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ELA Shifts 1 and 3 Sometimes I sum up the standards by saying, read like a detective and write like an investigative reporter. More and more I feel like.

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Presentation on theme: "ELA Shifts 1 and 3 Sometimes I sum up the standards by saying, read like a detective and write like an investigative reporter. More and more I feel like."— Presentation transcript:

1 ELA Shifts 1 and 3 Sometimes I sum up the standards by saying, read like a detective and write like an investigative reporter. More and more I feel like I should say, Read like a detective and write like a conscientious investigative reporter. - David Coleman, Bringing the Common Core to Life

2 Agenda: Morning Session 8:30-9:00 Welcome/Introduction ELA Common Core Treasure Hunt 9:00-10:00 Session I Group AGroup B Shifts: 1 & 3 Shifts: 4, 5, & 6 10:00-10:15 Break 10:15-11:15 Session II Group A Group B Shifts: 4, 5, & 6 Shifts 1 & 3 11:15-11:30 Wrap-Up Curriculum Mapping Input Afternoon Session 12:30-1:00 Welcome/Introduction ELA Common Core Treasure Hunt 1:00-2:00 Session I Group A Group B Shifts: 1 & 3 Shifts: 4, 5, & 6 2:00-2:15 Break 2:15-3:15 Session II Group A Group B Shifts: 4, 5, & 6 Shifts 1 & 3 3:15-3:30 Wrap-Up Curriculum Mapping Input

3 Clear Learning Targets I can balance the amount of literature and informational text in my classroom. (Shift 1) I can use three measures to analyze text complexity. (Shift 3)

4 Treasure Hunt Knowing where to find information is just as important as knowing the information. A question can be answered effectively when one knows how to use the available tools. Use your treasure map to navigate the ELA Common Core State Standards.

5 Word Bank: ClustersLanguageWriting 10 Craft and Structure StandardsSpeaking and Listening Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas 10Language Production & Distribution of Writing Range of Writing K-5 Phonics and Word Recognition Phonological Awareness Vocabulary Acquisition and Use 6 Range of Reading and Lvl of Text Complexity FluencyConventions of Standard English Print Concepts 6Comprehension and Collaboration Research to Build and Present knowledge Integration of knowledge and Ideas

6 AnswerKeyAnswerKey

7 Six Shifts in ELA Common Core The new English Language Arts Common Core State Standards contain many changes in learning standards, but they can be grouped into 6 main shifts. The shifts are directly linked to the College and Career Readiness Standards. Shift 1: Balance of literature and information text (K-5) *50% of information text by 4th grade Shift 2: Literacy across all content areas (6-12) Shift 3: Staircase of complexity Shift 4: Question and Answers: text-dependent Shift 5: Writing to inform or argue using evidences Shift 6: Academic Vocabulary

8 Shift 1: Balance of Literature and Informational Text I can balance the amount of literature and informational text in my classroom.

9 What is Shift 1? Balance of literature and informational text (K-5) -50% of information text by 4th grade Students read a true balance of informational and literary texts. Elementary school classrooms are, therefore, places where students access the world – science, social studies, the arts and literature – through text. At least 50% of what students read is informational. Anchor Standards R.I 1-10 R.L 1-10

10 Shift 1: Guiding Questions 1. What will this mean we have to change about our practice? 2. What challenges will we face as we make this shift? 3. What are the implications for my classroom/school as we implement Shift 1?

11 Why is Shift 1 so important? 80% of text adults read is informational, 80% of text read in school is literary. National Geographic School Publishing 2003 Informational texts have a variety of formats, most of which are different from literary texts. Reading informational texts requires different reading strategies and apply those strategies differently Informational Texts and literary text are written and read for different purposes.

