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Welcome to the Fall Institute! Quick Introductions Review Agenda Review Folder.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome to the Fall Institute! Quick Introductions Review Agenda Review Folder."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to the Fall Institute! Quick Introductions Review Agenda Review Folder

2 Session Objectives What is RtI for Behavior and Academics? What is RtI for Behavior and Academics? How do we implement? How do we implement? Why use an RtI Model? Why use an RtI Model?

3 NPR: Japanese Structure Withstands Earthquake Test NPR: Japanese Structure Withstands Earthquake Test

4 The significant problems we have cannot be solved at the same level of thinking with which we created them. Albert Einstein ( )

5 What is RtI? An operational framework for improving academic and behavioral outcomes for all students.

6 Continuity of Services in RtI All/School WideSome/TargetedFew/High Risk All/School WideSome/TargetedFew/High Risk Scope of Service Intensity of Service

7 Response to Intervention A Tiered Approach to Instructing All Students Response to Intervention A Tiered Approach to Instructing All Students

8 RTI Guiding Principles All students are part of ONE proactive educational system All students are part of ONE proactive educational system Use scientific, research-based instruction and interventions Use scientific, research-based instruction and interventions Data are used to guide instructional decisions Data are used to guide instructional decisions Use instructionally relevant assessments that are reliable and valid Use instructionally relevant assessments that are reliable and valid (Screening, Diagnostic, Progress Monitoring)

9 RTI Guiding Principles Use a problem solving method to make decisions based on a continuum of student needs Use a problem solving method to make decisions based on a continuum of student needs Quality professional development supports effective instruction for ALL students Quality professional development supports effective instruction for ALL students Leadership is vital Leadership is vital

10 Content BIG Ideas

11 Innovation Process Outcomes1 Practices3 Systems4 Supporting Staff Behavior Supporting Student Behavior Supporting Decision Making Information2

12 Problem-Solving Process What is the problem? What should be done? Why is it happening? Did it work?

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14 How do we implement?

15 Phases of Systematic Implementation Consensus Building Consensus Building Infrastructure Developing Infrastructure Developing Implementation Doing Implementation Doing Continuous Improvement Refining Continuous Improvement Refining

16 Consensus : Building TOOLS TO USE: Fist to Five Fist to Five Formula for Success Formula for Success Managing Complex Change Managing Complex Change Staff Surveys Staff Surveys

17 Fist to Five: Quick Check 5 fingers 5 fingers 4 fingers 4 fingers 3 fingers 3 fingers All for it… I can be a leader for this decision All for it… I can be a leader for this decision All for it …You can count on me to support this no matter what All for it …You can count on me to support this no matter what For the idea…I will support it in concept but may not be out in front implementation For the idea…I will support it in concept but may not be out in front implementation

18 Fist to Five Quick Check 2 fingers 2 fingers 1 finger 1 finger Fist Fist I’m not sure…But I trust the group’s opinion and will not sabotage the decision I’m not sure…But I trust the group’s opinion and will not sabotage the decision I’m not sure…Can we talk some more? I’m not sure…Can we talk some more? No…We need to find an alternative No…We need to find an alternative

19 Building Consensus- “How To Do It” If anyone holds up a fist, or only one or two fingers, the group has not reached consensus and there needs to be more discussion or dialog. If anyone holds up a fist, or only one or two fingers, the group has not reached consensus and there needs to be more discussion or dialog. If you get all three, four, or five fingers showing, you can declare consensus If you get all three, four, or five fingers showing, you can declare consensus Adapted from: Heartland

