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Author: Joanna Halpert Krasua Genre: Drama Big Question: How do we create opportunities for our dreams to come true?

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Presentation on theme: "Author: Joanna Halpert Krasua Genre: Drama Big Question: How do we create opportunities for our dreams to come true?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Author: Joanna Halpert Krasua Genre: Drama Big Question: How do we create opportunities for our dreams to come true?

2 Small Group Small Group Timer Timer

3 Review Games Story Sort Story Sort VocabularyWords Vocabulary Words: Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words

4 Spelling Words Spelling Words Homophones

5 heel heal symbol cymbal herd heard patients patience capitol capital straight strait aisle isle stationery stationary sheer shear bread bred martial marshall discreet discrete adolescents adolescence

6 Big Question: How do we create opportunities for our dreams to come true? Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

7 Vocabulary Words absurd behalf candidate dean delirious diploma hovers obedient reject attired enrollment malnourished fateful suffrage victory Vocabulary Words More Words to Know

8 Monday Question of the Day How do we create opportunities for our dreams to come true?

9 Today we will learn about: Build Concepts Draw Conclusions Text Structure Build Background Vocabulary Fluency: Stress/Emphasis/Expression Grammar: Prepositions Spelling: Homophones Life Obstacles

10 Fluency Model Stress/Emphasis

11 Fluency: Stress/Emphasis Listen as I read “Elizabeth Cady Stanton.” As I read, notice how I model reading with expression by placing emphasis on important words. Be ready to answer questions after I finish.

12 Fluency: Stress/Emphasis Why was the 15 th Amendment a mixed victory for Elizabeth Cady Stanton and other women rights leaders? What conclusions can you draw about the movement to gain women suffrage?

13 Concept Vocabulary fateful – determining what is to happen suffrage – the right to vote victory – success in a contest (next slide)

14 Concept Vocabulary (To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new information, and save your changes.)

15 Build Concept Vocabulary Build Concept Vocabulary fateful, suffrage, victory Actions Events Goals Life Obstacles

16 Draw Conclusions, Text Structure Turn to page

17 Prior Knowledge Prior Knowledge What do you know about women’s rights long ago? Restrictions on Women’s Rights Long Ago

18 Prior Knowledge This week’s audio explores the requirements for becoming a doctor today. After we listen, we will discuss what you found out and what surprised you the most about what it takes to become a doctor.

19 Vocabulary Words

20 absurd – plainly not true; ridiculous behalf – side, interest, or favor candidate – person who seeks some position dean – head of a division or school in a college or university delirious – wildly excited

21 Vocabulary Words diploma – a printed paper given by a school, which states that someone has graduated from a certain course of study diploma hovers – waits nearby obedient – doing what you are told reject – to refuse to take; to turn down

22 More Words to Know attired – dressed enrollment – number who are members, who are registered malnourished – improperly nourishedmalnourished ( Next Slide ) ( Next Slide )

23 diploma

24 malnourished

25 Grammar Prepositions

26 womans in the medical field look upon her as a cymbal Women in the medical field look upon her as a symbol. elizabeth and anna is going to lay down and rest Elizabeth and Anna are going to lie down and rest.

27 Prepositions You’ve been in bed for three weeks. In bed and for three weeks are prepositional phrases. In and for are prepositions, and bed and weeks are objects of the prepositions. The preposition shows the relationship of the object of the preposition to other words in the sentence.

28 Prepositions The ambulance raced to the hospital. Prepositional Phrase: to the hospital Preposition: to Object of the Preposition: hospital

29 Prepositions Here are some prepositions: about above across after against along among around as at before behind below beneath besidebetween beyond by down during except for from in inside into near of off on onto out outside over past since through throughout to toward under underneath until up upon with within without

30 Prepositions Like an adjective, a prepositional phrase can modify a noun or pronoun. The girl in the red hat is my sister. Like an adverb, a prepositional phrase can modify a verb. Elizabeth walked into the classroom.

31 Prepositions Prepositions Underline the preposition once and the object of the preposition twice. My friend works at a college in Philadelphia. The student council president dismissed the meeting before lunch.

32 Prepositions Prepositions Underline the preposition once and the object of the preposition twice. Can you help me get through medical school? Liz felt discouraged about her progress in her career.

