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 Parenting skills do not always come naturally or easily.  Parenting is a learning process that occurs each day.  Parents have to work at it.  Parents.

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Presentation on theme: " Parenting skills do not always come naturally or easily.  Parenting is a learning process that occurs each day.  Parents have to work at it.  Parents."— Presentation transcript:

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2  Parenting skills do not always come naturally or easily.  Parenting is a learning process that occurs each day.  Parents have to work at it.  Parents must understand and meet children’s needs

3  Physical- food, clothing, shelter, health and safety.  Emotional and Social › feeling safe, loved, cared for › learn how to make friends and work with others  Intellectual- stimulation, opportunity to learn, and become educated

4  A lack of the critical needs and encouraging environment that are essential for physical, emotional, and intellectual well-being.  Children may fall behind other children their own age in their overall development.

5  How parents and other caregivers care for and discipline children.  No one parenting style is right or wrong  You pick the style that works with your personality and for your child

6  Authoritarian › The parent believes the child should obey them without question. › The parent tells a child what to do and it’s the child’s responsibility to do it. › When rules are broken, the parent responds quickly and firmly.

7  Assertive-Democratic › Children have more input into the rules and limits of the home. › Learning to take responsibility is important- children are given a certain amount of freedom and independence within the rules. › When rules are broken- learn best from accepting the results of their actions  Work together to find an acceptable punishment.

8  Permissive › Parents give children a wide range of freedom. › Children may set their own rules › Parents ignore rule breaking

9  Guidance- using firmness and understanding to help children learn how to behave  Outcome of Effective Guidance › To learn self-discipline (ability to control one’s own behavior.) › Get along with others & how to deal with their feelings in acceptable ways. › Promotes security and positive self-esteem › The difference between right and wrong › Develop a conscience

10  Be a Role Model  Give Effective Direction  Set Limits

11  Children learn best by being shown what to do, rather than just being told what to do.  Parents need to demonstrate at all times the behavior they would like to see in their own children.

12  Be sure you have the child’s attention.  Be polite.  Use positive statements.  Use specific words that the child can understand.  Begin with an action verb  Give a limited number of directions at a time  Be clear.  Give praise and love

13  Children need limits to grow into responsible adults.  Limits should keep children from hurting themselves, other people, or property.  Children will respect and follow guidelines if they are reasonable.  Parents need to be consistent in enforcing limits

14  Ask Yourself: › Does the limit allow the child to learn, explore, and grow? › Is the limit fair and appropriate for the child’s age? › Does the limit benefit the child, or is it just for the adult’s convenience?

15 What is deprivation?  A lack of the critical needs and encouraging environment that are essential for physical, emotional, and intellectual well-being. How does deprivation affect children?  Children may fall behind other children their own age in their overall development.

16 What are the 3 types of Parenting Styles?  Authoritarian  Assertive-Democratic  Permissive

17 What are the 3 ways you can encourage appropriate behavior?  Be a Role Model  Give Effective Directions  Set Limits

18  Limits must be › stated simply, briefly, and in a calm, direct tone. › Be clear. › Firmly and consistently enforced  Limits may often need to be repeated or explained in another way.  Redirection is important. It suggests that the child does something else

19  Is the expected behavior appropriate, given the child’s age and development?  Does the child understand that the behavior was wrong?  Did the child do the behavior knowingly and deliberately, or was it beyond the child’s control?

20  Correct behavior is important and there are consequences for poor choices. THE MESSAGE:  Parents should clearly show they disapprove of the behavior but they still love the child.  Warnings are okay.

21  A response that encourages a particular behavior.  When children learn that an action wins attention and approval from adults, they are likely to repeat that actions.

22  Be specific  Comment on the behavior as soon as possible.  Recognize small steps.  Help children take pride in their actions.  Tailor the encouragement to the needs of the child.  Use positive reinforcement wisely

23  A response aimed at strengthening desired behavior by removing an unpleasant trigger.

24  Natural Consequences › Children suffer from the actual result of their action. › Parents do not lecture  Logical Consequences › Connected to the misbehavior › Parents need to follow through

25  Loss of Privileges › Take away a privilege › Appropriate for 5 or older  Time Out › A short period in which a child sits away from other people and the center of activity. › Not their room

26  Bribing  Making Children to Behave  Shouting or Yelling  Shaming or belittling  Threatening to Withhold Love  Exaggerating Consequences

27  Being consistent, or continually the same, is key to guiding children’s behavior.  Helps children know what is expected of them and the expected discipline.  Children lose trust and confidence in the caregiver who constantly change rules or fail to enforce rules in a consistent way.


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