12 Nonfiction Text Structures Description Compare/Contrast Cause and Effect Chronology/Sequence Procedural Persuasive Question/Answer Problem/Solution

13 Signal Words Point the Way… Text Structure & Signal Words Description/ Hierarchical List Cause & Effect Compare/ Contrast Problem/ Solution Question & Answer Sequence For instance For example Furthermore Such as Also To begin with Most important Also In fact In addition And to illustrate Since Because This led to On account of Due to As a result of For this reason Consequentially Then…so… Therefore thus In like manner Likewise Similar to The difference between As opposed to After all However And yet But Nevertheless On the other hand One reason for the… A solution A problem Where The question is One answer is Recommendations include How When What Next Why Who How many The best estimate It could be that One may conclude Until Before After Finally Lastly First…last… Now…then On (date) At (time) First, second Meanwhile Not long after initially

14

15 the features that identify nonfiction writing; the selective way nonfiction is read according to the readers purpose; the ways organizational features such as indexes, content pages, glossaries and headings help the reader access the text; the specialized language and language structures used to convey information; how visual literacy such as photographs, diagrams, maps and charts combine with written text to convey information;visual literacy how information in captions and labels combines with running text to convey information; strategies for using prior knowledge and experience to engage in inquiry To become effective readers of informational texts, students need to understand:

16 Shift 1: Fiction and Non-Fiction Use the cards at your table to complete the sort! LiteraryInformational

17

18 Shift 1: Putting it into Practice 1. Use the chart paper at your table to generate a list of informational texts types that you can use in your classroom. 2. Include a short description of how you will use it.

19 If we include more informational text in early schooling, we put children in a better position to handle the reading and writing demands of their later schooling. We would like to see a day when children read to learn and learn to read from the earliest days of schools and throughout their school careers. - Nell Duke

20 What the Student Does… What the Teacher Does… What the Principal Does… Build background knowledge and exposure to the world through reading Apply strategies to reading informational text Provide students equal #s of informational and literary texts Ensure coherent instruction about content Teach strategies for informational texts Teach through and with informational texts Scaffold for the difficulties that informational text present to students Ask students, What is connected here? How does this fit together? What details tell you that? Consider and inventory of informational text in your building. Consider purchasing equal amounts of informational and literacy text to students Ensure teacher accountability for building student content knowledge through text Provide opportunities for PD and co-planning for teachers to become more familiar with informational texts Shift 1: Balance of Literature and Informational Text

21 Shift 3: Staircase of Complexity I can use three measures to analyze text complexity.

22 What is Shift 3? Staircase of Complexity In order to prepare students for the complexity of college and career ready texts, each grade level requires a step of growth on the staircase. Students read the central, grade appropriate text around which instruction is centered. Teachers are patient, create more time and space in the curriculum for this close and careful reading, and provide appropriate and necessary scaffolding and supports so that it is possible for students reading below grade level. Anchor Standard R10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

23 Shift 3: Guiding Questions 1. What will this mean we have to change about our practice? 2. What challenges will we face as we make this shift?

24 Specifically, within reading standard #10: Anchor Standard: R.CCR.10Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. Example Grade-level Standard (2 nd grade and 4 th grade): RL.2.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories and poetry, in the grades 2–3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. RI.4.10By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. Source: Kansas State Department of Education Text Complexity 24

25 So… What do the Common Core Standards mean by text complexity? What is a text complexity band? and How do we ensure the texts our students are reading are in the appropriate text complexity band?

26 26 Source: Kansas State Department of Education Overview of Text Complexity Text complexity is defined by: Qualitative 2.Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands often best measured by an attentive human reader. Quantitative 1.Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity often best measured by computer software. Reader and Task 3.Reader and Task considerations – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned often best made by educators employing their professional judgment.

