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Identification of High Potential Students Scaling-Up Project CRITICAL Harlem Renaissance Technology Center August 22, 2007 Sheelah Sweeny University of.

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Presentation on theme: "Identification of High Potential Students Scaling-Up Project CRITICAL Harlem Renaissance Technology Center August 22, 2007 Sheelah Sweeny University of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Identification of High Potential Students Scaling-Up Project CRITICAL Harlem Renaissance Technology Center August 22, 2007 Sheelah Sweeny University of Connecticut

2 Two Types of Giftedness 1.Schoolhouse or lesson-learning giftedness 2.Creative/Productive giftedness

3 Conservative vs. Liberal Identification Methods Conservative –IQ/Cognitive test scores only –Top 1%-5% of student population –Under representation of culturally, linguistically, economically diverse & twice exceptional students Liberal –Multiple identification criteria –Top 10%-15% of student population –More inclusive

4 Factors Influencing Gifted Behavior Personality Factors –Perception of Self, Self-Efficacy –Courage –Character –Intuition –Charm/Charisma –Need for Achievement –Ego Strength –Energy –Sense of Destiny –Personal Attractiveness Environmental Factors –SES –Parental Personalities –Education of Parents –Stimulation of Childhood Interests –Family Position –Formal Education –Role Model Availability –Physical Illness and/or Well Being –Chance Factors –Zeitgeist

5 Above Average Ability: Characteristics General Ability –High levels of abstract thinking, verbal & numerical reasoning, spatial relations, memory and word fluency –Adapts to novel situations –Automization of information processing; rapid, accurate & selective retrieval of information Above Average Ability

6 Above Average Ability: Characteristics Specific Ability –Application of various combinations of general abilities to one or more specialized areas of knowledge or performance –Capacity for acquiring and using advanced knowledge, techniques, logistics and strategies –Capacity to determine relevance of information Above Average Ability

7 Task Commitment: Characteristics High levels of interest, enthusiasm, fascination, & involvement Shows perseverance, endurance, determination, hard work & dedicated practice Self-confident, belief in own ability, driven to achieve Ability to identify problems; tune in to new developments in field Sets high standards, open to criticism, developing sense of taste, quality & excellence about work products Task Commitment

8 Creativity: Characteristics Fluency, flexibility & originality of thought Openness to experience; receptive to new and different thoughts, actions & products Curious, speculative, adventurous, and “mentally playful”; willing to take risks in thought and action; uninhibited Sensitive to detail, aesthetic characteristics of ideas and things; willing to act on and react to external stimulation and own ideas and feelings Creativity

9 Three Ring Conception of Giftedness Giftedness Is Evident

10 Giftedness Appears… C A U I C TP Under Certain Circumstances In Certain People At Certain Times

11 Identifying Talent Pool Students What are we looking for? –Learning Profile? –Personality Traits? –IQ?

12 Decision #1 - Before Choosing an Identification Model What organizational model(s) will we use? –How do we group kids and move them around? –How many students can we provide services so that we have a “Visibility of Effect?” What pedagogical model(s) will guide our work? –What we do with kids within any grouping or organizational patterns. (e.g. Johns Hopkins, Mentor Connection)

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14 There should be a direct relationship between the identification system and the types of services provided by the program! -Joe Renzulli My Golden Rule of Gifted Education

15 The Renzulli Identification System Based on the 3-Ring Conception of Giftedness & the Enrichment Triad Model Strives for equity, excellence & economy Designed to be flexible (e.g. to follow state guidelines on cut-off scores) Based on research of behavioral characteristics of highly creative & productive people

16 The Renzulli Identification System Goals: Develop creativity and/or task commitment in Talent Pool students & other students who come to an educator’s attention through alternate means of identification Provide learning experiences & support systems that promote interaction of creativity, task commitment, & above average ability Provide opportunities, resources, & encouragement for the development & application of gifted behaviors

17 Identification Considerations There is no perfect identification system! There should be a direct relationship between the identification system and the services to be provided to develop the students’ gifts and talents. The system does not determine if a student is “gifted” or “not gifted.” Rather, it identifies students who would benefit most from supplementary services.

