Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The Great Samuel Coleridge!! By: Chelsea Anderson Kyle Endt Ashton Yates.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The Great Samuel Coleridge!! By: Chelsea Anderson Kyle Endt Ashton Yates."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Great Samuel Coleridge!! By: Chelsea Anderson Kyle Endt Ashton Yates

2 Background! Born on Ottery St. Mary Devonshire ( ) Born on Ottery St. Mary Devonshire ( ) His middle name was Taylor His middle name was Taylor Samual was the youngest of 10 kids Samual was the youngest of 10 kids Parents were Reverend John Coleridge, and Ann Bowdon Parents were Reverend John Coleridge, and Ann Bowdon Later in life Samual married Sara Fricker in (he did not love her) Later in life Samual married Sara Fricker in (he did not love her)

3 Random Facts Samual went to Jesus College Samual went to Jesus College He joined the Reformist Movement in 1793 He joined the Reformist Movement in 1793 Samual joined the army, but once he found out he wasn’t fit for it he was labeled with “insanity” by his brother Captain James Coleridge Samual joined the army, but once he found out he wasn’t fit for it he was labeled with “insanity” by his brother Captain James Coleridge He suffered from Neuralgic and rheumatic pains thus he was addicted to Opium He suffered from Neuralgic and rheumatic pains thus he was addicted to Opium Samual believed imagination to be the vital force behind poetry. Samual believed imagination to be the vital force behind poetry. Samual’s earliest writing were charms, spells, and chants to warn of sickness. Samual’s earliest writing were charms, spells, and chants to warn of sickness.

4 Random Facts 2 Samuel Coleridge wrote: Samuel Coleridge wrote: – Poems On Various Subjects – 1796 – Poems, The Watchman Coleridge became friends with Dorothy and William Wordsworth. Coleridge became friends with Dorothy and William Wordsworth. This results in Lyrical Ballads- opened with 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner' (Coleridge), and ended with 'Tintern Abbey‘ (Wordsworth). This results in Lyrical Ballads- opened with 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner' (Coleridge), and ended with 'Tintern Abbey‘ (Wordsworth). – These poems set a new style by using everyday language and fresh ways of looking at nature.

5 Kubla Khan History Written in1798 Written in1798 Samual claimed to have heard these words in an opium induced dream. Samual claimed to have heard these words in an opium induced dream. – “In Xanadu did Kubla Khan” Originally titled “ A Vision in a Dream. A Fragment” Originally titled “ A Vision in a Dream. A Fragment” Samual wrote about two hundred to three hundred lines of poetry simultaneously while he slept. Samual wrote about two hundred to three hundred lines of poetry simultaneously while he slept.

6 Kubla Khan History 2 The poem is really about nothing, it doesn’t have a meaning. The poem is really about nothing, it doesn’t have a meaning. Since this poem is about nothing; Samuel uses enthralling language and feeling to intrigue the reader. Since this poem is about nothing; Samuel uses enthralling language and feeling to intrigue the reader. The language used in the poem is very descriptive you can imagine what Coleridge envisioned. The language used in the poem is very descriptive you can imagine what Coleridge envisioned. Kubla Khan is a lyrical poem that is in four stanzas. Kubla Khan is a lyrical poem that is in four stanzas. Kubla Khan is written in iambic pentameter Kubla Khan is written in iambic pentameter

7 Kubla Khan – Stanza 1 In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree: Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. So twice five miles of fertile ground With walls and towers were girdled round: And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills, Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree; And here were forests ancient as the hills, Enfolding sunny spots of greenery. In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree: Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. So twice five miles of fertile ground With walls and towers were girdled round: And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills, Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree; And here were forests ancient as the hills, Enfolding sunny spots of greenery.

8 Meaning – Stanza 1 Xanadu – a town/city Xanadu – a town/city Alph – sacred river Alph – sacred river Kubla Khan – came from the Chinese emperor of Kublai Khan Kubla Khan – came from the Chinese emperor of Kublai Khan Coleridge is describing a place; a carefree utopia Coleridge is describing a place; a carefree utopia

9 Kubla Khan - Stanza 2 But oh! that deep romantic chasm which slanted Down the green hill athwart a cedarn cover! A savage place! as holy and enchanted As e'er beneath a waning moon was haunted By woman wailing for her demon-lover! And from this chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething, As if this earth in fast thick pants were breathing, A mighty fountain momently was forced: Amid whose swift half-intermitted burst Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail, Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher's flail: And 'mid these dancing rocks at once and ever It flung up momently the sacred river. Five miles meandering with a mazy motion Through wood and dale the sacred river ran, Then reached the caverns measureless to man, And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean: And 'mid this tumult Kubla heard from far Ancestral voices prophesying war! But oh! that deep romantic chasm which slanted Down the green hill athwart a cedarn cover! A savage place! as holy and enchanted As e'er beneath a waning moon was haunted By woman wailing for her demon-lover! And from this chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething, As if this earth in fast thick pants were breathing, A mighty fountain momently was forced: Amid whose swift half-intermitted burst Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail, Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher's flail: And 'mid these dancing rocks at once and ever It flung up momently the sacred river. Five miles meandering with a mazy motion Through wood and dale the sacred river ran, Then reached the caverns measureless to man, And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean: And 'mid this tumult Kubla heard from far Ancestral voices prophesying war!

