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Response to Intervention Using Personality Surveys & Research Based Interventions By Laura A. Riffel, Ph.D.

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Presentation on theme: "Response to Intervention Using Personality Surveys & Research Based Interventions By Laura A. Riffel, Ph.D."— Presentation transcript:

1 Response to Intervention Using Personality Surveys & Research Based Interventions By Laura A. Riffel, Ph.D.

2 Burgundy Interventions Based on Student Style Survey Laura A. Riffel, Ph.D.

3 BURGUNDY The hostile behavior in these students is usually directed at things rather than people. Vandalism is more common than fighting. Their behavior is likely to be unpredictable and to swing between impulsive and cautious responding both of which are harmful to school performance. Thus, the recommendations for High Porpoise and Low Eagle may at times be contradictory and educators must be careful when employing recommendations from one area that educators don’t push the student to the other extreme. Stimulation during work periods will usually interfere with their performance. However, stimulation following work, as a reward, will increase the amount and quality of future work. Once they become stimulated, it is necessary to get them settled down before any they can productively resume work. The best times for stimulating activities is during breaks, lunch, recess or at the end of the day. Students with this profile who have above average intelligence can be very creative, particularly in the areas of science and technology. Even so, they will not be pleasant to work with. Students with this profile who are of lower intelligence have more difficulty directing their behavior toward productive ends.

4 BURGUNDY Recommendations for LOW Eagle and HIGH Porpoise Students: Allow longer periods on a task for low Eagle students. A students IEP may need to include accommodations in timing. Educators should put less emphasis on praising low Eagle students after doing good work and more emphasis on reassuring them before they begin work. Give feedback to the low Eagle student in private. Students are motivated by private, deserved praise. Allow the low Eagle student to work individually as much as possible. Working individually may improve academic performance. Developing responsible and autonomous learners. Use opportunities to do individual tasks to reward appropriate group participation.

5 BURGUNDY The low Eagle student may have to be encouraged to be less cautious in responding to questions and giving opinions. Shaping the environment for increasing student participation. Test or question the low Eagle student immediately after he or she has studied material. Threats of negative consequences can be used effectively with low Eagle students. Use subdued, "serious looking" materials with low Eagle students. Avoid arousing (stimulating) the low Eagle student during school work. Putting the low Eagle student under pressure to perform well may lower performance, especially with difficult material. Details can be emphasized with low Eagle students.

6 BURGUNDY Encourage the low Eagle student to initiate interaction. Tips and examples for improving student-student classroom interaction. Teachers in the lower grades should concentrate on making their instruction more consistent with the learning styles of low Eagle students. low Eagle students, especially girls, should be encouraged to act in a more extraverted manner. Encouraging interaction by pairing with more confident student.

7 BURGUNDY CONTINUED Stimulating punishments should be avoided whenever possible. Use loud, stimulating activities to encourage appropriate behavior. Allow the high Porpoise student to work for short periods with frequent breaks. Have the high Porpoise student plan activities ahead of time and follow those plans in an orderly manner. Strategies for handling ADHD students-to-do lists, breaks, extra time, etc. Strategies for handling ADHD students-to-do lists, breaks, extra time, etc. Educators may have to remind the high Porpoise student about the overall goal occasionally during school work. Encourage the high Porpoise student to "stop and think" before responding. Material rewards may influence the high Porpoise student's behavior more than social rewards. Ideas for classroom rewards Rewards kids will crave Ideas for classroom rewards Rewards kids will crave Allow the high Porpoise student to work on creative projects as much as possible.

8 High Porpoise This child scored high on the Porpoise Scale. Here’s what that means:

9 Conduct Solitary and viewed as un-socialized. Frequently like odd and unusual things and have a marked disregard for danger. Tend to be defiant and aggressive.

10 Acquire Do not learn as easily from experience. Are sometimes thought of as hard headed. Have difficulty maintaining attention and concentrating in learning situations and tend to respond impulsively. When coupled with high intelligence tends to incline the student toward productive endeavors. Appear more original in their thinking and may be labeled creative. When associated with average to below average intelligence can incline students toward destructive activities. Teachers tend to find them troublesome.

