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Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 61 Civics.

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Presentation on theme: "Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 61 Civics."— Presentation transcript:

1 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 61 Civics

2 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics2 Motivation What do you think your responsibilities as U.S. citizens are and what your government’s responsibilities to its citizens are? This lesson deals with these questions.

3 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics3 What is civics? Civics—the study of the rights and duties of citizens Citizens—owe loyalty to their government and receive its protection Citizens follow a set of rules and accept the government's authority.

4 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics4 Why is government needed? Government—the ruling authority for a community Government helps people live together peacefully and productively.

5 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics5 What are the functions of government? Keeping order Providing security Providing public services Guiding the community by developing public policy

6 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics6 What are the levels of government? National government in Washington, D.C. State governments in each of the 50 states Local governments for counties, cities, and towns No lower level can go against the laws and authority of the national government.

7 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics7 What are the types of governments? Dictatorship—control by one person or a small group of people (Cuba) Democracy—rule by the people (United States) Direct democracy—all the citizens vote firsthand (ancient Athens)

8 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics8 What are the types of governments? (cont’d) Representative democracy—citizens choose a smaller group to govern but are the source of the government's authority (United States) U.S. citizens elect presidents and members of Congress but express their opinions by contacting their representatives.

9 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics9 What are the principles of American democracy? The power of government comes from the citizens. Americans run the government through elected representatives. The government’s purpose is to improve life in the United States. Elections are free, fair, and competitive.

10 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics10 What are the principles of American democracy? (cont’d) Competing political parties are an important part of democracies. Individuals are free to develop their own capacities. Majority rule—abiding by what most people want while respecting minority rights

11 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics11 Who are America's citizens? 3 ways to become a citizen are: Birth, Naturalization, Act of Congress. Citizens are those born in the United States or to parents who are citizens. Foreigners become citizens through naturalization. Aliens come to the U.S. for a short time and return home without becoming citizens. Immigrants move permanently to a new country and can apply for citizenship.

12 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics12 Who are America's citizens? (cont’d) Birth – Right of Soil and/or Right of Blood Right of Soil – a citizen based on where you are born Right of Blood – based on the nationality of one or both parents. Naturalization – A process whereby foreigners become citizens. Must pass a basic history of the United States test within 3 years or are deported. Act of Congress – Citizenship granted automatically when territories are annexed by the United States.

13 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics13 Who are America's citizens? (cont’d) Only the federal government can grant citizenship and take it away. State governments can deny some privileges of citizenship, such as voting, but cannot deny citizenship itself. In most cases, the only way to lose U.S. citizenship is to voluntarily give it up. Once given up, it cannot be gotten back.

14 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics14 Who are the aliens in America? About 675,000 immigrants enter the United States each year. Priority is given to people with Particular skills Particular talents Money to invest in the U.S. economy Relatives who are US citizens

15 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics15 Who are the aliens in America? (cont’d) The 5 to 6 million illegal aliens in the United States come for work and a better life but often have a difficult time. Low-paying jobs Fear of being deported

16 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics16 Who are the aliens in America? (cont’d) Aliens can lead lives much like U.S. citizens. They can hold jobs and own property. But they may not Vote in elections Run for office Serve on juries Work in most government jobs They must carry identification cards at all times.

17 Check review info from citizenship

18 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics18 What are a citizen's legal duties according to JFK? Obey laws Be loyal citizens Defend the nation Vote if eligible

19 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics19 What are a citizen's civic responsibilities? Being informed about what the government is doing Voting in elections Respecting the rights of other people Respecting public property and the property of others

20 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics20 What are a citizen's civic responsibilities? (cont’d) Respecting the practices and traditions of others Contributing to the common good

21 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics21 Why do citizens need to be involved? Volunteers make communities better places to live. The value of time volunteered by Americans has been increasing since In 1998, it was about $225 billion.

22 Foundations of United States Citizenship Lesson 2, Chapter 6, Civics22 Why do citizens need to be involved? (cont’d)


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