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Session 3 – Comprehension and Practicum NGCARPD- Cohort 2 January 11, 2012 1 Welcome back. Please sign in. Turn in your vocabulary quiz.

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Presentation on theme: "Session 3 – Comprehension and Practicum NGCARPD- Cohort 2 January 11, 2012 1 Welcome back. Please sign in. Turn in your vocabulary quiz."— Presentation transcript:

1 Session 3 – Comprehension and Practicum NGCARPD- Cohort 2 January 11, Welcome back. Please sign in. Turn in your vocabulary quiz.

2 Todays Agenda This morning: -SSS and Common Core Correlation -Text Complexity This afternoon: -Review of CIS Model -Discussion/Sharing of Your Lessons -Overview and Requirements of Practicum 2

3 TODAYS FOCUS: INFORMATIONAL TEXT Correlation Between Sunshine State Standards and Common Core Standards

4 Comparing FCAT 2.0 and Common Core Highlight references to informational text throughout the Sunshine State Standards for Reading. Highlight references to informational text throughout the CCSS for English Language Arts/Science standards. Note the cluster areas for Reading Standards for Informational Text: Key Ideas and Details Craft and Structure Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

5 Comparing FCAT 2.0 and Common Core Use chart paper (top half – SSS; bottom half – Common Core) and marker to create a graphic that represents the informational standards for your assigned grade level. (See sample) Discuss differences. Identify a speaker to share your findings. Post your chart paper on the wall in the appropriate sequence. Share findings. (3 minutes each).

6 TEXT COMPLEXITY Module 3: Comprehension

7 Text Complexity Key to Student Reading Success Text complexity matters because…. making textbooks easier ultimately denies students the very language, information, and modes of thought they need most to move up and on. -Marilyn Jager Adams 7

8 Text Complexity - ACT Study Purpose: Determine what distinguished the reading performance of students likely to succeed in college and not. Process: Set benchmark score on the reading test shown to be predictive of success in college (21 on ACT composite score). Looked at results from a half million students. Divided texts into three levels of complexity: uncomplicated, more challenging, and complex. 8

9 Performance on the ACT Reading Test by Comprehension Level (Averaged across Seven Forms) 9

10 Performance on the ACT Reading Test by Textual Element ( Averaged across Seven Forms) 10

11 Text Complexity Matters Performance on complex texts is the clearest differentiator in reading between students who are more likely to be ready for college and those who are less likely to be ready. Texts used in the ACT Reading Test reflect three degrees of complexity: uncomplicated, more challenging, and complex. 11

12 12 Performance on the ACT Reading Test by Degree of Text Complexity (Averaged across Seven Forms) In this figure, performance on questions associated with uncomplicated and more challenging texts both above and below the ACT College Readiness Benchmark for Reading follows a pattern similar to those in the previous analyses. Improvement on each of the two kinds of questions is gradual and fairly uniform. 12

13 Recap of ACT Findings Question type and level (main idea, word meanings, details) is NOT the chief differentiator between student scoring above and below the benchmark. The degree of text complexity in the passages acted as the sorters within ACT. The findings held true for both males and females, all racial groups and was steady regardless of family income level. What students could read, in terms of its complexity--rather than what they could do with what they readis greatest predictor of success. FCAT has complex passages and highly cognitive demanding questions. 13

14 Text Requirements in Middle and High School Many students are engaged in shallow reading, skimming text for answers, focusing only on details and failing to make inferences in order to integrate different parts of the text. Years of reading in this superficial way will cause a students reading ability to deteriorate. For many students the decline of text demands in the courses that they take has both an immediate and long term impact on student achievement.

15 Guiding Questions What do the Common Core Learning Standards mean by text complexity? What is a text complexity band? and How do we ensure the texts our students are reading are in the appropriate text complexity band? 15

16 Overview o Text Complexity Text complexity is defined by: Qualitative Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands often best measured by an attentive human reader. Quantitative Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity often best measured by computer software. Reader and Task Reader and Task considerations – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned often best made by educators employing their professional judgment. 16

17 Determining Text Complexity A Four-step Process: Quantitative Qualitative Reader and Task 4.Recommend placement in the appropriate text complexity band. 3.Reflect upon the reader and task considerations. 2.Analyze the qualitative measures of the text. 1.Determine the quantitative measures of the text. 17

18 Step 1: Quantitative Measures Measures such as: Word length Word frequency Word difficulty Sentence length Text length Text cohesion Quantitative Measures 18

19 Quantitative Measures Ranges for Text Complexity Grade Bands Common Core State Standards

20 Text Complexity Grade Bands Suggested Lexile Range Suggested ATOS Book Level Range** K L – 790L2.0 – L – 980L3.0 – L – 1155L4.0 – L – 1305L4.6 – CCR1215L – 1355L4.8 – 12.0 Quantitative Measures Ranges for Text Complexity Grade Bands Common Core State Standards

