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McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2008 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Providing Orientation and Training Training is important to.

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Presentation on theme: "McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2008 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Providing Orientation and Training Training is important to."— Presentation transcript:

1 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2008 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Providing Orientation and Training Training is important to continuous improvement because of the change that is taking place around us. You need to be aware of that change, and you need to be continually growing to adapt to it. —Peter Kortier, plant training leader, Libbey, Inc. 16

2 16-2 Learning Objectives 1.Summarize reasons for conducting an orientation for new employees. 2.Discuss how a supervisor and the human resources department can work together to conduct an orientation. 3.Identify methods for conducting an orientation. 4.Describe the training cycle. 5.Explain how supervisors can decide when employees need training. 6.Define major types of training. 7.Describe how a supervisor can use coaching and mentoring to support training. 8.Discuss how a supervisor can evaluate the effectiveness of training.

3 16-3 Overview Supervisors are responsible for making sure their employees know what to do and how to do it. Training is a major expense. Employee training, however it is conducted, meets important needs.

4 16-4 New Employee Orientation Supervisors should assume that all employees need some form of orientation. Orientation refers to the process of giving new employees the information they need to do their work comfortably, effectively, and efficiently. Supervisors must ensure that their employees begin their jobs with all the information they need.

5 16-5 Benefits of Orientation Communicates basic job-related information to employees so they can become productive sooner Reduces employee nervousness and uncertainty Encourages employees to develop a positive attitude Can strengthen positive work relationships

6 16-6 The Supervisor’s Role In a small organization, supervisors often are responsible for conducting orientation. Large organizations usually have a formal orientation program conducted by human resources. Supervisors must still convey information about job specifics.

7 16-7 Orientation Topics Organization policies and procedures Tax and insurance forms Job particulars How departmental activities lead to organizational goals Instructions on how to perform the job How the employee’s job contributes to meeting department and organizational objectives

8 16-8 Orientation Methods Employee handbook Tour of the facilities Involvement of co-workers Follow-up

9 16-9 The Training Cycle

10 16-10 The Training Cycle (continued) Assessment of training needs Planning steps: Set objectives that are written, measurable, clear, specific, and challenging but achievable Decide who will participate Choose training methods Implementation

11 16-11 Assessment of Training Needs Supervisors are responsible for assessing training needs even if they don’t conduct it. Needs assessment should be an ongoing concern for supervisors. To identify training needs: Observe problems in the department that suggest a need for training. Evaluate areas of change, considering what new knowledge and skills employees will need. Ask employees. Consider needs during departmental planning.

12 16-12 Assessment of Training Needs (continued) Mandatory training: Government regulations Union work rules Company policy Learning environment: Foster a climate that values learning Set a good example Share information

13 16-13 Types of Training On-the-job training Apprenticeship Cross-training Vestibule training Classroom training Computer-based instruction Role playing Basic-skills training

14 Major Advantages of E-Learning 1.Real-time learning and application of critical knowledge 2.Learner-centric training 3.Ability to attract, train, and retain employees 4.Personalized training 5.Ownership of learning 6.Simulation 7.Collaboration 8.Ability to train anytime and anywhere 9.Cost effectiveness 10.Quantifiable results

15 16-15 Coaching to Support Training As a coach, supervisors engage in: Regular observation Teaching Encouragement Coaching Guidance and instruction on how to do a job so that it satisfies performance goals.

16 16-16 The Coaching Process

17 16-17 Mentoring Focused on one employee Should not exclude all other employees in the work group For employees who: Have great potential Need extra attention Have specifically been assigned to the supervisor Mentoring Providing guidance, advice, and encouragement through an ongoing one-on-one work relationship.

18 16-18 Mentoring (continued) Mentor activities: Act as a sounding board Share knowledge and experience Guide employees to discover the results of their own behavior Share organizational opportunities

19 16-19 Evaluation of Training Was the trainer well prepared? Did the trainer communication the information clearly and in an interesting way? Did the training include visual demonstrations in addition to verbal descriptions of how to do the task? Were the employees well enough prepared for the training program? Did the employees understand how they would benefit from the training? Did employees have a chance to ask questions? Did the employees receive plenty of praise for their progress?

20 16-20 Summary The sooner new employees know basic information related to their job, the sooner they can become productive. No matter who conducts an orientation, it is up to the supervisor to convey specific job information. Orientation methods include: employee handbook, tour of the facilities, involvement of co-workers, follow-up. The training cycle: assess training needs, set objectives, determine participants, choose a training method. With input from the employees, supervisors should determine the areas of training that employees will need and schedule it.

21 16-21 Summary (continued) There are many types of employee training available; most organizations use a variety of training methods. To help employees maintain and use the skills they have acquired, a supervisor takes on the role of coach, guiding and instructing employees in how to do a job so that it satisfies performance goals. A supervisor may act as a mentor to an employee, providing guidance, advice, and encouragement through an ongoing one-on-one work relationship. To evaluate training, a supervisor measures whether the problem addressed by the training is being solved.


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