20 BI Big Ideas A & B BI Big Ideas A & B CI Core Instruction CI Core Instruction 3A Assessments (screening, diagnostic, progress) 3A Assessments (screening, diagnostic, progress) SI Supplemental Intervention SI Supplemental Intervention II Intensive Intervention II Intensive Intervention Efforts lack focus and priority. There is not a focus on important priority skills for improvement. BI Big Ideas A & B BI Big Ideas A & B BI Big Ideas A & B BI Big Ideas A & B BI Big Ideas A & B BI Big Ideas A & B BI Big Ideas A & B BI Big Ideas A & B BI Big Ideas A & B BI Big Ideas A & B CI Core Instruction CI Core Instruction CI Core Instruction CI Core Instruction CI Core Instruction CI Core Instruction CI Core Instruction CI Core Instruction CI Core Instruction CI Core Instruction 3A Assessments (screening, diagnostic, progress) 3A Assessments (screening, diagnostic, progress) 3A Assessments (screening, diagnostic, progress) 3A Assessments (screening, diagnostic, progress) 3A Assessments (screening, diagnostic, progress) 3A Assessments (screening, diagnostic, progress) 3A Assessments (screening, diagnostic, progress) 3A Assessments (screening, diagnostic, progress) 3A Assessments (screening, diagnostic, progress) 3A Assessments (screening, diagnostic, progress) SI Supplemental Intervention SI Supplemental Intervention SI Supplemental Intervention SI Supplemental Intervention SI Supplemental Intervention SI Supplemental Intervention SI Supplemental Intervention SI Supplemental Intervention SI Supplemental Intervention SI Supplemental Intervention II Intensive Intervention II Intensive Intervention II Intensive Intervention II Intensive Intervention II Intensive Intervention II Intensive Intervention II Intensive Intervention II Intensive Intervention II Intensive Intervention II Intensive Intervention Overall low achievement and student learning problems across all subgroup areas. Lack of direction to know what needs to be improved, who needs intervention, and whether or not interventions have been effective. Lack of resources due to attempts to provide intensive interventions for those students whose needs could be met through supplemental interventions Gap increases between average and “at risk students”. Continued low performance for some subgroups Success = = = = = =

21 Team Processing: 7 minutes What key components are our strengths and why? What key components are our strengths and why? What key components are our weaknesses and why? What key components are our weaknesses and why? Congratulations! You just completed a simple needs assessment! You’ll want this information as you talk about Infrastructure. Congratulations! You just completed a simple needs assessment! You’ll want this information as you talk about Infrastructure.

22 = ChangeConfusion = = = = =++++Vision SkillsIncentivesResources ActionPlan ++++ Skills IncentivesResourcesActionPlan Vision Incentives Resources ActionPlan ++++ VisionSkills Resources ActionPlan ++++ VisionSkills Incentives ActionPlan ++++ Vision SkillsIncentives Resources Adapted from Knoster, T. Anxiety Resistance False Starts Frustration Managing Complex Change

23 Team Activity: 5 minutes As a Team, rank your challenges biggest to smallest: As a Team, rank your challenges biggest to smallest: Confusion Confusion Anxiety Anxiety Resistance Resistance Frustration Frustration False Starts False Starts How can we use this information? How can we share it with staff? How can we use this information? How can we share it with staff?

24 Infrastructure: Developing Building Leadership Team Building Leadership Team Guiding Questions (found in PS flip book) Guiding Questions (found in PS flip book) Professional Development Professional Development Nuts & Bolts Nuts & Bolts Scheduling, Instructors, Materials, Documentation, Progress Monitoring, etc. Scheduling, Instructors, Materials, Documentation, Progress Monitoring, etc. More from Dr. Mark Shinn… More from Dr. Mark Shinn…

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26 How Does It Fit Together? Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 1 All students at a grade level FallFallWinterWinterSpringSpring Universal Screening Additional Diagnostic Assessment Instruction Results/Monitorin g Individual Diagnostic Individual Instruction Group Diagnostic Small Group Differentiated by Skill None Continue with Core Instruction Core Instruction Grades Classroom Assessments Utah CRT Intensive 1-5 % Supplemental5-10% Core80-90% Weekly 2x month