33 Prepositions Prepositions Underline the preposition once and the object of the preposition twice. The medical profession was not ready for a female surgeon. Elizabeth slept briefly between classes..

34 Prepositions Prepositions Underline the preposition once and the object of the preposition twice. She worked as a student nurse in the maternity ward.

35 Prepositions Prepositions Find the prepositional phrase in each sentence. Tell if it acts as an adjective or and adverb. The nurse hurried toward the patient. toward the patient – adverb The narrators stood on the stage. on the stage – adverb The boy with the broken leg needed surgery. with the broken leg - adjective

36 Prepositions Prepositions Find the prepositional phrase in each sentence. Tell if it acts as an adjective or and adverb. Nurse Abby ran down the muddy street. down the muddy street – adverb Everyone in the auditorium applauded the dean’s speech. in the auditorium - adjective

37 Spelling Words Spelling Words Homophones

38 heel heal symbol cymbal herd heard patients patience capitol capital straight strait aisle isle stationery stationary sheer shear bread bred martial marshall discreet discrete adolescents adolescence

39 Tuesday Question of the Day What attitudes toward women did men in the mid-1800s display?

40 Today we will learn about: Word Structure: Antonyms Draw Conclusions Structure Context Clues Fluency: Echo Reading Grammar: Prepositions Time for Science: Hippocratic Oath Life Obstacles

41 Vocabulary Strategy: Antonyms Pages

42 Elizabeth Blackwell: Medical Pioneer Pages

43 Fluency Echo Reading

44 Fluency: Echo Reading Turn to page 380, first half. As I read, notice how I stress certain words to express meaning. We will practice as a class doing three echo readings of the first half of page 380.

45 Grammar Prepositions

46 the graduate’s glided down the isle in their robes The graduates glided down the aisle in their robes. the year was 1847 and no woman had gone to medical school The year was 1847, and no woman had gone to medical school.

47 Prepositions A preposition shows a relationship between a noun or pronoun and another word in the sentence. A prepositional phrase begins with a preposition and usually ends with a noun or pronoun. The noun or pronoun in a prepositional phrase is called the object of the preposition.

48 Prepositions Here are some prepositions: about above across after against along among around as at before behind below beneath besidebetween beyond by down during except for from in inside into near of off on onto out outside over past since through throughout to toward under underneath until up upon with within without

49 Spelling Words Spelling Words Homophones

50 heel heal symbol cymbal herd heard patients patience capitol capital straight strait aisle isle stationery stationary sheer shear bread bred martial marshall discreet discrete adolescents adolescence

51 Wednesday Question of the Day In what ways were Elizabeth Blackwell’s medical ideas ahead of her times?

52 Today we will learn about: Draw Conclusions Text Structure Context Clues Sequence Vocabulary Fluency: Model Stress/Emphasis/Expression Grammar: Prepositions Spelling: Homophones Time for Science: Understanding Infections Vaccines Life Obstacles

53 Elizabeth Blackwell: Medical Pioneer Pages

54 Fluency Stress/Emphasis

55 Fluency: Stress/Emphasis Turn to page 381, Elizabeth’s monologue at the bottom and the top of 382. As I read, notice how I emphasis particular words. Now we will practice together as a class by doing three echo readings.

56 Grammar Prepositions

57 dr lin leaved the pills in the medicine cabinet Dr. Lin left the pills in the medicine cabinet. the nurse was tired but she tended to her patience The nurse was tired, but she tended to her patients.

58 Prepositions A preposition shows a relationship between a noun or pronoun and another word in the sentence. A prepositional phrase begins with a preposition and usually ends with a noun or pronoun. The noun or pronoun in a prepositional phrase is called the object of the preposition.

59 Prepositions Here are some prepositions: about above across after against along among around as at before behind below beneath besidebetween beyond by down during except for from in inside into near of off on onto out outside over past since through throughout to toward under underneath until up upon with within without

60 Prepositions A prepositional phrase can modify a noun, a pronoun, or a verb. As Noun Modifier: The doctor with dark hair is Dr. Klein. (Prepositional phrase modifies noun doctor.) As Verb Modifier: He walks with a slight limp. (Prepositional phrase modifies verb walks.)

