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Tie Rod Case Study 4A-1. 4A-2 4A-3 4A-4 4A-5 4A-6.

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Presentation on theme: "Tie Rod Case Study 4A-1. 4A-2 4A-3 4A-4 4A-5 4A-6."— Presentation transcript:

1 Tie Rod Case Study 4A-1

2 4A-2

3 4A-3

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10 4A-10

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13 Water Handling Operations Unit 4A – Water and Hose Hydraulics 4A-13

14 Objectives Identify the elements that should be considered when calculating pump discharge pressure. Perform friction loss calculations using Principles of Hydraulics – Rules of Thumb and friction loss calculators. Identify ways to reduce friction loss. 4A-14

15 Objectives Discuss how hydraulics affect drafting procedures used to refill an engine. Describe the effects of ejector use during pumping operations. 4A-15

16 Pump Discharge Pressure (PDP) Pump discharge pressure is the amount of pressure in pounds per square inch (PSI) as measured at the pump discharge. 4A-16

17 4A-17 Friction Loss - (F) Friction loss is pressure loss caused by the turbulent movement of water or solution against the interior surface of fire hose, pipe, or fittings Normally measured in pressure loss (in PSI) per length of hose or pipe

18 Appliances - (A) Appliances are items (gated wyes, in-line tees, and check valves) that connect or interconnect the hose and pump together to form a hose lay. Appliances have an insignificant effect on friction loss calculations at flows used in wildland suppression and have been omitted from calculations in this lesson. 4A-18

19 4A-19 Elevation/Head Pressure - (E) Elevation/head pressure is the weight of a given height (depth) of water column at its base. Also known as lift, back pressure, gravity loss or gain Measured in terms of feet of water  One foot of water exerts a pressure of.5 PSI at the base of a column of water.

20 4A-20 Nozzle/Working Pressure - (N) Nozzle/working pressure is pressure that must be delivered to the nozzle to produce an effective stream. Optimum operating pressures:  Straight stream and Forester nozzles is 50 PSI  Variable pattern or fog nozzle is 100 PSI

21 Friction Loss Calculations 4A-21

22 Why do we need to perform friction loss calculations? Engine operators are more efficient and safe in their duties when they know the capabilities and limitations of their equipment. 4A-22

23 4A-23 References and Tools for Making Calculations Wildland Fire Hose Guide Water Handling Equipment Guide Incident Response Pocket Guide Fire stream/friction loss calculator Principles of Hydraulics—Rules of Thumb

24 “Rule of Thumb” A rule based on experience or practice rather than on scientific knowledge. Any method of estimating that is practical though not precise. 4A-24

25 4A-25 Friction Loss Formula Pump Discharge Pressure (PDP) = F +/- E + N = F riction Loss +/- E levation (Head Pressure) + N ozzle Pressure

26 Considerations ENOPs must know the gallons per minute (GPM) that each nozzle will discharge. For simple hose lays, always start at the nozzle and work towards the pump. For progressive hose lays, always start from the most distant nozzle and work towards the pump. Always pump to the highest pump discharge pressure required. Gate down any laterals that require substantially less pressure. 4A-26

27 Friction Loss Calculation Exercises (Pre-course Work) 4A-27

28 Exercise 1 Pre-course Work 4A-28 You are pumping a 1½” hose lay 500’ long with a 5/16” tip. What is the GPM? What is the PDP? 5 friction loss in 500’ (1 PSI/100’) of 1½” hose flowing 20 GPM 0 no elevation change 50 straight stream tip 55 PSI +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= 20 GPM

29 4A-29 +F= +/-E= + N= PDP= You are pumping 600’ of 1½” hose 50’ above the pump with a ⅜” tip. What is the GPM? What is the PDP? 18 friction loss in 600’ (3 PSI/100’) of 1½” hose flowing at 30 GPM +25 head pressure for 50’ of elevation gain (50 ÷ 2) 50 straight stream tip 93 PSI 30 GPM Exercise 2 Pre-course Work Exercise 2 Pre-course Work

30 4A-30 You are pumping 300’ of 1½” hose through a wye to 2 sections of 1” hose, each 100’ long with ¼” tips (remember tips are 50 PSI). What are the GPMs? What is the PDP? 3friction loss in 100’ of 1” hose flowing 13 GPM 6friction loss in 300’ (2 PSI/100’) of 1½” hose flowing 26 GPM 0no elevation change 50straight stream tip 59PSI +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= 13 GPM Exercise 3 Pre-course Work Pre-course Work Exercise 3 Pre-course Work Pre-course Work 26 GPM

