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LGBT History Month takes place every February to celebrate the lives and achievements of the LGBT community. We are committed to celebrate its diversity.

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Presentation on theme: "LGBT History Month takes place every February to celebrate the lives and achievements of the LGBT community. We are committed to celebrate its diversity."— Presentation transcript:

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2 LGBT History Month takes place every February to celebrate the lives and achievements of the LGBT community. We are committed to celebrate its diversity and that of the society as a whole. We encourage everyone to see diversity and cultural pluralism as the positive forces that they are and endeavour to reflect this in all we do This reflects the college ethos and policies of inclusion of everyone regardless of sexual orientation. This year we are celebrating many different groups beginning with the LGBT community. Currently here in the UK the LGBT community have the same legal rights as anyone else. Couples are able to celebrate their love with a civil partnership and soon they will have the rights to be married.

3 Is there a legal difference between the two? The Civil Partnership Act 2004 gave same-sex couples the rights and responsibilities similar to those in a civil marriage. Civil partners are entitled to the same property rights, the same exemptions on inheritance tax, social security and pension benefits as married couples. They also have the same ability to get parental responsibility for a partner's children as well as reasonable maintenance, tenancy rights, insurance and next-of-kin rights in hospital and with doctors. There is a process similar to divorce for dissolving a civil partnership.marriage Until now it has been banned for civil partnership ceremonies to include religious readings, music or symbols and forbidden for them to take place in religious venues, regardless of the views of the building's owners. In Scotland, which has its own legislation, some church parishes offer blessing ceremonies for same-sex couples. These rights are found throughout the world. However in some countries in the world being gay could cost you your freedom or your live.

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5 'Nobody thinks I'd dare show my face here' – inside a Nigerian sharia court New legislation has increased homophobia – and in the state of Bauchi, led to a court being mobbed by anti-gay protesters. A crowd gathers outside a sharia court in the northern Nigerian city of Bauchi during the trial of seven men accused of being gay. The man who threw the first stone was a taxi driver, his skinny shoulders poking through a faded red football shirt. He hurled a rock with such force it splintered as it crashed into the side of the sharia court. The next one sailed in through an open window, hitting a spectator on the head. "God will punish homosexuals!" the taxi driver screamed as the crowd joined him in pelting the building. Inside Upper Sharia Court 4, officials sprang into action, unsurprised by the violent turn in the trial of seven men accused of being homosexual in the ultraconservative Nigerian state of Bauchi. Judge El-Yakubu Aliyu's white scarf, a symbol of wisdom, was trampled in the dusty ground as he was bundled into a back office for his safety. Among the viewers trapped in the court was John, a gay rights activist, who wondered if he had made a terrible mistake in attending the trial. On the run since a sweeping anti-gay bill was passed this month, John had ignored the advice of everyone he knew by sneaking into his home state at dawn. "Nobody thinks I'd dare show my face here, so I have the element of surprise," he had said earlier, directing a rickshaw along labyrinthine back routes to avoid detection. gay rightsa sweeping anti-gay bill was passedgay rightsa sweeping anti-gay bill was passed

6 Olympic rules for protesting against Russia's anti-gay laws clarified Activists holding placards depicting the Russian president, Vladimir Putin, protest against Russia's new anti-gay laws in London. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has made it clear to nations competing in February's Winter Games in Sochi that athletes will be free to speak out against Russia's controversial anti-gay laws, as long as they do so away from accredited areas.The British Olympic Association (BOA) said it had received a letter from the IOC clarifying its rule 50, which says "no kind of demonstration or political, religious or racial propaganda is permitted". The IOC has been under pressure to clarify its position since Russia introduced the new laws, which prohibit the "promotion" of homosexuality to under 18s, earlier this year.International Olympic CommitteeRussiaBritish Olympic Association This prompted calls for a boycott of the Games from some, including the actor Stephen Fry, and led others to condemn the new laws. The BOA, which expects to send up to 55 athletes to the Winter Olympics, said it had received a letter from the IOC this week, after last week's executive committee meeting, clarifying the rules.Winter Olympics The IOC has also said that Sochi organisers will provide "protest zones", as in Beijing, where demonstrations would be permitted. Human rights groups are concerned not only about the anti-gay laws but a wider chilling effect on freedom of speech under Vladimir Putin. The BOA said it would not stand in the way of any athletes who wanted to speak out on gay rights or any other issue, as long as they comply with the Olympic charter.gay rights

7 Will Young discusses homophobia Manchester pride


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