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Upac-folpha crime prevention summit May 25,2002 Crime Monitoring & Reporting Many crimes not reported to the police police do not always act officially.

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Presentation on theme: "Upac-folpha crime prevention summit May 25,2002 Crime Monitoring & Reporting Many crimes not reported to the police police do not always act officially."— Presentation transcript:

1 upac-folpha crime prevention summit May 25,2002 Crime Monitoring & Reporting Many crimes not reported to the police police do not always act officially on reported crimes lack of or inaccurate data impairs decisions & reforms in CJ system To give leading / lagging indicators of crime trends & identify factors to aid efficiency of police & other law enforcers to help programs & policies for prevention

2 upac-folpha crime prevention summit May 25,2002 Crimes base on number of victims (source : 2001 UN-NAPOLCOM Philippine Victimization Study ) Majority of crimes are econogenic in nature Top three (3) crimes: –personal theft (13.2%- half from snatching / pickpockets) –burglary (3.27%-most common:cash,applian- ces, animals) –attempted burglary (2.73%) Vehicle theft statistics: –17.42% of owners are victims of theft from cars –6.45% are carnapping victims –11.6% of bicycle / pedicab owners are victims of theft

3 upac-folpha crime prevention summit May 25,2002 Other increasing crimes Consumer fraud & corruption (19.98%- tampered weight scales) Personal theft (5.27%) Bribing officials to facilitate transactions / avail discounts in paying citizens dues Low reporting percentage observed from victims of crime ONLY 15.17% OF VICTIMS REPORT TO THE POLICE

4 upac-folpha crime prevention summit May 25,2002 Reasons for not reporting Did not consider the crime serious enough / considered the incident as petty / or there was no loss Police could not do anything due to lack of proof or evidence. (victims are aware if evidence is weak nothing will come out of complaint) Assault / threat victims know offender personal attachment discourages referral of petty disputes Victims of sexual incidents consider it a personal / family affair

5 upac-folpha crime prevention summit May 25,2002 Most common reported crimes Most common reported involve big amounts of losses or those that inflicted serious physical harm Crimes against property are reported to recover property & see offender punished Half of assault / threat victims believe that the offenders should be made aware that the incident should not be repeated

6 upac-folpha crime prevention summit May 25,2002 Seriousness of crime a major factor in reporting General perception that seriousness of crimes largely depend on the amount of loss or extent of damage from the incident But a good number also consider amount of loss less important than the safety of their selves of families 50% of victims of sexual incidences & 66.61% of car vandalism regard the violation as not very serious (vs. property, theft, burglary)

7 upac-folpha crime prevention summit May 25,2002 Victim Support Most are not provided by professional agencies tasked for the job Tendency towards personalism & family ties, friends, neighbors Only minimal admitted getting help from the police, barangay officials & social welfare only 10% of victims consider specialized agencies useful (ie. DSWD, NBI, etc…)

8 upac-folpha crime prevention summit May 25,2002 Perception towards Police Majority assessed the police is doing a fairly good job in crime prevention efforts Police patrols & visibility at least once a day is most common deterrent & are helpful But majority also perceive that most crimes occur due to police inaction or connivance (SWS)

9 upac-folpha crime prevention summit May 25,2002 Most common crime prevention 48% of burglary victims have door locks while 36.5% have window grills 26.73% see the importance of neighborhood watch 46.27% maintain watchdogs Other measures adopted include high fences, employing caretakers, security guards & installing burglar alarms.

10 upac-folpha crime prevention summit May 25,2002 How to report: Five (5) Ws What (type of crime / incident) Where (location/time) Who (victim/s & perpetrator/s) Why (reason/s) How (other details of incident) Depending on time sensitivity: –By landline –By oral report –By written report –By cell phone (voice or SMS) –others

11 upac-folpha crime prevention summit May 25,2002 Who & Where to report: Barangay officials Local & national police other law enforcers (ie. NBI, NDEP etc…) neighbors / friends / relatives anti crime groups- NGOs/ parish / media Streetwatch 117 Police Assistance 166 CAPCOM (NCRPO)-7575 ANCAR 7570 Bantay Bata 163 Fire Fighters MERALCO Manila H2O / Maynilad 1627 /1626 Poison Control Civil Defense Metro Rescue 365 NDEP local Police Community Precinct


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