27 Text Complexity Grade Bands Suggested Lexile Range Suggested ATOS Book Level Range** K-1100L – 500L*1.0 – L – 790L2.0 – L – 980L3.0 – L – 1155L4.0 – L – 1305L4.6 – CCR1215L – 1355L4.8 – 12.0 Quantitative Measures Ranges for Text Complexity Grade Bands Common Core State Standards * The K-1 suggested Lexile range was not identified by the Common Core State Standards and was added by Kansas. ** Taken from Accelerated Reader and the Common Core State Standards, available at the following URL:

28 Where do we find texts in the appropriate text complexity band? Choose an excerpt of text from Appendix B: 28 We could…. or… Use available resources to determine the text complexity of other materials on our own. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

29 A Four-step Process: Determining Text Complexity 29 Quantitative Qualitative Reader and Task 4.Recommend placement in the appropriate text complexity band. 3.Reflect upon the reader and task considerations. 2.Analyze the qualitative measures of the text. 1.Determine the quantitative measures of the text. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

30 30 Measures such as: Word length Word frequency Word difficulty Sentence length Text length Text cohesion Step 1: Quantitative Measures Source: Kansas State Department of Education

31 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 31 The Quantitative Measures Ranges for Text Complexity : This document outlines the suggested ranges for each of the text complexity bands using: 1.Lexile Text Measures ---or--- 2.ATOS Book Levels (Accelerated Reader) Source: Kansas State Department of Education

32 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 32 Lets imagine we want to see where a text falls on the quantitative measures leg of the text complexity triangle, using either the Lexile text measures or the ATOS book level (or both). For illustrative purposes, lets choose Lois Lowrys 1989, Number the Stars. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

33 Finding a Lexile Measure for Text: /http://www.lexile.com/findabook / Step 1: Quantitative Measures 33

34 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 34 Number the Stars by: Lowry, LoisLowry, Lois It's 1943 Copenhagen and the Jews of Denmark are being "relocated," so Annemarie Johansen's best friend, L Number the Stars by: Lowry, LoisLowry, Lois It's 1943 Copenhagen and the Jews of Denmark are being "relocated," so Annemarie Johansen's best friend,...

35 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 35 For texts not in the Lexile database, consider using the Lexile Analyzer: Registration is required (free) Allows user to receive an estimated Lexile score Accommodates texts up to 1000 words in length Texts of any length can be evaluated using the Professional Lexile Analyzereducators can upgrade to this tool for free by requesting access Source: Kansas State Department of Education

36 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 36 Additional Resources for Lexile Measures: Overview video What Does the Lexile Measure Mean? Lexile Measures and the Common Core State Standards Source: Kansas State Department of Education

37 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 37 Finding a ATOS Book Level for Text:

38 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 38

39 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 39 For texts not in the AR Bookfinder database, consider using The ATOS Analyzer: No registration is required (however, you must provide an address to receive results) Three methods of analysis are available: 1.ATOS for Books – for submitting complete text of a book 2.ATOS for Books with Estimated Word Count – does not require full text, just three 150-word passages 3.ATOS for Text– works well for short, full-text submissions (short stories, magazine/newspaper articles, etc.) Source: Kansas State Department of Education

40 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 40 Additional Resources for ATOS Book Level Measures: Accelerated Reader Website Accelerated Reader and the Common Core State Standards Source: Kansas State Department of Education

41 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 41 Lexile Text Measure: ATOS Book Level: 670L 4.5 In which of the text complexity bands would this novel fall? Source: Kansas State Department of Education

42 Text Complexity Grade Bands Suggested Lexile Range Suggested ATOS Book Level Range** K-1100L – 500L*1.0 – L – 790L2.0 – L – 980L3.0 – L – 1155L4.0 – L – 1305L4.6 – CCR1215L – 1355L4.8 – 12.0 Quantitative Measures Ranges for Text Complexity Grade Bands Kansas Common Core Standards * The K-1 suggested Lexile range was not identified by the Common Core State Standards and was added by Kansas. ** Taken from Accelerated Reader and the Common Core State Standards, available at the following URL:

43 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 43 Remember, however, that the quantitative measures is only the first of three legs of the text complexity triangle. Our final recommendation may be validated, influenced, or even over-ruled by our examination of qualitative measures and the reader and task considerations. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

44 44 Step 2: Qualitative Measures Measures such as: Levels of meaning Levels of purpose Structure Organization Language conventionality Language clarity Prior knowledge demands Source: Kansas State Department of Education