21 Quantitative Measures The Quantitative Measures Ranges for Text Complexity : This document outlines the suggested ranges for each of the text complexity bands using Lexile Measures. 21

22 Quantitative Measures Lets imagine we want to see where a text falls on the quantitative measures leg of the text complexity triangle, using the Lexile text measure. For illustrative purposes, lets use, Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell. Take a few minutes to read the story and estimate the appropriate grade level for instructional purposes. 22

23 Quantitative Measures Lexile Text Measure: Flesch-Kincaid in Word: Grade Level In which of the text complexity bands would this text fall? 23

24 Quantitative Measures 24 Read and discuss the article entitled Lexile-to-Grade Correspondence. As you read, consider the following questions: What is the purpose of Lexile Measures? For what purposes should teachers NOT use Lexile Measures? What is IQR? What function does it serve? What is a stretch text? What other considerations exist for text selection in a classroom? Based on the information provided in the article, what is the best placement for Shooting an Elephant?

25 Text Complexity Grade Bands Suggested Lexile Range Suggested ATOS Book Level Range** K-1100L – 500L*1.0 – L – 790L2.0 – L – 980L3.0 – L – 1155L4.0 – L – 1305L4.6 – CCR1215L – 1355L4.8 – 12.0 Quantitative Measures Ranges for Text Complexity Grade Bands Common Core Learning Standards * The K-1 suggested Lexile range was not identified by the Common Core State Standards and was added by Kansas. ** Taken from Accelerated Reader and the Common Core State Standards, available at the following URL:

26 Quantitative Measures Remember, however, that the quantitative measures is only the first of three legs of the text complexity triangle. Our final recommendation may be validated, influenced, or even over-ruled by our examination of qualitative measures and the reader and task considerations. 26

27 Quantitative Measures Additional Resources Lexile Measures and the Common Core State Standards Accelerated reader and the Common Core State Standards Coh-Metrix Coh-Metrix calculates the coherence of texts on a wide range of measures. It replaces common readability formulas by applying the latest in computational linguistics and linking this to the latest research in psycholinguistics. 27

28 Step 2: Qualitative Measures Measures such as: Structure Language Demands and Conventions Knowledge Demands Levels of Meaning/Purpose 28

29 Common Core Standards Qualitative Features of Text Complexity Structure (could be story structure and/or form of piece) Simple Complex Explicit Implicit Conventional Unconventional Events related in chronological order Events related out of chronological order (chiefly literary texts) Traits of a common genre or subgenre Traits specific to a particular discipline (chiefly informational texts) Simple graphics sophisticated graphics Graphics unnecessary or merely supplemental to understanding the text Graphics essential to understanding the text and may provide information not elsewhere provided 29

30 Qualitative Features of Text Complexity: Text Structure At your tables, complete the structure chart. Be prepared to share with the rest of the group. 30

31 Qualitative Features of Text Complexity: Language Demands Language Demands: Conventionality and Clarity Literal Figurative or ironic Clear Ambiguous or purposefully misleading Contemporary, familiar Archaic or otherwise unfamiliar Conversational General Academic and domain specific Light vocabulary load: few unfamiliar or academic words Many words unfamiliar and high academic vocabulary present Sentence structure straightforward Complex and varied sentence structures Though vocabulary can be measured by quantifiable means, it is still a feature for careful consideration when selecting texts Though sentence length is measured by quantifiable means, sentence complexity is still a feature for careful consideration when selecting texts 31

32 Qualitative Features of Text Complexity: Language Demands At your tables, complete the language demands chart. Be prepared to share with the rest of the group. 32

33 Qualitative Features of Text Complexity: Knowledge Demands Knowledge Demands: Life Experience (literary texts) Simple theme Complex or sophisticated themes Single theme Multiple themes Common everyday experiences or clearly fantastical situations Experiences distinctly different from ones own Single perspective Multiple perspectives Perspective(s) like ones own Perspective(s) unlike or in opposition to ones own 33

34 Common Core Standards Qualitative Features of Text Complexity Knowledge Demands: Cultural/Literary Knowledge (chiefly literary texts) Everyday knowledge and familiarity with genre conventions required Cultural and literary knowledge useful Low intertextuality (few if any references/allusions to other texts) High intertextuality (many references/allusions to other texts 34

35 Qualitative Features of Text Complexity: Knowledge Demands At your tables, complete the knowledge demands chart. Be prepared to share with the rest of the group. 35