31 4A-31 You are pumping to a hose lay with the first lateral at 1,500’. You have another 100’ of 1½” hose to another lateral. Both laterals have ⅜” tips. What are the GPMs? What is the PDP? +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= 14friction loss in 100’ of 1” hose flowing 30 GPM 3friction loss in 100’ of 1½” hose flowing 30 GPM 135friction loss in 1,500’ (9 PSI/100’) of 1½” hose flowing 60 GPM 0no elevation change 50straight stream tip 202 PSI 30 GPM Exercise 4 Pre-course Work 60 GPM

32 4A-32 Friction Loss Calculation Exercises (In-class)

33 4A-33 You have 600’ of 1½” parallel hose to a Siamese valve. Attached to the wye is 100’ of 1½-inch hose to another wye and the first lateral, another 200’ of 1½” hose to the second lateral, and another 100’ of 1½” hose to last lateral. Each lateral is 100’ of 1” hose with a variable flow nozzle flowing 30 GPM. Consider this flat ground. What are the GPMs? What is the PDP? 14friction loss in 100’ of 1” hose flowing 30 GPM 3friction loss in 100’ if 1½’’ hose flowing 30 GPM 18friction loss in 200’ (9 PSI/100’) of 1½” hose flowing 60 GPM 20friction loss in 100’ of 1½” hose flowing 90 GPM 30friction loss in 600’ (5 PSI/100’) of 1½” hose with 2 Siamesed lines 0no elevation change 100variable flow nozzle 185 PSI +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= Exercise 5 In-class Exercise 5 In-class 90 GPM60 GPM

34 4A-34 +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= You have 400’ of 1½” parallel hose to a Siamese valve. Attached to the Siamese is 100’ of 1½” hose to a wye and the first lateral, another 200’ of 1½” hose to the second lateral. Each lateral is 100’ of 1” hose with a variable flow nozzle flowing 30 GPM. There is a 60’ rise in elevation. What are the GPMs? What is the PDP? 14friction loss per 100’ of 1” hose flowing 30 GPM 6friction loss for 200’ (3 PSI/100’) of 1½” hose flowing 30 GPM 9friction loss in 100’ of 1½” hose flowing 60 GPM 12friction loss in 400’ (3 PSI/100’) of 1½” flowing 60 GPM with 2 Siamesed lines +30head pressure for 60’ of elevation gain (60 ÷ 2) 100variable flow nozzle 171PSI Exercise 6 In-class Exercise 6 In-class 60 GPM

35 4A-35 10friction loss in 100’ of 1” hose flowing 25 GPM 2friction loss in 100’ of 1½” hose flowing 25 GPM 18friction loss in 300’ (6 PSI/100’) of 1½” hose flowing 50 GPM 10friction loss in 500’ (2 PSI/100’) of 1½” flowing 50 GPM with 2 Siamesed lines -10head pressure for 20’ of elevation loss (20 ÷ 2) 100fog nozzle 130PSI You have 500’ of 1½” parallel hose to a Siamese valve with a 30’ drop in elevation. Attached to the Siamese valve is 300’ of 1½” hose to a wye and the first lateral has a gain of 10’ in elevation. There is another 100’ of 1½” hose to the second and last lateral. Each lateral is 100’ of 1” hose with a variable flow nozzle flowing 25 GPM. What is the PDP? +F= +/-E +N= PDP= Exercise 7 In-class Exercise 7 In-class 50 GPM

36 4A-36 Friction Loss Calculations (“Rules of Thumb” and IRPG)

37 4A-37 You are pumping a 1½” hose lay 500’ long with a 5/16” tip. What is the GPM? What is the PDP? 20 GPM +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= Cheat Sheet 25 5 PSI/100’ x 5 appx 20 GPM, 1 PSI/100’ x 5 +F= +/_E= +N= PDP= 0 no change 50 smooth bore tip 75 PSI 55 PSI IRPG Exercise 1 “Rules of Thumb” Exercise 1 “Rules of Thumb”

38 4A-38 You are pumping 600’ of 1½” hose 50’ above the pump with a 3/8” tip. What is the GPM? What is the PDP? 30 GPM +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= Cheat Sheet 30 5 PSI/100’ x appx 30 GPM, 3 PSI/100’ x 6 +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= ’ gain 50 smooth bore tip 105 PSI 93 PSI IRPG Exercise 2 “Rules of Thumb” Exercise 2 “Rules of Thumb”

