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Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 MODULE 4: TIERED INSTRUCTION Adolescent Literacy – Professional Development Unit 2, Session 3.

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Presentation on theme: "Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 MODULE 4: TIERED INSTRUCTION Adolescent Literacy – Professional Development Unit 2, Session 3."— Presentation transcript:

1 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 MODULE 4: TIERED INSTRUCTION Adolescent Literacy – Professional Development Unit 2, Session 3

2 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 THE ROLE OF THE CLASSROOM TEACHER IN TI 4.2.3

3 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Session Overview  Unit 2, Session 3 Questions:  What do classroom teachers need to consider as they incorporate literacy instruction into a curriculum?  How will classroom teachers be supported as they implement literacy interventions?  Unit 2, Session 3 Objectives:  Understand the changing role of the classroom teacher in implementing TI  Consider literacy skills that can be best reinforced through specific content area work 3

4 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Warm-Up: Content Area Focus  Consider the literacy skills required for three reading-based assignments you use in class.  Rank the reading skills that your subject area lends itself toward more naturally  1 = Easiest to teach in your subject  4 = Hardest to teach in your subject 4

5 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 TI Roles 5

6 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Elements of Literacy 6

7 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Content Area Responsibilities  Explicitly instruct students in reading skills  Ensure student comprehension of subject area texts  Differentiate approach based on individual student needs 7

8 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Review the Reading  Use the “Four A’s” protocol to discuss the most important points in the NASP (2006) reading. 8

9 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Goals of Literacy Training 9

10 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Skills  Each text requires direct instruction in  Decoding: Can students pronounce unfamiliar words and read fluently?  Comprehension: Do students understand what they have read?  Vocabulary: How do students approach comprehension of unfamiliar subject area words? 10

11 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Strategies  What tactics do students need to employ to demonstrate knowledge of skills?  Which strategies come naturally?  Which strategies do teachers need to explicitly teach? 11

12 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Examples of Strategies  Note taking  Highlighting  Margin notes  Summarizing (oral or written) 12

13 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Resources  Knowledge of specific literacy programs  Application of literacy resources to supplement classroom instruction 13

14 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Application to Curriculum  Thinking like a scientist, historian, fiction writer, etc.  Literacy skills & strategies required for success in various subject areas may differ 14

15 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Cross-Curricular Consistency Literacy intervention is most effective when a student applies the same skill in different subjects.  Example: All teachers use the same structure and method for reading notes.  Example: All teachers use the same cuing structure to find main idea in a passage. 15

16 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Changing Classroom Teacher Role  Content knowledge transference becomes…  Focus on literacy skills for independent access of content  Reading assignments that each have an explicit purpose  Direct teaching of skills & strategies to ensure reading comprehension 16

17 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 Wrap-Up  Things to Remember:  Subject areas teachers are the primary literacy instructors in TI.  Skills and strategies must be taught explicitly using literacy resources in collaboration with curriculum texts.  Support for the changing role of the classroom teacher in TI is essential to the success of interventions. 17

18 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 For Next Time  Choose the literacy element that can be most easily taught in your class.  Read the corresponding pages in Boardman, A. G.et al. (2008).  Take note of five suggestions or key pieces of information about teaching towards mastery in this element. 18

19 Module 4: Unit 2, Session 3 References Boardman, A. G., Roberts, G., Vaughn, S., Wexler, J., Murray, C. S., & Kosanovich, M. (2008). Effective instruction for adolescent struggling readers: A practice brief. Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research Corporation, Center on Instruction. Bryant, D, & Barrera, M. (2008). Changing roles for educators within the framework of response-to- intervention. Intervention in School and Clinic, 45(72), Retrieved from doi: / Johnson, E.S., & Smith, L. (2008). Implementation of response to intervention at middle school: Challenges and potential benefits. Teaching Exceptional Children, 46  52. Kamil, M. L., Borman, G. D., Dole, J., Kral, C. C., Salinger, T., and Torgesen, J. (2008). Improving adolescent literacy: Effective classroom and intervention practices: A Practice Guide (NCEE # ). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved from NASP. (2006). New roles in response to intervention: Creating success for schools and children. Retrieved from 19


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