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MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module

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Presentation on theme: "MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module"— Presentation transcript:

1 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Teacher’s Guide to Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Welcome participants and introduce yourself and other key staff. If small enough group, have participants introduce themselves. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

2 Intended Accomplishments
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Intended Accomplishments Introductions MAP Basics Test Administration Demo of TestTaker Reports Communicating with Parents Other Resources Looking Ahead Optional Lab Practice Handout — Agenda Explain purpose and intended accomplishments to participants: The purpose of this workshop is to help you understand the MAP system and all of its uses. We will talk some about how this assessment is different than ones you may have used in the past. We will also spend time on the specifics of testing with this system – how to choose the correct test to give, roles of different individuals and spend a little time on the reports and beginning to use the data in your classrooms. Walk participants through the packet of materials so that they know what is available to them. Handout — Agenda © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

3 Key to Pictures You’ll See
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Key to Pictures You’ll See = discussion item = key point = a tool for your use Briefly cover what the different icons mean when they appear in the presentation. Also, tell them when they see a yellow box in the lower right hand corner that this refers to a handout in their packet. = something to think about © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

4 What questions do you want answered today?
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module What questions do you want answered today? What do you want to know about MAP assessments and the reports you will receive? How can this workshop meet the needs of your district? (CLICK) Think about what you feel you need to know about the MAP system. Please jot down any questions and refer to them as we go through the training. I want to make sure all of your questions get answered. Also think about how you can apply what you learn in this workshop to assist you with what is needed in your district. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

5 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
NWEA Partner Districts We partner with schools and districts to help all kids learn. British Columbia OR WA CA AZ ID NV MT WY CO NM TX MN NE IA AR IL WI MI IN PA SC RI VA OH KY KS NY UT TN GA NC ND NH ME Canada Taiwan NJ Why does NWEA exist? It is important to us to emphasize that the strength of our work is the “WE” in NWEA—networking, sharing, and learning from others around the country. This map represents more than a million kids from across the country who were part of our latest norming study.   AK LA Venezuela FLA © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

6 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Our Purpose Our purpose is to help all kids learn; more tomorrow than today, more next year than this year. Our purpose is growth and improvement of learning. Our purpose is growth and improvement of learning. We promote the instructional needs of every child and creating the most growth possible. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

7 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
NWEA Mission Partnering to help all kids learn NWEA’s Mission is “Partnering to help all kids learn” – the same as yours. What do we do? We help schools create a culture that uses data to make instructional decisions. We provide training and support. We conduct research to improve learning. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

8 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Quick Survey Have you attended a MAP Intro workshop? What do you already know about MAP? (CLICK) Gather a quick show of hands of those who have attended a MAP Intro workshop. Use this second question to lead into a discussion of what your audience already knows about MAP. Use the questions on the NEXT slide to supplement this discussion. This should give you an understanding of how deep or how brief you need to be throughout the next section (even though everyone needs a review), and how top-down the decision may have been. This just gives you a better perspective on your group. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

9 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Pre-Assessment How is MAP different from conventional assessments? What does the RIT scale measure? What are some of the features of the RIT scale? How does the MAP system know where to give a student the first question? How soon is data available after a student takes a MAP test? VERY IMPORTANT NOTE: The survey should give you an idea how much experience the group has had with NWEA. If they have a lot of experience, use the questions to check their level of understanding. If the group is very knowledgeable, just be brief through this section and give enough information to make sure the group is basically at the same starting place. It is sometimes helpful to use the group as “experts” to answer the questions and then you add whatever else is needed. If the group has little or no experience as a whole, this section should be covered more thoroughly. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

10 Assumptions of ‘Graded’ Schools
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Assumptions of ‘Graded’ Schools Curriculum scale Skills taught may begin with associating sounds with letters in K-1, to adult levels in high school Typically, we feel restricted to “covering” specific curricula related to adopted grade level standards Beginning Literacy Adult Reading 5th Grade We, as educators, start with a curriculum scale. In reading, for example, …children come to us knowing that letters have sound attached to them. We want them to leave us able to read college level materials. How do we do this? We assign curriculum that will be taught at each grade level. We can assume that most schools are “graded”. That is, students are divided into 13 grade level groups. Our curriculum is divided in accordance with these grade levels and is articulated upward by skills. Typically we feel restricted to “covering” specific curricula or the adopted grade level standards. Something for you to think about… (CLICK) Does this design meet the needs of all students? Does this design meet the needs of all students? © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

