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Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline results from the 2005 survey.

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Presentation on theme: "Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline results from the 2005 survey."— Presentation transcript:

1 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline results from the 2005 survey

2 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Reminder – Core Offences The 20 core offences are grouped into the following categories: -Property related offences include: - burglary (domestic and commercial) - vehicle-related thefts - other thefts - criminal damage -Violent offences include: - robbery and assault -Drug selling offences include: - selling class A and other drugs

3 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Extent of Offending in the last 12 months - A quarter of young people (25%) aged from 10 – 25 had committed at least one core offence.

4 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Offending by sex………and age < Any offence AssaultOther thefts Criminal damage Selling drugs Vehicle- related thefts BurglaryRobbery MaleFemale to 1112 to 1314 to 1516 to 1718 to 1920 to 2122 to 2324 to 25 Male Female

5 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Profile of offences

6 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Other offences – stolen goods and racial/religious attacks -20% of 12 to 25 yr olds had handled (bought or sold) stolen goods in the last 12 months. 7% had bought, 19% had stolen. Males were more likely than females to have handled stolen goods in the last 12 months (24% vs 16%) -Less than 1% of 10 to 25 yr olds said they had physically attacked someone because of their skin colour, race or religion in the last 12 months.

7 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Other offences – carrying weapons - 4% of young people had carried a knife / <1% had carried a gun - For both knife and gun carrying, the peak age was 16 to 17 yrs (7% and 1%) - Males were more likely to carry a knife (5% vs 2%) - 85% who carried a knife did so mainly for protection & 9% in case of a fight - 7% who carried a knife had used it to threaten someone, 2% to injure someone 10% 20% 29% 41% 0%10%20%30%40%50% Kitchen knife Other type of knife Flick knife Pen knife Type of knife carried -

8 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Risk factors for Offending – 10 – 15 yr olds yr olds Factors showing association 1 Committed anti-social behaviour in the last 12 months Victim of personal crime Have been drunk once a month or more in last 12 months Friends/siblings have been in trouble with the police Taken drugs in the last 12 months Having been suspended or expelled from school Parents have been in trouble with the police More likely to agree criminal acts are OK Spends little or no time with parents/guardians Factors showing association 1 Victim of personal crime Committed anti-social behaviour in last 12 months Friends/siblings have been in trouble with the police More likely to agree criminal acts are OK Taken any drug in last 12 months Male Highly impulsive Ever been expelled or suspended Age 16 to 19 Have been drunk once a month or more in last 12 months Parents have been in trouble with police

9 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Anti Social Behaviour and Offending –23% of respondents had committed at least one of the four anti-social behaviours in the previous 12 months. –Being noisy or rude in public (15%) and behaving in a way that caused a neighbour complaint (12%) were the most common anti-social behaviours committed. Graffiti and racial/religious motivated abuse were relatively rare at 3% and 2% respectively. –Younger respondents were significantly more likely than older respondents to have been involved in ASB and/or offending in the last 12 months (39% and 34% respectively) –Overall, 64% of young people had not committed a core offence or asb in the last 12 months 39%34%

10 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Offending and Drug Use –Young people who took drugs in the last 12 months were significantly more likely (than those who did not) to have committed an offence. –Just under half (46%) of those who had taken any drug in the last 12 months had committed an offence vs 19% who had not taken any drug.

11 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Contact with the CJS –4% of all 10 to 25 yr olds had been arrested in the last 12 months, 2% had been to court accused of committing a criminal offence and 1% had been given a community/custodial sentence or fine. –The group reporting the highest level of contact with the CJS in the last 12 months were males aged from 18 – 25, of whom 5% had been arrested, 3% had been taken to court and 2% had been given a fine, community or custodial sentence. –Overall, 10% of 10 to 25 yr olds had been cautioned, reprimanded or received a final warning in their lifetime. The older age group (18 – 25 yr olds) were significantly more likely than younger respondents to have ever received a caution, reprimand or final warning.

12 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Other problem behaviours –22% reported committing fare evasion in the last 12 months. This figure was highest for among 16 to 17 yr olds (40%) followed by 34% for 18 to 19 yr olds. –9% of 10 to 16 yr olds had truanted in the last 12 months. Higher for older age groups (<1% of yr olds, 18% of 16 yr olds). No difference between males and females. However, if offended in last 12 months, significantly more likely to truant than non-offenders (18% vs 6%). –Joyriding relatively rare – 1% in last 12 months. –7% of all yr olds had driven without insurance or a valid driving licence in the last 12 months. 4% had been fined or found guilty of speeding and 10% had driven when they thought they may be over the legal alcohol limit. Males more likely than females to commit driving offences.

13 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Extent of Personal Victimisation –Just over a quarter of young people (27%) had been personally victimised in the last 12 months. –Younger respondents were more likely to have been a victim than older respondents (31% vs 25%) and males were significantly more likely to be a victim of a personal crime than females (32% vs 22%). –The most common forms of victimisation were assault without injury (11%) and other personal thefts (9%) – both forms most common amongst 10 to 15 yr olds. –Personal thefts from 10 – 25 yr olds were more likely to involve theft of stationary and sports equipment an to have occurred at school compared with incidents against 16 – 25 yr olds. 16 to 25 yr olds were more likely to experience thefts of money, mobile phones or credit/debit cards than younger respondents.

14 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Offending and Victimisation –Weve already seen that 25% of respondents committed a core offence and that 27% of respondents were a victim of a crime in the previous 12 months. –However, 52% of offenders had also been victims, which is considerably higher than the 23% seen for non offenders who were victims. –Additionally, young people (10 to 15) were significantly more likely to be a victim of a crime (16%) compared to older respondents (13%) and were also significantly more likely to be both a victim and an offender (15%) in the previous 12 months, compared to older respondents (16 to %).

15 Offending Crime and Justice Survey Headline Results – 2005 Survey Jane Ashe Thats all folks…… Jane Ashe: Tel –


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