36 Common Core Standards Qualitative Features of Text Complexity Levels of Meaning (chiefly literary texts) or purpose (chiefly informational texts) Single level of meaning Multiple levels of meaning Explicitly stated purpose Implicit purpose, may be hidden or obscure 36

37 Qualitative Features of Text Complexity: Levels of Meaning/Purpose At your tables, complete the levels of meaning/purpose chart. As a group, discuss the three questions at the bottom of the levels of meaning/purpose handout. Be prepared to share. 37

38 Text Complexity: Qualitative Measures The Qualitative Measures Rubrics for Literary and Informational Text : The rubric for literary text and the rubric for informational text allow educators to evaluate the important elements of text that are often missed by computer software that tends to focus on more easily measured factors. 38

39 Text Complexity: Qualitative Measures Because the factors for literary texts are different from informational texts, these two rubrics contain different content. However, the formatting of each document is exactly the same. And because these factors represent continua rather than discrete stages or levels, numeric values are not associated with these rubric. Instead, six points along each continuum is identified: not suited to the band, early-mid grade level, mid-end grade level, early-mid grade level, mid-end grade level, not suited to band. 39

40 Text Complexity: Qualitative Measures How is the rubric used? And how would Shooting an Elephant fair when analyzed through the lens of the Text Rubric? 40

41 Step 3: Reader and Task Considerations such as: Motivation Knowledge and experience Purpose for reading Complexity of task assigned regarding text Complexity of questions asked regarding text 41

42 Evaluate complexity of Shooting an Elephant. Based on the quantitative features (Lexile), qualitative analysis, and reader/task considerations, at what grade level would you teach this text? Discuss at your table and be prepared to share. 42

43 Determining Text Complexity A Four-step Process: Quantitative Qualitative Reader and Task 4.Recommend placement in the appropriate text complexity band. 3.Reflect upon the reader and task considerations. 2.Analyze the qualitative measures of the text. 1.Determine the quantitative measures of the text. 43

44 Where do we find texts in the appropriate text complexity band? Choose an excerpt of text from Appendix B as a starting place: We could…. or… Use available resources to determine the text complexity of other materials on our own. 44

45 COMMON CORE CURRICULUM MAPS ORG/FREE/ Common Core Lesson Plans by Grade

46 Activity: Text Complexity 1.Review the texts for your particular grade and subject. See CCSS Appendix Table of Contents. 2.Discuss with your colleagues the appropriateness of documents in the Appendix for your standards and students. Also discuss the question: How can we ensure that the documents we use in our classes are appropriately complex? 3.Be prepared to share with the group. 46

47 Lunch Time 47

48 1. TEACHER PRESENTS A HOOK QUESTION FOR DISCUSSION. 2. STUDENTS CONDUCT PREDICTIVE WRITING IN RESPONSE TO AN ESSENTIAL QUESTION. 3. THE TEACHER INTRODUCES VOCABULARY – WORD PARTS, CONTEXT, ACADEMIC WORDS, GENERAL VOCABULARY 4. THE TEACHER READS TEXT ALOUD/STUDENTS MARK TEXT USING CODES. 5. STUDENTS DISCUSS TEXT MARKING AND WRITE IN RESPONSE TO QUESTION. 6. STUDENTS READ TEXT A SECOND TIME AND TAKE NOTES ON GRAPHIC ORGANIZER. 7. STUDENTS MAY WRITE IN RESPONSE TO NOTE-TAKING. 8. STUDENTS READ TEXT A THIRD TIME. THE TEACHER MODELS QUESTION GENERATION. STUDENTS GENERATE QUESTIONS ON TEXT. 9. STUDENTS WRITE IN RESPONSE TO ESSENTIAL QUESTION. 10. STUDENT REVISE WRITTEN RESPONSE AFTER THE TEACHER SHARES THE RUBRIC. Review of the CIS Model

49 Table Talk: Making the CIS Model Work for You Review the CIS model and discuss modifications you would make to facilitate its use in your classroom. Remember to protect the research-based strategies which are needed to get results with your students.

50 Developing the CIS Model for your Classroom At your table, share the CIS lesson you developed. Select one CIS model to be shared with the entire group.

51 NGCARPD Practicum Requirements Narrative detailing the growth of two students over a nine-week period Reflection log for four meetings Submission of two CIS lessons with supporting documents, i.e. student work samples, rubrics, lesson texts, etc. (Although you are required to complete three, you will only submit two of them.) Video of CIS lesson submitted to Secondary Reading office.

52 Practicum Requirement Issues We meet February 1, February 15, and March 7. You need to develop, implement, and document one CIS lesson to bring to one of our meetings. Do you want it to be February 1 or February 15? April 1 is the deadline for completion of all requirements.


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