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1 Army Diversity 8 December 2010. 2 “As we continue to expand the knowledge and understanding of the diversity within our ranks, not only will our strength,

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Presentation on theme: "1 Army Diversity 8 December 2010. 2 “As we continue to expand the knowledge and understanding of the diversity within our ranks, not only will our strength,"— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Army Diversity 8 December 2010

2 2 “As we continue to expand the knowledge and understanding of the diversity within our ranks, not only will our strength, versatility, and efficiency be amplified, but we will be more effective in understanding the cultures and environments where we serve. We expect all leaders to develop and maintain an inclusive environment that will sustain the Army as a relevant and ready Force.” Army Policy on Diversity Senior Leader Diversity Message

3 3 Army Definition of Diversity The different attributes, experiences, and backgrounds of our Soldiers, Civilians and Family Members that further enhance our global capabilities and contribute to an adaptive, culturally astute Army. How Diversity Is Defined

4 4 Diversity Progression Matrix (Army Version) Broad Requirements-based Understand/value differences in ethnicity, gender, culture, language, country of origin, faith, generation, etc. Inclusive culture Narrow Discriminated Groups Traditional Categories Diversity Definition Affirmative Action Diversity Inclusion EEO & EO TIME External Law Societal Pressure Internal Readiness Imperatives Competitive Labor Markets Mission Execution Diversity Drivers Source: Defense Business Board Report 03/01/04 (Modified for Army applications) DRIVERS Recruiting Development Training Mentorship Retention Leadership Cultural Skills Teamwork Innovation Performance Equal access Eliminate discrimination Eliminate effects of the past Target underrepresented Organization focus Understand differences High performance Inclusive culture Diversity & Leadership Directorate, ASA(M&RA)

5 5 EVOLVING DEMOGRAPHICS EVOLVING DEMOGRAPHICS COMPETITIVE LABOR MARKET COMPETITIVE LABOR MARKET ATTRACTING DIVERSE TALENT ATTRACTING DIVERSE TALENT YOUTH EDUCATION YOUTH EDUCATION PHYSICAL FITNESS PHYSICAL FITNESS NATIONAL EXPECTATIONS NATIONAL EXPECTATIONS MISSION READINESS HUMAN DIMENSION OF LEADERSHIP HUMAN DIMENSION OF LEADERSHIP INCLUSIVE ENVIRONMENT INCLUSIVE ENVIRONMENT HIGH PERFORMANCE HIGH PERFORMANCE MANAGED TALENT MANAGED TALENT HUMAN RELATIONS HUMAN RELATIONS PERSONNEL READINESS NATIONAL IMPLICATIONS GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT INEVITABILITY: Recruiting Talent = Recruiting Diversity Why Diversity Matters HUMAN DIMENSION OF CONFLICT HUMAN DIMENSION OF CONFLICT CULTURALLY ASTUTE FORCE CULTURALLY ASTUTE FORCE AGILE & ADAPTIVE LEADERS AGILE & ADAPTIVE LEADERS FUTURE OPERATING ENVIRONMENT FUTURE OPERATING ENVIRONMENT DRIVERSLINK TO MISSION Recruiting Development Training Mentorship Retention Leadership Cultural Skills Teamwork Innovation Performance Mission Execution Talent Management

6 6 Diversity and High Performance A high performance organization is one that leverages the total capacity of all of its people. CAPACITY Attract Recruit Assign Mentor Develop Train/Educate Retain PERFORMANCE Understand Value Include Empower Inspire Reward Lead Talent Management Inclusive EnvironmentTraining & Education Leader Commitment DOTMLPF-R ORGANIZATIONAL CAPABILITY ENDSENDS WAYSWAYS MEANSMEANS FACTORS: Individual Capacity — Individual Performance — Organizational Capability — Inclusive Leadership Inclusive Leadership The Business of Diversity, Innovations International, Inc. Resources

7 7 Army Diversity Vision The national leader in embracing the strengths of diverse people in an inclusive environment...investing in and managing talent, valuing individuals, and developing culturally astute Soldiers and Civilians who enhance our communities and are prepared for the human dimension of leadership and global engagements. Army Diversity Vision The national leader in embracing the strengths of diverse people in an inclusive environment...investing in and managing talent, valuing individuals, and developing culturally astute Soldiers and Civilians who enhance our communities and are prepared for the human dimension of leadership and global engagements. L L D D R R S S H H I I P P Where We Are Going

8 8 How We Get There Ensure leader commitment to diversity and inclusion practices at all levels of the Army Institutionalize talent management processes that identify, recruit, develop, and retain Soldiers and Civilians from diverse backgrounds Establish and resource a structure to support the Army Diversity Roadmap Implement diversity training & education programs that develop socio-cultural competencies to meet the demands of the 21 st -century expeditionary force Create and maintain an inclusive environment where the value of diverse knowledge, experiences and backgrounds enhances mission readiness Goal 1 Goal 2 Goal 3 Goal 4 Goal 5 Leadership People Structure Training & Education Environment Leader Commitment High Quality Diverse Talent Integrated Diversity and Leader Development Enhanced Cultural Competency Expanded Human Dimension of Leadership Skills Army Wide Inclusive Culture GoalsStrategic OutcomesFocus Position the all volunteer Army for success in the 21 st century— given our global engagements, demographic shift in population and competing demands for high quality talent from diverse backgrounds.