27 CLARIFYING EXPECTATIONS Addl.DiagnosticAssessment InstructionResultsMonitoring IndividualDiagnosticIndividualizedIntensiveweekly All Students at a grade level Fall Winter Spring Screening None ContinueWithCoreInstructionGradesClassroomAssessments Yearly ITBS/ITED GroupDiagnostic SmallGroupDifferen-tiated By Skill 2 times/month Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Supplemental 1-5% 5-10% 80-90% Core Intensive Teacher will make sure: 1. All students have been given the DIBELS assessment 2. All data has been entered 3. A copy of the class-wide data is printed is printed Questions/concerns: Contact Building Principal Teacher will: 1.Calculate what percent of the class is at benchmark 2. If below 80%, determine “core” instructional needs “core” instructional needs (Beef-up based on data) Questions/Concerns: K-3 Contact Reading Teachers 4-6 Contact ____-building teacher w/reading background Teacher will: 1.Place all non-proficient students into the 4-Boxes 2.Determine if there is a need for additional diagnostic assessment(s) -see grade level sheet -see grade level sheet 3.Ensure diagnostic assessments are given assessments are given 4.Bring all data to grade level meetings Questions/Concerns: K-3 Contact Reading Teachers 4-6 Contact _____ Building Teacher with Rdg. Background Grade Level Data Meetings: 1.Discuss briefly additions/changes made to core 2.Share 4-Box data and other diagnostic data results. 3. Group kids with similar instructional needs.(COMPARE TO PRIOR GROUPING- IF AVAILABLE) 4. Complete the group intervention Plan form.(one per group) -Who, what, when, where of instruction -Who, what, when, where of monitoring -Who and when of parent notification NOTE: if any changes are made during Intervention period, document on form. 5. Attach an implementation log and graphs 6. Set date to meet back for check-in (4-6 weeks) Questions/Concerns: District Based Team& IDM Team, Content Specialist Prior to Grade Level Data Meetings

28 CLARIFYING EXPECTATIONS Addl.DiagnosticAssessment InstructionResultsMonitoring IndividualDiagnosticIndividualizedIntensiveweekly All Students at a grade level Fall Winter Spring Screening None ContinueWithCoreInstructionGradesClassroomAssessments Yearly ITBS/ITED GroupDiagnostic SmallGroupDifferen-tiated By Skill 2 times/month Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Supplemental 1-5% 5-10% 80-90% Core Intensive Teacher will: Grade Level Data Meetings: Prior to Grade Level Data Meetings

29 Implementation: Doing ABC-UBI Team Self Assessment (Afternoon Team Time) ABC-UBI Team Self Assessment (Afternoon Team Time) Blue Print Blue Print Where are you with implementation? 5 Minutes Where are you with implementation? 5 Minutes Action Plan/Funding Request Action Plan/Funding Request CHAMPS Session this afternoon CHAMPS Session this afternoon

30 Continuous Improvement: Refining What’s working and how can I do more of it? What’s working and how can I do more of it? Other concepts from the book, SWITCH Other concepts from the book, SWITCH

31 Triangle Song: James Blunt on Sesame Street Triangle Song: James Blunt on Sesame Street

32 Build a Community of Competence IntensiveSupplementalCore

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38 Why use an RtI Model?

39 “To often, students of all ages come to class struggling with life challenges that can interfere with instruction, impeded achievement, and undermine school climate. Preventing or remedying such barriers is critical to school success.” -National Association of School Psychologists, August 2008

40 Make a list of potential factors RISK FACTORS/ LIFE CHALLENGES PROTECTIVE FACTORS

41 “If you want to bring about a fundamental change in people’s belief and behavior, a change that will persist and serve as an example to others, you need to create a community around them, where those new beliefs can be practiced and expressed and nurtured”. Malcolm Gladwell, The Tipping Point

42 Good Teaching is Good Teaching Good teaching is good teaching and there are NO boundaries on when, where, or for what or whom it will occur Teaching academics without attention to behavior IS NOT evidence based practice Teaching behavior without attention to academics is unsound practice In efforts to improve achievement, they cannot be separated Algozzine, 2008

43 BLSignificance Behavior Instruction Reading Instruction Reading and Behavior Instruction RB RB RB The Need for Academic & Behavioral Integration Source: Shepard Kellam, Ph.D, Senior Research Fellow, American Institutes for Research (AIR)

44 The Need for Academic & Behavioral Integration Academic skill learning is stunted when children’s emotional needs are not met (Adelman & Taylor, 1997). Academic skill learning is stunted when children’s emotional needs are not met (Adelman & Taylor, 1997). Children’s academic achievement in the 8 th grade could be better predicted by their social abilities at 3 rd grade, rather than their academic achievement at 3 rd grade (Caprara, Barbanelli, Pastorelli, Bandura & Zimbardo, 2000). Children’s academic achievement in the 8 th grade could be better predicted by their social abilities at 3 rd grade, rather than their academic achievement at 3 rd grade (Caprara, Barbanelli, Pastorelli, Bandura & Zimbardo, 2000). Academic skill and social competence are complimentary skills, particularly in the long run (Malecki & Elliott, 2002). Academic skill and social competence are complimentary skills, particularly in the long run (Malecki & Elliott, 2002). Academic skill-deficits greatly exacerbate antisocial behavior (Walker, Ramsey, & Graham, 2003). Academic skill-deficits greatly exacerbate antisocial behavior (Walker, Ramsey, & Graham, 2003).