45 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 45 The Qualitative Measures Rubrics for Literary and Informational Text : The rubric for literary text and the rubric for informational text allow educators to evaluate the important elements of text that are often missed by computer software that tends to focus on more easily measured factors. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

46 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 46 Because the factors for literary texts are different from information texts, these two rubrics contain different content. However, the formatting of each document is exactly the same. And because these factors represent continua rather than discrete stages or levels, numeric values are not associated with these rubrics. Instead, four points along each continuum are identified: high, middle high, middle low, and low. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

47 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 47 So… How is the rubric used? And how would Number the Stars fair when analyzed through the lens of the Literary Text Rubric? Source: Kansas State Department of Education

48 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 48

49 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 49 Lexile Text Measure: ATOS Book Level: 670L 4.5 From examining the quantitative measures, we knew: But after reflecting upon the qualitative measures, we believed: Source: Kansas State Department of Education

50 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 50 Quantitative Qualitative Reader and Task Our initial placement of Number the Stars into a text complexity band changed when we examined the qualitative measures. Remember, however, that we have completed only the first two legs of the text complexity triangle. The reader and task considerations still remain. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

51 51 Step 3: Reader and Task Considerations such as: Motivation Knowledge and experience Purpose for reading Complexity of task assigned regarding text Complexity of questions asked regarding text Source: Kansas State Department of Education

52 Step 3:Reader and Task Considerations 52 Questions for Professional Reflection on Reader and Task Considerations : The questions provided in this resource are meant to spur teacher thought and reflection upon the text, students, and any tasks associated with the text. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

53 Step 3:Reader and Task Considerations 53 The questions included here are largely open-ended questions without single, correct answers, but help educators to think through the implications of using a particular text in the classroom. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

54 Step 4: Recommended Placement 54 Recommended Placement After reflecting upon all three legs of the text complexity model we can make a final recommendation of placement within a text and begin to document our thinking for future reference. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

55 Step 4: Recommended Placement 55 Lexile Text Measure: ATOS Book Level: 670L 4.5 Source: Kansas State Department of Education

56 Step 4: Recommended Placement 56 Based upon all the informationall three legs of the modelthe final recommendation for Number the Stars is…. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

57 Step 4: Recommended Placement 57 Grades 2–3 Text Exemplars Stories Gannett, Ruth Stiles. My Fathers Dragon Averill, Esther. The Fire Cat Steig, William. Amos & Boris Shulevitz, Uri. The Treasure Cameron, Ann. The Stories Julian Tells MacLachlan, Patricia. Sarah, Plain and Tall Rylant, Cynthia. Henry and Mudge: The First Book of Their Adventures Stevens, Janet. Tops and Bottoms LaMarche, Jim. The Raft Rylant, Cynthia. Poppleton in Winter Rylant, Cynthia. The Lighthouse Family: The Storm Osborne, Mary Pope. The One-Eyed Giant (Book One of Tales from the Odyssey) Silverman, Erica. Cowgirl Kate and Cocoa COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects Appendix B: Text Exemplars and Sample Performance Tasks Source: Kansas State Department of Education

58 Step 4: Recommended Placement 58 Template for Text Complexity Analysis and Recommended Placement Form The one-page template provides an opportunity to record the thinking involved in recommending the placement of a specific text into a text complexity band. Keeping a record of such analysis and thinking might be useful documentation in the case that any questions arise in the future. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

59 Step 4: Recommended Placement 59 Source: Kansas State Department of Education

60

61 Shift 3: Putting it into Practice GROUP MATERIALS: Take the book from your folder and use the forms in the text complexity packet to determine a complexity band for that text. Work as a table group and fill out each form. Step 1: Quantitative Measure (Lexile or ATOS) is found on the sticky note inside the cover. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

62 Long Range Goal: 1. What is one complex text, possibly chosen from Appendix B of the Common Core around which we can build a unit this semester?Appendix B of the Common Core 2. What will we do less of in order to make room for the time it will take to read this text closely? 3. Which portions of the text should we focus on? 4. Which portions should we ask students to re-read multiple times? 5. What role can independent reading play in this unit for students who struggle to access the central text on their own? 6. What other supports will we need to provide for these students? 7. When was the last time I was challenged by a text? 8. What did I do to handle/ manage/ work within that frustration?