9 9 Additional Charts

10 Number of People Men of Western European Descent Women Western European Descent All Other Cultures U.S. Workstyle Cultural Orientation Workstyle Characteristics Task Orientation Source: Innovations International, Army SEDAT September 2010 (modified) Relationship Orientation Band of Inclusion Band of Inclusion Expansion Results of Diversity Education

11 11 Comparison of Diversity, EEO, & EO EO EEO Organizational Performance Focus Leader Accountability Diversity Training & Education Inclusive Environment Institutionalized Talent Management Measurement & Assessment All Soldiers & Civilians Training Outreach Reporting 5 Protected Categories MILITARYCIVILIAN Statutory MD715 Compliance Civilian Complaints (Statute) Special Emphasis (Minority College Relations Program) Regulatory AR Military Complaints (Policy) 9 Protected Categories Observances Common to 3 Programs Climate Assessment Common to EO & Diversity Protected EO Categories Race Ethnicity Gender National Origin Religion Protected EEO Categories Race Color Gender National Origin Religion Disability Age Reprisal Genetics IMPLIED Policy Resourcing

12 12 HS Graduation Rates The High School Graduation Challenge Obesity trends among American youth are high (approximately 3 of 10) Education shortcomings (math, science, technology, foreign language) are being addressed but no near term national solution Approximately 7 of 10 young males, ages 18-24, fail to meet military qualification standards (physical, moral, mental, intellectual) 70% of youth in poverty will not graduate 50 % of minorities will not graduate 30% overall will not graduate Females are outperforming males Inner city graduation rates fall as low as 24% High school dropouts are overrepresented among the incarcerated

13 13 Attributes, Experiences, & Backgrounds Personality Cultural Factors Language Race Ethnicity National/Regional Origin Religion Other Cultural Aspects Personality Type Learning Style Thinking Style Comprehension Speed Communication Style Employment Seniority/Rank Organization/Component Career Field/Specialty Work Experience Educational Background Civilian/Military Status Income/Economic Status Employment Status Geographic Location Personal Age Gender Physical Ability Sexual Orientation Physical Appearance Family & Preference Recreational Habits Personal Habits Political Orientation Marital Status Parental Status Family Status Acknowledge Differences Understand Differences Value Differences Role Models ATTRIBUTES EXPERIENCES & BACKGROUNDS Silent (1925 – 1946) Baby Boomers (1946 – 1964) Generation X (1965 – 1980) Generation Y (1981 – 2001) Generation Z (2002 – ) Developmental Stages Generational Factors* * Birth year in parenthesis

14 14 ACKNOWLEDGE DIFFERENCES (Accept the Notion That Differences Matter) UNDERSTAND DIFFERENCES VALUE DIFFERENCES ROLE MODELS Assessment A Process Approach To Inclusion Inclusive Environment: An environment that welcomes the full engagement of all Soldiers and Army Civilians—embracing the strength of differences, fostering a sense of belonging, and supporting high performance through inspired contributions from each member of our diverse Army.

15 15 ARMY OFFICER DEMOGRAPHICS & U.S. POPULATION Source: U.S. Census and DMDC, 2008 PercentagePercentage

16 16 Source: U.S. Census and DMDC, 2008 PercentagePercentage ARMY ENLISTED DEMOGRAPHICS & U.S. POPULATION

17 17 Sources: 1. DMDC, 2008 PercentagePercentage 2. U.S. Department of Commerce, Census Bureau, Population Estimates, retrieved August 12, 2008, from ARMY OFFICER DEMOGRAPHICS & U.S. 18 – 24 YEAR OLD POPULATION

18 18 Sources: 1. DMDC, 2008 PercentagePercentage 2. U.S. Department of Commerce, Census Bureau, Population Estimates, retrieved August 12, 2008, from ARMY ENLISTED DEMOGRAPHICS & U.S. 18 – 24 YEAR OLD POPULATION

19 19 Communication Style Comprehension Speed Thinking Style Learning Style Personality Type Functional Level/ Classification Geographic Location Age Work Location/Duty Station Seniority/Rank Division/ Dept./ Unit/ Group Career Field or Specialty Union Affiliation Management Status Marital & Parental Status Family Status Appearance Educational Background Work Experience National Origin Income Personal Habits Religion Recreational Habits Ethnicity First Language Sexual Orientation Gender Physical Ability Race FOURLAYERSOFDIVERSITY SOURCE: Taken from L. Gardenswartz and A. Rowe, Diversity Teams at Work: Capitalizing on the Power of Diversity (2003). Some terms modified for Army Application. “This is important—not to advantage anyone, but to cause a better understanding of everyone.” -GEN Ward, 1 Apr 08 Attributes, Experiences, & Backgrounds

20 Diversity-Related Milestones 1978 Workforce 2000 (Hudson Institute) 1987 Regents of the University of California v. Bakke (University of CA-Davis) 2008 First State Chief Diversity Officer (PA) 2042 Projected Transition To Racial Plurality 1977 “Diversity” Used In Reference to Workforce Demographics (Pope & Associates) 2003Grutter v. Bollinger (University of Michigan) DiversityInc Founded1998 Initial DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity 2001 Workforce 2020 (Hudson Institute) 1997 Employee Resource Groups Expanded (Affinity Groups)1990s Diversity Metrics/Score Card Emphasis (Accountability) 2000s 2005Diversity Management Study (GAO) “Valuing Diversity” Terminology Used (Lewis Griggs)1980s


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