61 Prepositions Review something you have written and add prepositional phrases that elaborate on nouns and verbs.

62 Spelling Words Spelling Words Homophones

63 heel heal symbol cymbal herd heard patients patience capitol capital straight strait aisle isle stationery stationary sheer shear bread bred martial marshall discreet discrete adolescents adolescence

64 Thursday Question of the Day How is pursing a special purpose in life different from pursuing a career? How is it similar?

65 Today we will learn about: Biography/Text Features Reading Across Texts Content-Area Vocabulary Fluency: Partner Reading Grammar: Prepositions Spelling: Homophones Science: Research Careers

66 “Rebecca Lee Crumpler” Pages

67 Fluency Partner Reading

68 Fluency: Partner Reading Turn to page 381, bottom and top of 382. Read these paragraphs three times with a partner. Be sure to read with expression by stressing important words, and offer each other feedback.

69 Grammar Prepositions

70 the stationary was embossed with the hospitals seal The stationery was embossed with the hospital’s seal. they did’nt know that the applicant is a woman They didn’t know that the applicant is a woman.

71 Prepositions A preposition shows a relationship between a noun or pronoun and another word in the sentence. A prepositional phrase begins with a preposition and usually ends with a noun or pronoun. The noun or pronoun in a prepositional phrase is called the object of the preposition.

72 Prepositions Here are some prepositions: about above across after against along among around as at before behind below beneath besidebetween beyond by down during except for from in inside into near of off on onto out outside over past since through throughout to toward under underneath until up upon with within without

73 Prepositions Test Tip: The word to is often, but not always, a preposition. If to is followed by a verb, it is not a preposition. As Preposition: She will go to medical school. (to followed by noun) As Part of Verb: She will have to study hard. (to followed by verb)

74 Spelling Words Spelling Words Homophones

75 heel heal symbol cymbal herd heard patients patience capitol capital straight strait aisle isle stationery stationary sheer shear bread bred martial marshall discreet discrete adolescents adolescence

76 Friday Question of the Day How do we create opportunities for our dreams to come true?

77 Today we will learn about: Build Concept Vocabulary Draw Conclusions Foreshadowing Context Clues Grammar: Prepositions Spelling: Homophones Print Sources/Media Life Obstacles

78 Draw Conclusions Logical conclusions are based on details or facts in a piece of writing and on what readers know about real life. A logical conclusion you might draw about Elizabeth Blackwell based on your reading, is “Elizabeth Blackwell had a lot of courage.” Be careful not to draw illogical conclusions.

79 Foreshadowing Foreshadowing consists of hints or clues about what will happen later in a story. It can either create suspense or make a story more predictable and so create a sense of order.

80 Antonyms Sometimes an antonym—a word that means the opposite—can provide a clue to the meaning of an unfamiliar word in a passage. Identify an antonym for each word in the chart. Then write sentences using each word and its antonym.

81 Antonyms

82 Print Sources/Media Would you use an encyclopedia or a computer to conduct research on preventive medicine? Both sources would be useful.

83 Print Sources/Media Print sources include almanacs, dictionaries, encyclopedias, magazines, newspapers, and other reference books such as the Readers’ Guide to Periodical Literature.

84 Print Sources/Media Media consists of two main types: computer and non-computer. Computer sources include CD- ROMs, the Internet, and software. Non-computer sources include audiotapes, CDs, DVDs, films, and videotapes.

85 Grammar Prepositions

86 my Uncle had surgery on his heal My uncle had surgery on his heel. dr adair had performed many surgerys Dr. Adair had performed many surgeries.

87 Prepositions A preposition shows a relationship between a noun or pronoun and another word in the sentence. A prepositional phrase begins with a preposition and usually ends with a noun or pronoun. The noun or pronoun in a prepositional phrase is called the object of the preposition.

88 Prepositions Here are some prepositions: about above across after against along among around as at before behind below beneath besidebetween beyond by down during except for from in inside into near of off on onto out outside over past since through throughout to toward under underneath until up upon with within without

89 Spelling Words Spelling Words Homophones

90 heel heal symbol cymbal herd heard patients patience capitol capital straight strait aisle isle stationery stationary sheer shear bread bred martial marshall discreet discrete adolescents adolescence

91 Story test Classroom webpage, Reading Test AR Other Reading Quizzes Quiz #


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