11 Regulate Punishment and emotional displays are often counterproductive for these students. It may actually stimulate their behavior. Tend to be both disruptive and difficult to discipline. Highly structured environments employing both mild reward and punishments have the best chance of managing the behavior of High Porpoise students.

12 Excitement Find high levels of stimulation enjoyable and are prone to engage in exciting and dangerous activities without regard for the potential consequences. May seek confrontations and even punishment simply for the stimulation value such situations hold.

13 Low Eagle This child scored low on the Eagle Scale. Here’s what that means:

14 Conduct Tend to work slowly and make few errors. Will appear to be very motivated and attentive and will persist in most tasks.

15 Acquire Perform best under conditions of intermittent reinforcement or feedback. Recall material better immediately following learning or after a long delay. Typically do better in high school.

16 Regulate Respond to reward and punishment. Both reward and negative consequences should be low key.

17 Excitement Perform more poorly under external stress. Arousal to stress relative to the Eagle trait is primarily related to external stimulation (noise, cognitive, challenge, problem solving). Low arousal in easy or difficult tasks.

18 Low Rabbit This child scored low on the Rabbit Scale. Here’s what that means:

19 Conduct Mild or no reaction to emotional stimuli.

20 Acquire Tend to approach learning in an exploratory style. Study best for short periods broken up by other activities. Do better in elementary school.

21 Regulate Tend to be more receptive to reinforcement.

22 Excitement Often performs poorly on tasks because they are under-stimulated and under-motivated. External pressure can be used to enhance performance. High arousal level is best for easy tasks and relatively low arousal is best for difficult tasks.

23 High P- Low E- Low R p e r Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Praise work that is done well. Praise Counts: Using Self-Monitoring Article Allow to participate in group work, especially when he or she can lead Enlightening Advantages of Cooperative Grouping Use opportunities to work with other students to reward individual work. Cooperative Grouping Article on Reducing Anxiety Use only moderate stress. Article on Middle School and Stress Article that identifies what causes stress Give feedback in private. Feedback That Fits Article

24 Three Stars and A Wish is a great way to provide feedback to students and build their self esteem.

25 1.The way you used personification in this story really helped me visualize the setting. 2. The spacing of your cursive handwriting really made it easy for me to read. 3. The action words you chose made the climax of the story very pivotal. I wish you’d add some more detail describing the main characters. Way to go, I can’t wait to read it again.

26 High P- Low E- Low R p e r Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Threat of negative consequence is effective but actual punishment is harmful to performance. Wakefield, J., Goad, N.; 1981 Use relaxation techniques Conscious Breathing Relaxation Hypnosis Give a lot of emotional support Whole School Support for Vulnerable Students Use stimulating experience to encourage appropriate behavior. Wakefield, J., Goad, N.; 1981

27 p e r Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Give Opportunities for extended learning. Article on Extended Learning comparison for Kindergarten students Offer sound blocking devices when doing independent work. Blog on Noise Reduction Devices Use the One Sentence Intervention Use the Check-in/Check-out system Token economy Article relating to using token economy with impulsive and hyper students Love Notes given in private. I love the way you…… (Write it on a post-it note or post card. Either give it to the child in private or mail it to their home.) It has to be specific, positive, and true. 60 beats per minute music Gary Lamb has many CD’s with 60 beats per minute music; this is the normal resting heart rate. Considering that most students heart rise as high as 147 beats per minute prior to an aggressive act, it is plausible that listening to 60 beats per minute music will keep some students in a calmer state.Gary Lamb has many CD’s with 60 beats per minute music; this is the normal resting heart rate. Considering that most students heart rise as high as 147 beats per minute prior to an aggressive act, it is plausible that listening to 60 beats per minute music will keep some students in a calmer state.

28 p e r Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Step One: The teacher voices and models the steps of a problem Step Two: The teacher voices and the students model the steps of the problem Step Three: The students voice and model the steps of the problem Step Four: The students whisper and model the steps of the problem Step Five: The students think and model the steps of the problem.

29 Helping Students with Low-Self Esteem Climb Toward Success Laura A. Riffel

30 Self-esteem Gets “KILLED” while kids are in school. 80% of first graders have high self-esteem, 20% of fifth graders and 5% of high students –(J. Canfield)

31 Strengths AcademicSocial Have the behavior support team first focus on the student’s strengths- Develop at least four strengths for the team to focus on while thinking of interventions.