63 What the Student Does… What the Teacher Does… What the Principal Does… Read to see what more they can find and learn as they re-read texts again and again Read material at own level to build joy of reading and pleasure in the world Be persistent despite challenges when reading; good readers tolerate frustration Ensure students are engaged in more complex texts at every grade level Engage students in rigorous conversation Provide experience with complex texts Give students less to read, let them re-read Use leveled texts carefully to build independence in struggling readers More time on more complex texts Provide scaffolding Get kids inspired and excited about the beauty of language Ensure that complexity of text builds from grade to grade. Allow and encourage teachers to build a unit in a way that has students scaffold to more complex texts over time Allow and encourage teachers the opportunity to share texts with students that may be more complex Allow and encourage teacher to use leveled texts carefully to build independence in struggling readers Shift 3: Staircase of Complexity

64 We will resume in 12 minutes.

65 Shift 1: Balance of Literature and Informational Text I can balance the amount of literature and informational text in my classroom.

66 What is Shift 1? Balance of literature and informational text (K-5) -50% of information text by 4th grade Students read a true balance of informational and literary texts. Elementary school classrooms are, therefore, places where students access the world – science, social studies, the arts and literature – through text. At least 50% of what students read is informational. Anchor Standards R.I 1-10 R.L 1-10

67 Shift 1: Guiding Questions 1. What will this mean we have to change about our practice? 2. What challenges will we face as we make this shift? 3. What are the implications for my classroom/school as we implement Shift 1?

68 Why is Shift 1 so important? 80% of text adults read is informational, 80% of text read in school is literary. National Geographic School Publishing 2003 Informational texts have a variety of formats, most of which are different from literary texts. Reading informational texts requires different reading strategies and apply those strategies differently Informational Texts and literary text are written and read for different purposes.

69 Nonfiction Text Structures Description Compare/Contrast Cause and Effect Chronology/Sequence Procedural Persuasive Question/Answer Problem/Solution

70 Signal Words Point the Way… Text Structure & Signal Words Description/ Hierarchical List Cause & Effect Compare/ Contrast Problem/ Solution Question & Answer Sequence For instance For example Furthermore Such as Also To begin with Most important Also In fact In addition And to illustrate Since Because This led to On account of Due to As a result of For this reason Consequentially Then…so… Therefore thus In like manner Likewise Similar to The difference between As opposed to After all However And yet But Nevertheless On the other hand One reason for the… A solution A problem Where The question is One answer is Recommendations include How When What Next Why Who How many The best estimate It could be that One may conclude Until Before After Finally Lastly First…last… Now…then On (date) At (time) First, second Meanwhile Not long after initially

71

72 the features that identify nonfiction writing; the selective way nonfiction is read according to the readers purpose; the ways organizational features such as indexes, content pages, glossaries and headings help the reader access the text; the specialized language and language structures used to convey information; how visual literacy such as photographs, diagrams, maps and charts combine with written text to convey information;visual literacy how information in captions and labels combines with running text to convey information; strategies for using prior knowledge and experience to engage in inquiry To become effective readers of informational texts, students need to understand:

73 Shift 1: Fiction and Non-Fiction Use the cards at your table to complete the sort! LiteraryInformational

74

75 Shift 1: Putting it into Practice 1. Use the chart paper at your table to generate a list of informational texts types that you can use in your classroom. 2. Include a short description of how you will use it.