10 Meaning – Stanza 2 Savage – not domesticated or cultivated; wild Savage – not domesticated or cultivated; wild Describes a savage place Coleridge envisions. Describes a savage place Coleridge envisions. A holy, enchanted place that has a forced fountain because of an earthquake A holy, enchanted place that has a forced fountain because of an earthquake This stanza is about the circumstances and setting surrounding his (Samuel’s) “pleasure – dome”. This stanza is about the circumstances and setting surrounding his (Samuel’s) “pleasure – dome”.

11 Kubla Khan- Stanza 3 The shadow of the dome of pleasure Floated midway on the waves; Where was heard the mingled measure From the fountain and the caves. It was a miracle of rare device, A sunny pleasure-dome with caves of ice! The shadow of the dome of pleasure Floated midway on the waves; Where was heard the mingled measure From the fountain and the caves. It was a miracle of rare device, A sunny pleasure-dome with caves of ice!

12 Meaning – Stanza 3 “pleasure-dome” is built by Kubla and is described to be sunny. “pleasure-dome” is built by Kubla and is described to be sunny. In the first stanza the underground sea was described as being “sunless”, but the waves are discussed to bear the shadow of the “pleasure- dome” In the first stanza the underground sea was described as being “sunless”, but the waves are discussed to bear the shadow of the “pleasure- dome” This means the “pleasure-dome” has miracle qualities because it is lit up next to a sunless sea. This means the “pleasure-dome” has miracle qualities because it is lit up next to a sunless sea. The final line in this stanza is an exclamation, and it is the climax of the poem. The final line in this stanza is an exclamation, and it is the climax of the poem.

13 Kubla Khan – Stanza 4 A damsel with a dulcimer In a vision once I saw: It was an Abyssinian maid, And on her dulcimer she played, Singing of Mount Abora. Could I revive within me Her symphony and song, To such a deep delight 'twould win me That with music loud and long I would build that dome in air, That sunny dome! those caves of ice! A damsel with a dulcimer In a vision once I saw: It was an Abyssinian maid, And on her dulcimer she played, Singing of Mount Abora. Could I revive within me Her symphony and song, To such a deep delight 'twould win me That with music loud and long I would build that dome in air, That sunny dome! those caves of ice!

14 Meaning – Stanza 4 The damsel is used as a metaphor. The damsel is used as a metaphor. – Damsel = Coleridge Coleridge wishes that he was inspired in the way Kubla Khan was. Coleridge wishes that he was inspired in the way Kubla Khan was. Coleridge is speaking to us and telling us this was his own personal vision, not Kubla Khan’s. Coleridge is speaking to us and telling us this was his own personal vision, not Kubla Khan’s. Coleridge wants to build this “pleasure-dome” and wants to be in the utopia he describes. Coleridge wants to build this “pleasure-dome” and wants to be in the utopia he describes.

15 Kubla Khan – Stanza 5 And all who heard should see them there, And all should cry, Beware! Beware! His flashing eyes, his floating hair! Weave a circle round him thrice, And close your eyes with holy dread, For he on honey-dew hath fed And drunk the milk of Paradise. And all who heard should see them there, And all should cry, Beware! Beware! His flashing eyes, his floating hair! Weave a circle round him thrice, And close your eyes with holy dread, For he on honey-dew hath fed And drunk the milk of Paradise.

16 Meaning – Stanza 5 Coleridge fears the structure would not be accepted by most people. Coleridge fears the structure would not be accepted by most people. Coleridge also fears that he will be labeled a mad man, someone who is unreasonable and to be feared. Coleridge also fears that he will be labeled a mad man, someone who is unreasonable and to be feared.

17 Overall Meaning This poem can mean several things or have several different messages to different people. This poem can mean several things or have several different messages to different people. This poem simply describes a beautiful place that Samuel Taylor Coleridge dreamt of when he was high off opium. This poem simply describes a beautiful place that Samuel Taylor Coleridge dreamt of when he was high off opium.

18 Websites That Helped Make This Project AMAZING!!!!!! literature.com/coleridge/640/ literature.com/coleridge/640/ criticism/kubla-khan-samuel-taylor-coleridge criticism/kubla-khan-samuel-taylor-coleridge section5.rhtml section5.rhtml analysis-kubla-khan-by-samuel-taylor-coleridge analysis-kubla-khan-by-samuel-taylor-coleridge


Download ppt "The Great Samuel Coleridge!! By: Chelsea Anderson Kyle Endt Ashton Yates."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google