45 The Need for Academic & Behavioral Integration Social skills instruction and character education programs lead to improvements in on-task behavior, academic engagement, and academic achievement test scores (Elliott, 1999). Social skills instruction and character education programs lead to improvements in on-task behavior, academic engagement, and academic achievement test scores (Elliott, 1999). Much inappropriate behavior is occasioned by task demands that are beyond the capabilities and skills of students (Kauffman, Mostert, Trent, & Hallahan, 2003). Much inappropriate behavior is occasioned by task demands that are beyond the capabilities and skills of students (Kauffman, Mostert, Trent, & Hallahan, 2003). Of commonly used school ‑ based interventions, focused academic interventions and behavioral instruction show the highest effect in preventing school dropout or nonattendance (Lehr, Hansen, Sinclair, & Christenson, 2003) and adolescent drug and alcohol use (Wilson, Gottfredson, & Najakia, 2001). Of commonly used school ‑ based interventions, focused academic interventions and behavioral instruction show the highest effect in preventing school dropout or nonattendance (Lehr, Hansen, Sinclair, & Christenson, 2003) and adolescent drug and alcohol use (Wilson, Gottfredson, & Najakia, 2001). Thirty ‑ five percent of children with reading disabilities drop out of school, a rate twice that of their classmates; fifty percent of juvenile delinquents manifest some kind of learning disability, primarily in the area of reading (Get Ready to Read, 2002). Thirty ‑ five percent of children with reading disabilities drop out of school, a rate twice that of their classmates; fifty percent of juvenile delinquents manifest some kind of learning disability, primarily in the area of reading (Get Ready to Read, 2002).

46 Student Perception Research (Suldo, Friedrich, White, Farmer, Minch, Michalowski, 2009) Teacher Behaviors= High level of support Uses diverse teaching strategies Uses diverse teaching strategies Provides evaluative feedback on performance Provides evaluative feedback on performance Responsive to entire class’s understanding of material Responsive to entire class’s understanding of material Show’s interest in an individual student’s progress Show’s interest in an individual student’s progress Helps student improve grades Helps student improve grades Treats students similarly Treats students similarly Punishes in a fair manner Punishes in a fair manner Teacher Behaviors= Low level of support Reliance on single mode of instruction Reliance on single mode of instruction Does not help students improve grades Does not help students improve grades Assigns an overwhelming workload Assigns an overwhelming workload Treats students in a biased manner Treats students in a biased manner Insufficient interest in student’s academic progress Insufficient interest in student’s academic progress Punishes in an incorrect manner Punishes in an incorrect manner

47 Probability Equation p B C A Student Characteristics: skills, history, Family/culture, functional desires, School/Teacher Control: curriculum, expectations, routines, examples, physical arrangements, engagement, prompts, time, feedback Desired State: measureable outcomes (skills, behaviors)

48 Building a Probability Equation C Desired State: measureable outcomes (skills, behaviors) Step One – Define success: What is success and how will we know it when we see it? What do successful (districts, schools, student like and do? How much is required in order for us to think what we’re doing is working? What are measureable benchmarks on the way to our goal?

49 Probability Equation A Student Characteristics: skills, history, Family/culture, functional desires Step Two– Understand Problem: What are the relevant characteristics of the problem? What is known/in place and what needs instruction? What is the history of success/failure with this issue? What functional relationships exist between the problem and the environment? problem and the environment?

50 Probability Equation B School/Teacher Control: curriculum, expectations, routines, examples, physical arrangements, engagement, prompts, time, feedback Step Three – Alter Instructional and Environmental Variables: Teach the key skills/rules? -when, where, how should it happen? -effective modeling, examples, prompts, feedback -allow sufficient time for success Create effective environments -consistency -natural prompts, natural consequences -arrange environment to avoid failures/promote success

51 Probability Equation (Scott, 2009) p Student Characteristic s School/Teacher Control Desired State:

52 “You must be the change you wish to see in the world” -Mohandas Gandhi

53 Think Different: Apple Commercial Think Different: Apple Commercial


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