76 If we include more informational text in early schooling, we put children in a better position to handle the reading and writing demands of their later schooling. We would like to see a day when children read to learn and learn to read from the earliest days of schools and throughout their school careers. - Nell Duke

77 What the Student Does… What the Teacher Does… What the Principal Does… Build background knowledge and exposure to the world through reading Apply strategies to reading informational text Provide students equal #s of informational and literary texts Ensure coherent instruction about content Teach strategies for informational texts Teach through and with informational texts Scaffold for the difficulties that informational text present to students Ask students, What is connected here? How does this fit together? What details tell you that? Consider and inventory of informational text in your building. Consider purchasing equal amounts of informational and literacy text to students Ensure teacher accountability for building student content knowledge through text Provide opportunities for PD and co-planning for teachers to become more familiar with informational texts Shift 1: Balance of Literature and Informational Text

78 Shift 3: Staircase of Complexity I can use three measures to analyze text complexity.

79 What is Shift 3? Staircase of Complexity In order to prepare students for the complexity of college and career ready texts, each grade level requires a step of growth on the staircase. Students read the central, grade appropriate text around which instruction is centered. Teachers are patient, create more time and space in the curriculum for this close and careful reading, and provide appropriate and necessary scaffolding and supports so that it is possible for students reading below grade level. Anchor Standard R10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

80 Shift 3: Guiding Questions 1. What will this mean we have to change about our practice? 2. What challenges will we face as we make this shift?

81 Specifically, within reading standard #10: Anchor Standard: R.CCR.10Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. Example Grade-level Standard (2 nd grade and 4 th grade): RL.2.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories and poetry, in the grades 2–3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. RI.4.10By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. Source: Kansas State Department of Education Text Complexity 81

82 So… What do the Common Core Standards mean by text complexity? What is a text complexity band? and How do we ensure the texts our students are reading are in the appropriate text complexity band?

83 83 Source: Kansas State Department of Education Overview of Text Complexity Text complexity is defined by: Qualitative 2.Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands often best measured by an attentive human reader. Quantitative 1.Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity often best measured by computer software. Reader and Task 3.Reader and Task considerations – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned often best made by educators employing their professional judgment.

84 Text Complexity Grade Bands Suggested Lexile Range Suggested ATOS Book Level Range** K-1100L – 500L*1.0 – L – 790L2.0 – L – 980L3.0 – L – 1155L4.0 – L – 1305L4.6 – CCR1215L – 1355L4.8 – 12.0 Quantitative Measures Ranges for Text Complexity Grade Bands Common Core State Standards * The K-1 suggested Lexile range was not identified by the Common Core State Standards and was added by Kansas. ** Taken from Accelerated Reader and the Common Core State Standards, available at the following URL:

85 Where do we find texts in the appropriate text complexity band? Choose an excerpt of text from Appendix B: 85 We could…. or… Use available resources to determine the text complexity of other materials on our own. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

86 A Four-step Process: Determining Text Complexity 86 Quantitative Qualitative Reader and Task 4.Recommend placement in the appropriate text complexity band. 3.Reflect upon the reader and task considerations. 2.Analyze the qualitative measures of the text. 1.Determine the quantitative measures of the text. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

87 87 Measures such as: Word length Word frequency Word difficulty Sentence length Text length Text cohesion Step 1: Quantitative Measures Source: Kansas State Department of Education

88 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 88 The Quantitative Measures Ranges for Text Complexity : This document outlines the suggested ranges for each of the text complexity bands using: 1.Lexile Text Measures ---or--- 2.ATOS Book Levels (Accelerated Reader) Source: Kansas State Department of Education

89 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 89 Lets imagine we want to see where a text falls on the quantitative measures leg of the text complexity triangle, using either the Lexile text measures or the ATOS book level (or both). For illustrative purposes, lets choose Lois Lowrys 1989, Number the Stars. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

90 Finding a Lexile Measure for Text: /http://www.lexile.com/findabook / Step 1: Quantitative Measures 90

91 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 91 Number the Stars by: Lowry, LoisLowry, Lois It's 1943 Copenhagen and the Jews of Denmark are being "relocated," so Annemarie Johansen's best friend, L Number the Stars by: Lowry, LoisLowry, Lois It's 1943 Copenhagen and the Jews of Denmark are being "relocated," so Annemarie Johansen's best friend,...