39 4A-39 You are pumping 300’ of 1½” hose through a wye to 2 sections of 1” hose, each 100’ long with ¼” tips (remember tips are 50 PSI). What are the GPMs? What is the PDP? +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= 15 GPM Cheat Sheet PSI/100’ x appx 15 GPM x 1 +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= 15 5 PSI/100’ x 3 appx 30 GPM, 3 PSI/100’ x 3 0 no change 50 smooth bore tip 75 PSI 63 PSI IRPG Exercise 3 “Rules of Thumb” Exercise 3 “Rules of Thumb” 30 GPM

40 4A-40 You are pumping to a hose lay with the first lateral at 1,500’. You have another 100’ of 1½” hose to another lateral. Both laterals have ⅜” tips. What are the GPMs? What is the PDP? 30 GPM +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= Cheat Sheet* PSI/100’ x 30 GPM x 1 +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= 5 5 PSI/100’ x 1 30 GPM, 3 PSI/100’ x 1 0 no change 50 smooth bore tip 215 PSI 218 PSI IRPG PSI/100’ x GPM, 10 PSI/100’ x 15 Exercise 4 “Rules of Thumb” Exercise 4 “Rules of Thumb” * At high flows greater than >60 GPM and hose lengths greater than 10 PSI/100’ friction loss for 1½” hose. 60 GPM

41 4A-41 You have 600’ of 1½” parallel hose to a Siamese valve. Attached to the wye is 100’ of 1½” hose to another wye and the first lateral, another 200’ of 1½” hose to the second lateral, and another 100’ of 1½” hose to last lateral. Each lateral is 100’ of 1” hose with a variable flow nozzle flowing 30 GPM. Consider this flat ground. What are the GPMs? What is the PDP? +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= PSI/100’ x 30 GPM x 1 +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= 5 5 PSI/100’ x 1 30 GPM, 3 PSI/100’ x 1 0 no change 100 variable/fog nozzle 175 PSI 188 PSI PSI/100’ x 2 60 GPM, 10 PSI/100’ x PSI/100’ x 6 90 GPM, 20 PSI/100’ x 6 ÷ 4 (Siamese) PSI/100’ x 1 90 GPM x 1 Cheat SheetIRPG Exercise 5 “Rules of Thumb” Exercise 5 “Rules of Thumb” 90 GPM 60 GPM

42 4A-42 You have 400’ of 1½” parallel hose to a Siamese valve. Attached to the Siamese valve is 100’ of 1½” hose to a wye and the first lateral, another 200’ of 1½” hose to the second lateral. Each lateral is 100’ of 1” hose with a variable flow nozzle flowing 30 GPM. There is a 60’ rise in elevation. What is the GPM? What is the PDP? +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= PSI/100’ x 30 GPM x 1 +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= 10 5 PSI/100’ x 2 30 GPM, 3 PSI/100’ x ’ gain 100 variable/fog nozzle 180 PSI 171 PSI PSI/100’ x 1 60 GPM, 10 PSI/100’ x PSI/100’ x 4 60 GPM, 10 PSI/100’ x 4 ÷ 4 (Siamese) Cheat SheetIRPG Exercise 6 “Rules of Thumb” Exercise 6 “Rules of Thumb” 60 GPM

43 4A-43 You have 500’ of 1½” parallel hose to a Siamese valve with a 30’ drop in elevation. Attached to the Siamese valve is 300’ of 1½” hose to a wye and the first lateral has a gain of 10’ in elevation. There is another 100’ of 1½” hose to the second and last lateral. Each lateral is 100’ of 1” hose with a variable flow nozzle flowing 25 GPM. What is the GPM? What is the PDP? +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= 10 10’ x 25 GPM x 1 +F= +/-E= +N= PDP= 5 5 PSI/100’ x 1 25 GPM, 2 PSI/100’ x 1  10 20’ total drop 100 variable/fog nozzle 145 PSI 136 PSI 15 5 PSI/100’ x 3 50 GPM, appx 8 PSI/100’ x PSI/100’ x 5 50 GPM, appx 8 PSI/100’ x 5 ÷ 4 (Siamese) Cheat SheetIRPG Exercise 7 “ Rules of Thumb” 50 GPM

44 4A-44 Why are there differences? Friction Loss Calculator –Derived from a mathematical equation “Rule of Thumb “ – An estimation

45 Are the differences significant enough...? The goal is to supply an adequate amount of water and pressure to the nozzle operator(s). Calculations for neither method is exact. Both methods provide a starting point to meet the goal. 4A-45 NO!NO!

