Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The Effective Reader (Updated Edition) by D. J. Henry Chapter 6: Transitions and Thought Patterns PowerPoint Presentation by Gretchen Starks-Martin St.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The Effective Reader (Updated Edition) by D. J. Henry Chapter 6: Transitions and Thought Patterns PowerPoint Presentation by Gretchen Starks-Martin St."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Effective Reader (Updated Edition) by D. J. Henry Chapter 6: Transitions and Thought Patterns PowerPoint Presentation by Gretchen Starks-Martin St. Cloud State University, MN © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers

2 Transitions and Thought Patterns Authors use two techniques to clearly show how ideas are related to one another: Transitions Thought Patterns

3 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Transitions Transitions are words and phrases that signal thought patterns by showing the logical relationships within a sentence and between sentences. Example: Fernando is actively involved in several community organizations. Children know Fernando likes them because he goes on all the Boy Scout camping trips and he coaches a youth soccer league.

4 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Thought Patterns Thought patterns are established by using transitions to show the logical relationship between ideas in a paragraph or passage.

5 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Example: Relationships Within a Sentence Weightlifting builds and tones muscles; it also builds bone density.

6 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Example: Relationships Between Sentences Robert and Dorothy had a fantastic time when they vacationed at Valhalla Resort on Marathon Key in Florida. They woke up before dawn every day so that they would not miss the beautiful sunrises….

7 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Thought Patterns Thought patterns (or patterns of organization) are signaled by using transitions to show the logical relationship between ideas in a paragraph, passage, or textbook chapter. Some common patterns are: Time Order Space Order Listing Classification

8 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers The Time Order Pattern The time order thought pattern generally shows a chain of events. The actions or events are listed in the order in which they occur (chronological order). There are two types: Narration Process

9 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Transitions Used in the Time Order Pattern for Narration After Afterward As Before Currently During Eventually Finally First Last Later While Meanwhile Next Now Often Previously Second Since Soon Then Ultimately Until When

10 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Example When Corbin decided to become a teacher, he had no idea that he was also deciding to become a career student. His first notions of wanting only a bachelor’s degree were quickly dispelled. During those early years as a teacher, he found that the more he learned the more excited he was about teaching. Eventually, his passion for learning earned him a master’s degree and a doctorate degree.

11 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Transitions Used in the Time Order Pattern for Process (Steps, Stages, or Directions) After Afterward As Before Currently During Eventually Finally First Last Later While Meanwhile Next Now Often Previously Second Since Soon Then Ultimately Until When

12 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Example To ensure proper interdental cleaning, floss each day. First, break off about 18 inches of floss and wind most of it around one of your middle fingers. Second, wind the remaining floss around the same finger of the opposite hand. Third, hold the floss tightly between your thumbs and forefingers. Next, guide the floss between your teeth using a gentle rubbing motion; never snap the floss into the gums. Then gently slide it into the space between the gum and tooth.

13 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Space Order Pattern The space order pattern allows authors to describe a person, place, or thing based on its location or the way it is arranged in space. The writer often uses descriptive details to help readers create vivid mental pictures.

14 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Transition Words in the Space Order Pattern Above Across Adjacent Around At the bottom At the side At the top Back At the side Backup Behind Below Beneath Beside Beyond By Center Close to Down Far away Farther Front Here In Inside Left Middle Next to Nearby Outside Right There Under Underneath Within

15 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Example From their heads to the tips of their tails, humpback whales bear distinctive markings. On top a humpback whale is dotted with fleshy knobs called tubercles; a strand of hair with many nerve endings grows out of each tubercle.

16 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers The Listing Pattern Authors list a series or set of reasons, details, or points. Changing the order of the details does not change their meaning.

17 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Addition Transitions Used in the Listing Pattern And Also Furthermore Another Besides Final Finally First First of all For one thing In addition Last Last of all Moreover Next One Second Third

18 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Example An animal as large and beautiful as a horse needs to be cared for carefully. First, cleaning its stall on a regular basis is absolutely necessary. In addition, a horse needs to be groomed 3-5 times a week. Finally, a horse needs to be fed and exercised on a daily basis.

19 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers The Classification Pattern Authors use the classification pattern to sort ideas into smaller groups and describe the traits of each group. Each smaller group, called a subgroup, is based on shared traits or characteristics.

20 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Transitions Used in the Classification Pattern Another (group, kind, type) Characteristics First (group, categories, kind, type) Second (group, categories, kind, type) Order Traits

21 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Example “Wetlands” is a general term that includes several types of vital links between water and land. One type of wetland is a bog; it is characterized by spongy peat deposits, acidic waters, and is covered by a carpet of sphagnum moss. Another type of wetland is the marsh, which is a wetland frequently swamped with water; it is characterized by soft-stemmed vegetation. Finally, a swamp is a type of wetland dominated by woody plants.

22 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Thought Patterns in Textbooks Textbook authors use transitions to make relationships between ideas clear and easy to understand. Often authors mix thought patterns in the same passage or paragraph. The effective reader looks for the author’s primary thought pattern.

23 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Chapter Review Transitions are words and phrases that show the relationships between ideas. A thought pattern is established by using transitions to show the logical relationship between ideas in a paragraph or passage. Narration and process are two uses of the time order thought pattern. Transitions of time signal that the writer is describing when something occurred. In addition to showing a chain of events, the time order pattern is used to show steps, stages, or directions that can be repeated at any time with similar results.

24 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Chapter Review Transitions of addition, such as and, also, and furthermore, are generally used to indicate a listing pattern. Authors use the classification pattern to sort ideas into smaller groups and describe the traits for each group. Examples of classification signal words are first type, second kind, or another group. The space order pattern allows authors to describe a person, place, or thing based on its location or the way it is arranged in space. Some of the words used to establish the space order pattern include adjacent, below, and underneath.

25 © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers Practice Remember to complete your scorecard for the Review Tests in this chapter. Complete the Applications, Review Tests, and Mastery Tests for Chapter 6 in your textbook.


Download ppt "The Effective Reader (Updated Edition) by D. J. Henry Chapter 6: Transitions and Thought Patterns PowerPoint Presentation by Gretchen Starks-Martin St."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google