92 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 92 For texts not in the Lexile database, consider using the Lexile Analyzer: Registration is required (free) Allows user to receive an estimated Lexile score Accommodates texts up to 1000 words in length Texts of any length can be evaluated using the Professional Lexile Analyzereducators can upgrade to this tool for free by requesting access Source: Kansas State Department of Education

93 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 93 Additional Resources for Lexile Measures: Overview video What Does the Lexile Measure Mean? Lexile Measures and the Common Core State Standards Source: Kansas State Department of Education

94 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 94 Finding a ATOS Book Level for Text:

95 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 95

96 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 96 For texts not in the AR Bookfinder database, consider using The ATOS Analyzer: No registration is required (however, you must provide an address to receive results) Three methods of analysis are available: 1.ATOS for Books – for submitting complete text of a book 2.ATOS for Books with Estimated Word Count – does not require full text, just three 150-word passages 3.ATOS for Text– works well for short, full-text submissions (short stories, magazine/newspaper articles, etc.) Source: Kansas State Department of Education

97 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 97 Additional Resources for ATOS Book Level Measures: Accelerated Reader Website Accelerated Reader and the Common Core State Standards Source: Kansas State Department of Education

98 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 98 Lexile Text Measure: ATOS Book Level: 670L 4.5 In which of the text complexity bands would this novel fall? Source: Kansas State Department of Education

99 Text Complexity Grade Bands Suggested Lexile Range Suggested ATOS Book Level Range** K-1100L – 500L*1.0 – L – 790L2.0 – L – 980L3.0 – L – 1155L4.0 – L – 1305L4.6 – CCR1215L – 1355L4.8 – 12.0 Quantitative Measures Ranges for Text Complexity Grade Bands Kansas Common Core Standards * The K-1 suggested Lexile range was not identified by the Common Core State Standards and was added by Kansas. ** Taken from Accelerated Reader and the Common Core State Standards, available at the following URL:

100 Step 1: Quantitative Measures 100 Remember, however, that the quantitative measures is only the first of three legs of the text complexity triangle. Our final recommendation may be validated, influenced, or even over-ruled by our examination of qualitative measures and the reader and task considerations. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

101 101 Step 2: Qualitative Measures Measures such as: Levels of meaning Levels of purpose Structure Organization Language conventionality Language clarity Prior knowledge demands Source: Kansas State Department of Education

102 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 102 The Qualitative Measures Rubrics for Literary and Informational Text : The rubric for literary text and the rubric for informational text allow educators to evaluate the important elements of text that are often missed by computer software that tends to focus on more easily measured factors. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

103 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 103 Because the factors for literary texts are different from information texts, these two rubrics contain different content. However, the formatting of each document is exactly the same. And because these factors represent continua rather than discrete stages or levels, numeric values are not associated with these rubrics. Instead, four points along each continuum are identified: high, middle high, middle low, and low. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

104 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 104 So… How is the rubric used? And how would Number the Stars fair when analyzed through the lens of the Literary Text Rubric? Source: Kansas State Department of Education

105 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 105

106 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 106 Lexile Text Measure: ATOS Book Level: 670L 4.5 From examining the quantitative measures, we knew: But after reflecting upon the qualitative measures, we believed: Source: Kansas State Department of Education

107 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 107 Quantitative Qualitative Reader and Task Our initial placement of Number the Stars into a text complexity band changed when we examined the qualitative measures. Remember, however, that we have completed only the first two legs of the text complexity triangle. The reader and task considerations still remain. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

108 108 Step 3: Reader and Task Considerations such as: Motivation Knowledge and experience Purpose for reading Complexity of task assigned regarding text Complexity of questions asked regarding text Source: Kansas State Department of Education

109 Step 3:Reader and Task Considerations 109 Questions for Professional Reflection on Reader and Task Considerations : The questions provided in this resource are meant to spur teacher thought and reflection upon the text, students, and any tasks associated with the text. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

110 Step 3:Reader and Task Considerations 110 The questions included here are largely open-ended questions without single, correct answers, but help educators to think through the implications of using a particular text in the classroom. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