11 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
How does classroom reality relate to our assumptions? Beginning Literacy Adult Reading 5th Grade x We have students performing above, at, and below this ‘grade level’ curriculum How does this impact assessment and instruction? The profound challenge: The reality of these assumptions is that we know that a number of students will be performing above and below this “grade level” picture. We must ask ourselves how this grade level structure impacts how we assess and how we instruct all of our students. Think about this question… (CLICK) How do we foster growth for ALL students? How do we foster growth for all students? © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

12 Instructional Level vs. Mastery
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Instructional Level vs. Mastery The NWEA test provides the instructional level of the student. It provides a road map for students toward achieving mastery. It is not a test for determining mastery of skills. (CLICK) With NWEA assessments, our purpose is to get the most accurate information we can on every child, regardless of where they are in the curriculum. In order to do this, we had to design something different. A KEY POINT here is that this assessment provides teachers with the INSTRUCTIONAL LEVEL of the student. {Note to trainer – Throughout the workshop continue to emphasize that we are finding the instructional level; this is a concept new to most of the participants and one that needs constant review and emphasis.} (CLICK) It is based on a continuum of skills in math, reading, and language usage from low skill levels to high skill levels. We can consider it to be one long test, rather than a series of shorter tests that assess students over specific criteria at various grade levels. It provides a way—a road map–for determining where each student is performing in relation to local or state standards, curriculum, or other criteria. (CLICK) The NWEA assessment is not a “mastery” test. Teachers may ask questions about upper level math end-of-course tests. Explain that those tests may be considered mastery tests in that subject. With NWEA assessments, our purpose is to get the most accurate information we can on every child, regardless of where they are in the curriculum. In order to do this, we had to design something different. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

13 Features of the MAP Test
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Features of the MAP Test Challenging, appropriate and dynamically developed for every student Accurate data for students across the scale Untimed Purpose is internal accountability Measures growth in student achievement Immediate results Can test up to 4 times a year Some of the features of MAP: It provides a challenging test for every student. They are not expected to get every question right or every question wrong. It is dynamically built based on the achievement level of the student and will give accurate and reliable info for every student. It is an untimed test. Students should be given as much time as needed as long as they are making progress. We give this test for internal accountability, to be able to weigh ourselves against how we are doing. Even though external norms are provided, these are for a general reference. It measures growth in how students are progressing. Because we can see the data historically and it is consistent data from season to season, this allows the growth to be measured. We receive immediate results, right at the end of the test event. You can test a student up to 4 times a year in order to monitor their growth. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

14 Design & Features of the MAP Test
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Design & Features of the MAP Test Adult Reading MAP Test Measures of Academic Progress tests create an even more accurate and appropriate test for students because the test is built as a child takes it. Here is an example of a student who is fairly advanced, “Jonathan”, who is a 5th grader. When Jonathan sits down at the computer for the first time, the computer will select and display a typical 5th grade item. From here on out, the computer will select items specifically for Jonathan depending on how he performs on all of the previous items. (CLICK) If Jonathan gets the 1st item right, the computer will select a more difficult item from the next goal strand and displays it on the screen. (CLICK) Jonathan might get the 2nd item right also, so based on his two responses so far, the computer will display another more difficult item on the screen. (CLICK) Jonathan misses this one, so based on his 3 responses so far; the computer now selects an easier item. (CLICK) Each time Jonathan answers a question, the computer scores all the items taken so far to make a placement for the next item. (CLICK) The computer will continue to select questions, cycling through the goal strands, until Jonathan reaches the end of the test. (CLICK) The score is immediately available to the child and the teacher. Most of the NWEA tests range from items in length for a test that will report goal scores on the goal strands. - x - + x + + 215 x x x + 5th Grade x x x x x x x x x x Beginning Literacy © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

15 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
RIT (Rasch Unit) Scale 150 250 Beginning Literacy Adult Reading 5th Grade x MAP Test + - 215 Achievement scale Curriculum Scale Equal interval Shows Growth over time Consistent scale Attach a scale onto your pictures for a typical range. Explain how this is a curriculum and achievement scale. You can use the language that is appropriate to the audience – a curriculum scale when talking to teachers and an achievement scale when talking to parents. It is an equal interval scale, like a yardstick. This means that 10 RITs at the bottom means the same as 10 RITs at the top of the scale. The RIT Scale lets us see how much growth happened between fall and spring and across time. The scale is consistent – it has the same meaning regardless of the students’ grade level or items taken. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