18 Identification Considerations The difference between high performance and high potential is critical: –high potential students may require different kinds of programming options than high performing students Establish local norms –use grade level, similarity of learning opportunities & background characteristics rather than national norms

19 Identification Considerations Target specific behaviors and potentials rather than using generic labels (e.g. moderately gifted, highly gifted) Label the services, not the students The program must have “Visibility of Effect”

20 5 Things to Avoid Criticisms of “watering down” Getting into legal difficulties (bumper sticker parents) Pitting parents of advantaged children against parents of disadvantaged children Leading people to believe that any one instrument is the answer to identification Proliferating the amount of paperwork

21 Decision #2 - Make Before Proceeding to Identification Determine size of Talent Pool –Number of students you can serve and be able to achieve “Visibility of Effect” –Effect of direct & indirect services you can develop through schoolwide involvement of other teachers & outside resources –Planned growth over time

22 Talent Pool Membership Students who demonstrate above average ability on cognitive tests Students who would most benefit from supplementary services May be based on state guidelines

23 Test Score Criteria [Approximately 50% of The Talent Pool] Non-Test Criteria [Approximately 50% of The Talent Pool] Total Talent Pool Consists of Approximately 15% of the General Population Renzulli Identification System Step 1 99 th %ile 92 nd %ile Test Score Nominations [Automatic, and Based on Local Norms] Step 2 Teacher Nominations [Automatic Except in Cases of Teachers Who Are Over or Under Nominators] Step 3Alternative Pathways Case Study Special Nominations Step 4 Case Study Notification of Parents Step 5 Action Information Nominations Step 6

24 Alternate Pathways May include: –parent, peer and self nominations –Creativity assessments –Product evaluations –Other measures Allow for non-traditional students to receive services

25 Two Types of Identification 1.Status Information -- Anything you can put down on paper beforehand that tells you something about the student. 2. Action Information -- Things that you can only document when they are happening or after they happen.

26 Status Information Grades Test scores Student work samples Interest, learning styles & expression style surveys Teacher input (any/all teachers) Parent input Students’ self- nomination Peer nominations

27 Action Information Teacher observations Work habits Thinking Questioning Leadership qualities Peer interactions Skill development Conversations Interviews Video/audio recordings

28 Identifying Talent Pool Students Local decision for criteria Use multiple criteria Look beyond the obvious - look for potential as well as talent that is already developed

29 Identifying Talent Pool Students Local decision for criteria Use multiple criteria Look beyond the obvious - look for potential as well as talent that is already developed

30 Decision #2 - Make Before Proceeding to Identification Determine size of Talent Pool –Number of students you can serve and be able to achieve “Visibility of Effect” –Effect of direct & indirect services you can develop through schoolwide involvement of other teachers & outside resources –Planned growth over time

31 Talent Pool Membership Students who demonstrate above average ability on cognitive tests Students who would most benefit from supplementary services May be based on state guidelines

32 Test Score Criteria [Approximately 50% of The Talent Pool] Non-Test Criteria [Approximately 50% of The Talent Pool] Total Talent Pool Consists of Approximately 15% of the General Population Renzulli Identification System Step 1 99 th %ile 92 nd %ile Test Score Nominations [Automatic, and Based on Local Norms] Step 2 Teacher Nominations [Automatic Except in Cases of Teachers Who Are Over or Under Nominators] Step 3Alternative Pathways Case Study Special Nominations Step 4 Case Study Notification of Parents Step 5 Action Information Nominations Step 6

33 Alternate Pathways May include: –parent, peer and self nominations –Creativity assessments –Product evaluations –Other measures Allow for non-traditional students to receive services

34 Top 1% IQ Reading, Writing, Math Top 5-10% IQ Reading, Writing, Math Top 10-15% Alternate Pathways

35 Two Types of Identification 1.Status Information -- Anything you can put down on paper beforehand that tells you something about the student. 2. Action Information -- Things that you can only document when they are happening or after they happen.

36 Status Information Grades Test scores Student work samples Interest, learning styles & expression style surveys Teacher input (any/all teachers) Parent input Students’ self- nomination Peer nominations

37 Action Information Teacher observations Work habits Thinking Questioning Leadership qualities Peer interactions Skill development Conversations Interviews Video/audio recordings

38 Don’t go! I’m sure page 3 of Billy’s Gifted Matrix Checklist No. 5.3 (a) is in here somewhere.

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44 Other Tools Additional information that can help to identify individual strengths that guide differentiation for high performance and high potential students within the gifted program and in general education…

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