32 Needs AcademicSocial PhysicalMedical Mental Have the behavior support team focus on any areas where the student might need interventions: Be sure to think about: Academic needs Social needs Physical needs Medical needs Mental health needs

33 Settings and situations That might require intervention? Examples: After PE, After hall pass, before test, before reading aloud, when bored, when sick

34 Behaviors you targeted for change –Make sure they are measurable and observable.

35 What did the data show? Look at your data: What antecedents or setting events played into the behavior appearance? How often did the behaviors show up? What consequences occurred in the environment after the behavior occurred? Antecedent Behavior Consequence

36 What are your hypotheses? –Does the data indicate these behaviors are possibly due to low self-esteem?

37 Focus on the Four “P’s” P ublic Relations P roficiency P ower P hilanthropy

38 P ower: Use social autopsy sheets to help student see where situations went wrong. P ublic Relations: What skills can you give this student to help them relate better to others socially? P roficiency: What skills do they need to beef up academically? P hilanthropy: Help this student do something for others. A way to raise self- esteem is to help others less fortunate. student with Low Self- Esteem

39 Public Relations All students need to feel that they belong. Be their public relations person by letting their appropriate behavior earn the class a reward.

40 Some students who get complimented…. Do an opposite behavior because what you said about them doesn’t match how they feel about themselves. “I’m dumb. How could she think I’m smart? I’ll have to prove to her that I’m dumb because that’s how I feel about myself.”

41 Privately tell them: I know you are good at technology so I’d like you to run the SmartBoard® for me today while I work with the class.

42 Call on them for class reward: Act like it’s random- but call on the child to give the answer to five problems that you’ll do for the class instead of them having to do it for homework.

43 Proficiency Many behavioral issues occur because the student feels inadequate academically. Pre-teach part of the lesson in a study session, an online learning lab, or resource room.

44 Assessments Look at previous assessments and determine what areas the student is lacking skill- “Do whatever it takes to get that student caught up.”

45 Consider Learning Disabilities We don’t know what we don’t know- think about it. –A student may not know that everyone else sees the letters right side up or without a halo around it. –Help them figure out what works specific to themselves.

46 Power Give the child the power to control their destiny by giving them independence. Using options, teaching them to think “How’s this next decision going to affect me?”

47 Yoga

48 Karate I know it sounds counterintuitive to teach a student karate- but it’s all about “control” and “respect”- find a good instructor.

49 Social Autopsies See – forms and tools- social autopsy sheetwww.behaviordoctor.org

50 Philanthropy You will be surprised that these students are generally great working with younger students or students with disabilities. –Their behavior is typically more appropriate with younger and less able students.

51 World Philanthropy See At UBoosts' free web link, you can have students: plant 10 food producing seeds, protect 10 square feet of the Amazon Rain Forest, provide a day's worth a food for a villager in Uganda, help protect the Coral Triangle, offset your carbon footprint by 10 pounds, buy treats for dogs in shelters, provide fresh drinking water, or help villagers in Haiti. Click picture to go to website

52 Local Philanthropy

53 School Philanthropy

54 Once you put the Four P’s in Place Your student will PROSPER

55 Spelling Example Step One: Boys and Girls, I looked at our spelling words for the week and I think the most difficult word to spell is “muscles”. So I took the spelling and put it to the tune of Nestles chocolate. M-U-S- C-L-E-S, muscles make the very best, biceps. (The teacher sings the tune and writes the word on the board while the students watch.) Step Two: The teacher sings the tune while the students write the word. Step Three: The students sing the tune while they write the word. Step Four: The students whisper the tune while they write the word. Step Five: The students think the tune while they write the word. Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008

56 The state of Kansas What we K NOW:What We W ANT to Know: What we L EARNED Grow wheat Sunflower is state flower Buffalo is state mammal Shaped like a rectangle Meadowlark is state bird (List all the things the children say here) How many people live in Kansas? What are the biggest cities? What are the rivers in Kansas? Why did people originally come to Kansas? (List all the things the children want to know here) Use this section to review for the test by listing all the things you taught about Kansas – soliciting responses from the students.

