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Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 1 Module 4: Time-Out.

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Presentation on theme: "Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 1 Module 4: Time-Out."— Presentation transcript:

1 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 1 Module 4: Time-Out

2 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 2 Module 4: Agenda Legal requirements Continuum of time-out arrangements How to use time-out –Planning –Implementation –Monitoring Problem-solving

3 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 3 Legal Requirements Definition of Time-Out Time-out is a behavior management technique in which, to provide a student with an opportunity to regain self-control, the student is separated from other students for a limited period in a setting: –that is not locked; and –from which the student is not physically prevented from leaving TAC (b)(3)

4 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 4 Legal Requirements Use of Time-Out Shall NOT use physical force or threat Use in conjunction with array of positive behavior intervention strategies Include in IEP/BIP if utilized on recurrent basis Shall NOT be implemented in fashion that precludes involvement and progress in general curriculum and IEP TAC (g) –TAC (g)

5 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 5 Legal Requirements Training on Use of Time-Out Who? By 4/1/03—General or special education personnel who implement time-out based on IEP After 4/1/03—Newly identified personnel What? Full continuum of positive behavioral intervention strategies Impact of time-out on involvement and progress in general curriculum and IEP –TAC (h)

6 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 6 Time-Out Continuum: Key Considerations Time-out options fall on a continuum of restrictiveness Use less restrictive forms before resorting to more restrictive options

7 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 7 Time-Out Continuum Less RestrictiveMore Restrictive Planned Ignoring Time-Out RoomTime-Out Screen Head Down Time-Out Card Time-Out Chair/Rug Remove Materials

8 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 8 Legal Requirements Seclusion A school district employee or volunteer or an independent contractor of a district may not place a student in seclusion. TEC SECLUSION

9 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 9 Legal Requirements Seclusion Seclusion means a behavior management technique in which a student is confined in a locked box, locked closet, or locked room that: –is designed solely to seclude a person; and –contains less than 50 square feet of space TEC

10 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 10 How to Use Time-Out Step 1: Targeting Behavior Generate list of inappropriate behaviors Operationalize behaviors Prioritize behaviors

11 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 11 Operational Definition Non-Example Aggression Disruptive behavior Mean Example Hits other students Screams, climbs on furniture Tells other students they are “stupid”

12 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 12 How to Use Time-Out Step 2: Decision-Making Will time-out be used as a consequence for one or more of the target behaviors? If so, for which behaviors? What form of time-out will be used? How long will time-out be?

13 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 13 How to Use Time-Out Step 2: Decision-Making (cont.) Who will teach the student the time-out procedure? What will happen if the student refuses to go to time-out? How will the student be released from time-out? How will the effects of time-out be monitored?

14 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 14 How to Use Time-Out Step 3: Implementation the time-out procedure!

15 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 15 How to Use Time-Out Step 3: Implementation (cont.) When the target misbehavior occurs: Simply say, “That is (name the misbehavior). Time-out” Implement the designated procedure Allow a reasonable wait time for the student to go to time-out Ignore mildly inappropriate behavior as the student goes to time-out or takes time- out

16 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 16 How to Use Time-Out Step 3: Implementation (cont.) DO NOT: Give further explanation Become involved in an argument with the student Cajole or threaten the student Escalate the situation Interact with the student during time-out

17 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 17 How to Use Time-Out Step 3: Implementation (cont.) Remember: Use the time-out procedure every time! Require student to complete the request or task after time-out, or any work missed during time- out.

18 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 18 Legal Requirements Documentation of Time-Out Addressed in IEP and/or BIP Considered by ARD Committee to judge effectiveness of intervention and provide basis for continued use TAC (i)

19 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 19 How to Use Time-Out Step 4: Evaluation Data Collection: Effects on target behavior Use of time-out procedure

20 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 20 Evaluation of the Effects of Time-out Time-out is a behavior reductive technique. If the target behavior does not decrease: –Address implementation, or –Implement alternative procedure High-frequency behaviors will get quick results Low-frequency behaviors will take longer for time-out to work

21 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 21 Frequency Monitoring Determine when you will measure the behavior. –When is the behavior is most likely to occur? –Monitor for the same length of time each day. Record a tally mark each time the target behavior occurs. Display raw data on a line graph or bar graph.

22 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 22 Activity: Evaluating Time-Out

23 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 23 Evaluation of the Use of Time-out Documentation elements: Date Student’s name Target behavior that resulted in time-out Type of time-out used When time-out occurred Who gave time-out Time of onset of time-out When time-out ended Student’s behavior during time-out Whether student required additional minutes of time- out Student’s behavior following time-out

24 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 24 Problem-Solving When Time-Out is Not Working If data indicate little or no change in target behavior, answer these questions: 1.Has time-out been applied every time the target behavior occurred? 2.Has the target behavior been adequately operationalized? 3.Was the student taught how to take time-out? 4.Have all sources of reinforcers been controlled while the student is in time-out? 5.Are you sure that the function of the misbehavior is attention?

25 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 25 Problem-Solving When Time-Out is Not Working (cont.) 6. Is the time-in environment reinforcement-rich? Does the student receive high levels of reinforcement for appropriate behavior? 7. Has time-out been implemented correctly by all personnel? 8. Has the student been required to complete requests or tasks that preceded the time-out?

26 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 26 So….Now What?? If the answer to any of these question is “no,” address the implementation issue before abandoning the technique or moving to a more restrictive technique.

27 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 27 So….Now What?? If all these questions are answered “yes,” you should do one of the following:  Use the same time-out procedure, but extend the length of time  Use a different time-out procedure  Use another procedure all together

28 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 28 Big Ideas! Time-out is defined in TAC § Time-out must not be locked, nor can students be prohibited from leaving time- out. Physical force cannot be used to place students in time-out. Time-out should be a consequence planned by each student’s IEP committee, and specified in the IEP and/or BIP.

29 Texas Behavior Support Initiative: Module 4 29 Big Ideas! Time-out must only be used in conjunction with an array of positive behavioral supports. (Time-in must be reinforcing!) The least restrictive form of time-out needed to effectively reduce the target behavior should be utilized. Time-out use must be documented, and the effects monitored in in IEP.


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