46 4A-46 Friction Loss Calculator Use The calculator provides consistency and validation (the theory behind hydraulics). Field use may be slow and tedious.

47 4A-47 Reasons for using the Principles of Hydraulics—Rules of Thumb Based on theories. Provide quick solutions for fire situations. Make fast and practical decisions during hose lay construction.

48 4A-48 Reducing Friction Loss Reduce pump pressure. Reduce the nozzle tip size. Lay parallel hose. –Calculate friction loss for one hose, then divide by 4. Eliminate unnecessary plumbing parts. Increase hose diameters where possible.

49 Pump Cavitation Pump cavitation occurs when more water is being discharged from the pump than is being supplied creating a low-pressure area within the center (or eye) of the pump. 4A-49

50 Effects of Cavitation When water enters the low pressure area at the eye of the impeller, water vaporizes or boils more easily. When vapor bubbles reach the pressure or discharge side of the pump, they implode or forcefully collapse resulting in an intense shock wave which creates dings and pits of the pump walls and impeller. –Damage is cumulative and progressive. Excessive cavitation will eventually lead to impeller failure. 4A-50

51 Signs of Cavitation Pump RPMs suddenly increase due to a lack of water resistance on the impeller Rattling or a sound like gravel is flowing through the pump Increase in pump RPMs without an increase in pump discharge pressure (PDP) 4A-51

52 Corrective Actions Increase the supply of water coming into the pump and/or decrease the volume from the pump. If the pump is not staffed, the low pressure shutoff switch must be in the down position. Clean out the suction strainer. Do not deadhead the pump for prolonged periods. –Ensure that water is circulating through the plumbing. 4A-52

53 4A-53 Drafting General Facts Atmospheric pressure is approximately 15 pounds per square inch (PSI) at sea level. –An excellent pump can pull water 24 feet at sea level. Atmospheric pressure decreases.5 PSI for each 1,000 foot increase in elevation. Each 1,000 foot increase in elevation results in a loss of 1 foot of draft power. Locating a pump as close to the water source as possible and reducing the vertical distance a pump must draft will increase its pumping ability.

54 4A-54 Drafting Using Engine Pump Setup 1.Locate a water source with adequate water supply. 2.Always obtain permission from the land owner before using a private water source. 3.Source site should allow for good ingress and egress. 4.Source site should free of floating debris. 5.All fittings and hoses on the suction side should be free of air leaks.

55 4A-55 Drafting Using Engine Pump Setup 6.The foot valve should be completely submerged, free of debris, and properly functioning. 7.Obtain a prime by using the hand/electric primer on the engine or fill the draft hose with water manually. 8.Set the water pressure shutdown switch to the up (override) position. Leave the switch in this position for the entire drafting process.

56 4A-56 Drafting Using Engine Pump Setup 9.Set correct valve configuration. Draft-to-tank Draft-to-fire 10.Confirm pump is drafting water into the tank.

57 4A-57 Ejector Use for Refill Operations General Information Ejectors increase water flow between %. Ejectors can lift water 80 feet or more vertically. Ejectors can move water 200 feet or more horizontally. Ensure you have enough water in the tank to fill all hose used on intake and return line.

58 4A-58 Working Principles

59 4A-59 Ejector Setup 1.Connect a section of 1-inch hose to overboard discharge and the water inlet side of the ejector. 2.Attach a strainer foot valve to ejector suction port of the ejector. 3.Attach a 1½-inch hose to the discharge side of ejector. 4.Submerge ejector in the water source.

60 4A-60 Ejector Setup 5.Start pump and throttle up to desired output. 6.Keep kinks out of supply and return lines. 7.If the site is going to be used multiple times, then leave hardware in place for refill operations.

61 4A-61 Objectives Identify the elements that should be considered when calculating pump pressure. Perform friction loss calculations using Principles of Hydraulics – Rules of Thumb and friction loss calculators. Identify ways to reduce friction loss. Discuss how hydraulics affect drafting procedures used to refill an engine. Describe the effects of ejector use during pump operations.


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