Social Studies Standards History Standard 1: Chronology History Standard 2: Analysis History Standard 3: Interpretation History Standard 4: Content.

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Presentation on theme: "Delaware Social Studies Standards History Standard 1: Chronology History Standard 2: Analysis History Standard 3: Interpretation History Standard 4: Content."— Presentation transcript:

1 Delaware Social Studies Standards History Standard 1: Chronology History Standard 2: Analysis History Standard 3: Interpretation History Standard 4: Content

2 History Standard 3 Grades 9-12: Students will compare competing historical narratives by contrasting different historians choice of questions, use and choice of sources, perspectives, beliefs, and points of view in order to demonstrate how these factors contribute to different interpretations.

3 Changing Interpretations of Reconstruction Four schools of thought

4 Traditional (first half of 20 th century) South accepted defeat; ready to be reintegrated into Union. Wise and generous policies of Lincoln and Johnson were thwarted by Radical Republicans An era ruined by corrupt scalawags, greedy carpetbaggers, and ignorant freedmen. Reconstruction ended when white southerners banded together to restore HOME RULE.

5 Traditional Reconstruction was… A dramatic change for the worse.

6 Dissenting (first half of 20 th century) Black scholars, such as W.E.B. Du Bois, argued that white historians had ignored the most important people in the story of Reconstruction: Freed Slaves. Reconstruction was a noble attempt to establish real democracy in the South. Largely ignored by white historians.

7 Revisionist (1960s) Reconstruction achieved successes: Public school systems Equal citizenship for black men Efforts to revive Southern economy Reconstruction governments not any more corrupt than those in the North.

8 Revisionist Reconstruction was… A dramatic change for the better.

9 Post-Revisionist (1970s-1980s) Challenged the optimism of the Civil Rights Era. Reconstruction was a continuation of the antebellum (pre-Civil War) South. Wealthy whites continued to exploit poor blacks through legal (Jim Crow Laws) and illegal (Ku Klux Klan) means.

10 Post-Revisionist Reconstruction was… Not enough change.

11 Today… Historians continue to re-evaluate Reconstruction.

12 SOURCES Images: Americas Library Reconstruction: The Second Civil War The History of Jim Crow Historiography: Eric Foner, A Short History of Reconstruction


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