111 Step 4: Recommended Placement 111 Recommended Placement After reflecting upon all three legs of the text complexity model we can make a final recommendation of placement within a text and begin to document our thinking for future reference. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

112 Step 4: Recommended Placement 112 Lexile Text Measure: ATOS Book Level: 670L 4.5 Source: Kansas State Department of Education

113 Step 4: Recommended Placement 113 Based upon all the informationall three legs of the modelthe final recommendation for Number the Stars is…. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

114 Step 4: Recommended Placement 114 Grades 2–3 Text Exemplars Stories Gannett, Ruth Stiles. My Fathers Dragon Averill, Esther. The Fire Cat Steig, William. Amos & Boris Shulevitz, Uri. The Treasure Cameron, Ann. The Stories Julian Tells MacLachlan, Patricia. Sarah, Plain and Tall Rylant, Cynthia. Henry and Mudge: The First Book of Their Adventures Stevens, Janet. Tops and Bottoms LaMarche, Jim. The Raft Rylant, Cynthia. Poppleton in Winter Rylant, Cynthia. The Lighthouse Family: The Storm Osborne, Mary Pope. The One-Eyed Giant (Book One of Tales from the Odyssey) Silverman, Erica. Cowgirl Kate and Cocoa COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects Appendix B: Text Exemplars and Sample Performance Tasks Source: Kansas State Department of Education

115 Step 4: Recommended Placement 115 Template for Text Complexity Analysis and Recommended Placement Form The one-page template provides an opportunity to record the thinking involved in recommending the placement of a specific text into a text complexity band. Keeping a record of such analysis and thinking might be useful documentation in the case that any questions arise in the future. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

116 Step 4: Recommended Placement 116 Source: Kansas State Department of Education

117

118 Shift 3: Putting it into Practice GROUP MATERIALS: Take the book from your folder and use the forms in the text complexity packet to determine a complexity band for that text. Work as a table group and fill out each form. Step 1: Quantitative Measure (Lexile or ATOS) is found on the sticky note inside the cover. Source: Kansas State Department of Education

119 Long Range Goal: 1. What is one complex text, possibly chosen from Appendix B of the Common Core around which we can build a unit this semester?Appendix B of the Common Core 2. What will we do less of in order to make room for the time it will take to read this text closely? 3. Which portions of the text should we focus on? 4. Which portions should we ask students to re-read multiple times? 5. What role can independent reading play in this unit for students who struggle to access the central text on their own? 6. What other supports will we need to provide for these students? 7. When was the last time I was challenged by a text? 8. What did I do to handle/ manage/ work within that frustration?

120 What the Student Does… What the Teacher Does… What the Principal Does… Read to see what more they can find and learn as they re-read texts again and again Read material at own level to build joy of reading and pleasure in the world Be persistent despite challenges when reading; good readers tolerate frustration Ensure students are engaged in more complex texts at every grade level Engage students in rigorous conversation Provide experience with complex texts Give students less to read, let them re-read Use leveled texts carefully to build independence in struggling readers More time on more complex texts Provide scaffolding Get kids inspired and excited about the beauty of language Ensure that complexity of text builds from grade to grade. Allow and encourage teachers to build a unit in a way that has students scaffold to more complex texts over time Allow and encourage teachers the opportunity to share texts with students that may be more complex Allow and encourage teacher to use leveled texts carefully to build independence in struggling readers Shift 3: Staircase of Complexity

121 Wrapping it up: Look in your GROUP MATERIAL folder: 1. Take a look at the sample curriculum maps. Go through each one with your group and select features that you feel are beneficial. 2. With your group, record these features on sticky notes and place them back inside the Ziplock bag inside of the folder. 3. If you are interested in serving on a committee to look at curriculum mapping, please record your name on the chart paper by the door labeled Yes, Im Interested.

122 If you have any questions, please contact us. Mia Johnson Lora Drum Kathy Keane Kristi Alfaro Kim Ramsey


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