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Leadership Styles. Leadership Style (Emotional Intelligence Perspective) Leadership That Gets Results, Daniel Goleman, Harvard Business Review, March-April.

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Presentation on theme: "Leadership Styles. Leadership Style (Emotional Intelligence Perspective) Leadership That Gets Results, Daniel Goleman, Harvard Business Review, March-April."— Presentation transcript:

1 Leadership Styles

2 Leadership Style (Emotional Intelligence Perspective) Leadership That Gets Results, Daniel Goleman, Harvard Business Review, March-April 2000.

3 Leadership Style Coercive: Coercive: Modus operandi: Demands immediate compliance Modus operandi: Demands immediate compliance The style in a phrase: Do what I tell you. The style in a phrase: Do what I tell you. Underlying emotional intelligence: Drive to achieve, initiate, self-control Underlying emotional intelligence: Drive to achieve, initiate, self-control When style works best: In a crisis, to kick start a turnaround, or with problem employees When style works best: In a crisis, to kick start a turnaround, or with problem employees Overall impact on climate: Negative Overall impact on climate: Negative

4 Leadership Style Authoritative: Authoritative: Modus operandi: Mobilizes people toward a vision Modus operandi: Mobilizes people toward a vision The style in a phrase: Come with me. The style in a phrase: Come with me. Underlying emotional intelligence: Self-confidence, empathy, change catalyst Underlying emotional intelligence: Self-confidence, empathy, change catalyst When style works best: When changes require a new vision, or a clear direction is needed When style works best: When changes require a new vision, or a clear direction is needed Overall impact on climate: Most strongly positive Overall impact on climate: Most strongly positive

5 Leadership Style Democratic: Democratic: Modus operandi: Forges consensus through participation Modus operandi: Forges consensus through participation The style in a phrase: What do you think? The style in a phrase: What do you think? Underlying emotional intelligence: Collaboration, team leadership, communication Underlying emotional intelligence: Collaboration, team leadership, communication When style works best: To build buy-in or consensus, or to get input from valuable employees When style works best: To build buy-in or consensus, or to get input from valuable employees Overall impact on climate: Positive Overall impact on climate: Positive

6 Leadership Style Affiliative: Affiliative: Modus operandi: Creates harmony and builds emotional bonds Modus operandi: Creates harmony and builds emotional bonds The style in a phrase: People come first. The style in a phrase: People come first. Underlying emotional intelligence: Empathy, building relationships, communication Underlying emotional intelligence: Empathy, building relationships, communication When style works best: To heal rifts in a team or to motivate people during stressful circumstances When style works best: To heal rifts in a team or to motivate people during stressful circumstances Overall impact on climate: Positive Overall impact on climate: Positive

7 Leadership Style Pacesetting: Pacesetting: Modus operandi: Sets high standard of performance Modus operandi: Sets high standard of performance The style in a phrase: Do as I do, now. The style in a phrase: Do as I do, now. Underlying emotional intelligence: Conscientiousness, drive to achieve, initiative Underlying emotional intelligence: Conscientiousness, drive to achieve, initiative When style works best: To get quick results from a highly motivated and competent team When style works best: To get quick results from a highly motivated and competent team Overall impact on climate: Negative Overall impact on climate: Negative

8 Leadership Style Coaching: Coaching: Modus operandi: Develops people for the future. Modus operandi: Develops people for the future. The style in a phrase: Try this. The style in a phrase: Try this. Underlying emotional intelligence: Developing others, empathy, self-awareness Underlying emotional intelligence: Developing others, empathy, self-awareness When style works best: To help employee improve performance or develop long-term strengths When style works best: To help employee improve performance or develop long-term strengths Overall impact on climate: Positive Overall impact on climate: Positive

9 The Lesson Different strokes for different folks. Different strokes for different folks. Leaders must be flexible and change their styles according to the situation and the people. Leaders must be flexible and change their styles according to the situation and the people. Situational leadership. Situational leadership.

10 Old Style vs. New Style Heroic (Old) Heroic (Old) 1. Managers are important people, quite apart from others who develop products and deliver services. 2. The higher up these managers go, the more important they become. At the top, the chief executive is the corporation. Engaging (New) 1. Managers are important to the extent that they help other people who develop products and deliver services to be important. 2. An organization is an interacting network, not a vertical hierarchy. Effective leaders work throughout; they do not sit on top. Henry Mintzberg. Managers Not MBAs San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

11 Heroic (Old)Engaging (New) 3. Down the hierarchy comes the strategyclear, deliberate, and bold emanating from the chief who takes the dramatic acts. Everyone else implements. 4. Implementation is the problem because while the chief embraces change, most others resist it. That is why outsiders must be favored over insiders. 3. Out of the network emerge strategies, as engaged people solve little problems that grow into big initiatives. 4. Implementation is the problem because it cannot be separated from formulation. That is why committed insiders are necessary to resist ill- considered changes imposed from above and without.

12 Heroic (Old)Engaging (New) 5. To manage is to make decisions and allocate resourcesincluding those human resources. Managing thus means analyzing, often calculating, based on facts in reports. 6. Rewards for increased performance go to the leadership. What matters is whats measured. 5. To manage is to bring out the positive energy that exists naturally within people. Managing thus means engaging, based on judgment, rooted in context. 6. Rewards for making the organization a better place go to everyone. Human values matter, few of which can be measured.

13 Heroic (Old)Engaging (New) 7. Leadership is thrust upon those who thrust their will on others. 7. Leadership is a sacred trust earned from the respect of others.


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