57 Interventions p e r Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Cognitive Behavior Therapy Article on Depression in Teenagers and Using CBT Give verbal and visual clues about what’s important. Article on auditory and visual cues Tae Kwon Do Great article on school-based Tae Kwon Do with improved academic results

58 Mnemonic Interventions p e r Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Teach mnemonics for remembering difficult facts. For example: There- is a place it has the word “here” in it. Their- is a belonging it has the word “heir” in it. They’re- is a contraction it is a combination of “they are”. Another example: Every Good Boy Does Fine – to remember the line scales and FACE to remember the space scales on musical notes.

59 Secrets about Math

60 Music to Learn difficult facts

61 3-2-8 Paragraph for struggling writers The things I learned about Kansas included mythical creatures, state symbols, and land facts. There is a mythical creature called a jayhawk. The jayhawk is the mascot of the University of Kansas. The state flower is the sunflower. The state bird is the meadowlark. The main crop grown in Kansas is wheat. The geographical center of the United States is in Kansas. I learned some interesting facts about Kansas.

62 Interventions Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Educators should put less emphasis on praising Low Eagle students after doing good work and more emphasis on reassuring them before they begin work.

63 High P- Low E- High R Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Allow extra time to complete work. Keener, S. & Leaman, D.; 2007 Click the clock to visit the time timer website. Giving students a visual about length of time remaining will allow them to plan their work.

64 Interventions p e r Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Allow the Low Eagle student to work individually as much as possible. Use opportunities to do individual tasks to reward appropriate group participation. The Low Eagle student may have to be encouraged to be less cautious in responding to questions and giving opinions.

65 Act like a secret agent Give feedback to the Low Eagle student in private. Come in from behind them and whisper in their right ear- the right side of your brain is more conducive to compliance. BE Quick BE Quiet BE Gone

66 Check In Check Out Program Hawken & Horner (2007) Have the student check in with a preferred adult first thing in the morning- before they go to their first class. Have them check in again at the end of the day with this preferred adult. – This adult will check to see how the day is going and prevent things that might be brewing. – Some children will need to check in throughout the day.

67 Younger Children HUGS: – Hello – Update – Good-bye

68 Student-Teacher Rating Form Date: StudentHour OneHour TwoHour ThreeHour FourHour FiveHour Six Respect Self Respect Others Respect Property Total Points 3= Great Day- No or very few behavioral learning opportunities occurred 2= Pretty Good Day- few behavioral learning opportunities occurred 1= This day could have been better- more than a few behavioral learning opportunities occurred Student Signature: _________________________________________________ Teacher Signature: _________________________________________________ Parents' Signature: _________________________________________________ For younger students use smiling faces:

69 Check in- Check out Home check- in Earned reward Parent report to school Graph points Review points Graph points Adapted from Hawken 2008

70 Interventions p e r Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Test or question the Low Eagle student immediately after he or she has studied material. Use subdued, "serious looking" materials with Low Eagle students. Avoid arousing (stimulating) the Low Eagle student during school work.

71 Interventions p e r Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Putting the Low Eagle student under pressure to perform well may lower performance, especially with difficult material. Details can be emphasized with Low Eagle students. Encourage the Low Eagle student to initiate interaction.

72 Interventions p e r Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Teachers in the lower grades should concentrate on making their instruction more consistent with the learning styles of Low Eagle students. Low Eagle students, especially girls, should be encouraged to act in a more extraverted manner. Stimulating punishments should be avoided whenever possible.

73 Interventions p e r Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Use loud, stimulating activities to encourage appropriate behavior. Allow the High Porpoise student to work for short periods with frequent breaks. Have the High Porpoise student plan activities ahead of time and follow those plans in an orderly manner. Educators may have to remind the High Porpoise student about the overall goal occasionally during school work.

74 Interventions p e r Permission to copy as long as original author is cited "Riffel" copyright 2008 Encourage the High Porpoise student to "stop and think" before responding. Material rewards may influence the High Porpoise student's behavior more than social rewards. Allow the High Porpoise student to work on creative projects as much as possible


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