16 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Checkpoint How is MAP different from conventional assessments? What does the RIT scale measure? What are some of the features of the RIT scale? How does the MAP system know where to give a student the first question? How soon is data available after a student takes a MAP test? Review the questions and answers with the group. (CLICK) Brings up each question. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

17 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Uses of MAP Intake testing Parent conferences Monitoring progress across time Course Placement Monitoring students in Special Programs Focusing and Differentiating Instruction Explain the Uses of MAP: Useful for intake testing of new students. Useful before parent conferences if you need a measure at that time. Useful for monitoring growth from fall to spring. Useful for interim testing in the winter to further monitor progress. Useful for assistance in placing students into certain courses, when used alongside other data. Useful for monitoring students in special programs such as Title I. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

18 How do I know which test to give?
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module How do I know which test to give? GOALS Survey 42-52 items ~ 1 hour to administer Gives information on goal areas Most commonly used fall and spring Survey 20 items ~30 minutes to administer NO INFORMATION on goal areas OVERALL RIT only Most commonly used for intake and winter testing Handbook — Page 3 Guidelines for Choosing the Correct Test Handout - Goal Structure Refer them to “Guidelines for Choosing the Correct Test.” Remind them that the general guidelines are to always give the students the shortest test that will serve the purpose for giving the test. You can use this chart for guidance on the appropriate test selection. One recommendation for districts who will be testing fall and spring and doing some monitoring in between these periods is to give the Goals Survey tests in the fall and spring and use the Survey tests (no goals) for any monitoring outside of the fall and spring windows. Handbook— Page 3 Guidelines for Choosing the Correct Test Handout - Goal Structure © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

19 Role of MAP Coordinator
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Role of MAP Coordinator Key point of contact Distributes all user names and passwords Receives all updates Coordinates the entire process New Class Roster File Handbook— Pages 4-7 Roles and Responsibilities Let’s review the roles of some of the key players in MAP testing: MAP Coordinator, Principals, Teachers, Proctors. We’ll start with the MAP Coordinator. They are the primary point of contact with NWEA They receive and distribute all user names and passwords (PPT Report) They receive all updates from NWEA They arrange the scheduling of classes in the labs, and coordinate the entire process They ensure a new Class Roster File is prepared and sent to NWEA EACH season Handbook— Pages 4-7 Roles and Responsibilities © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

20 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Principal Distributes user names and passwords Assists with scheduling Confirms teachers are in student data file Confirms teachers have copies of reports Meets with grade level teams on MAP data The principal will be the person in the school to hand out your user name and password so you can access your MAP teacher reports when testing is completed He/she will assist with scheduling the lab He/she will make sure all teachers who will need reports are listed in the student data file to be sent to NWEA. It will be important for the principal to make sure all teachers have their copies of reports He/she will schedule time to meet with both grade level teams and building level to look at the MAP data and discuss the instructional implications of the data. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

21 Typical Testing Scenario
Teacher gives Proctor a numbered class list Teacher tells students what computer number they will use Proctor uses numbered list to set up lab Teacher brings class to the lab on time Teacher and Proctor help seat students Proctor reads directions and monitors test Teacher remains in lab, takes students back to class after test session is finished

22 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Proctors Teachers Before Testing Ready computers MAKE SURE CORRECT TESTS ARE ASSIGNED!!! Number class lists to computers Have scratch paper and pencils available for Math Let students know their computer assignments Show the “MAP Student Presentation” to students Have students bring a book to read in case they finish early Bring class to computer lab During Testing Read directions Monitor test event Invalidate tests Log scores and/or print screen Remain in lab if possible After Testing Prepare computers for the next group Upload data to NWEA at end of every day (sometimes this is a Tech responsibility) Access and analyze teacher reports Discuss student scores with parents and students Implement necessary instructional modifications The proctor is not usually the classroom teacher. This person should be responsible for setting up the lab in the mornings for the first group, giving directions to the students before they begin testing, setting up for the following groups, giving directions, and so on. This person also helps organize the assignment of computers to the appropriate students and may be the one who distributes numbered class lists and accompanying numbered cards or sticky notes for teachers to give to class before entering the lab. Sometimes, this person will also be the one who uploads data after each testing day. Teachers should work with the proctor/lab supervisor to make sure that students know which computer to go to. The teacher will remain during the testing session and help monitor students’ progress. They should also prepare their students for what will happen when they complete their test – e.g. have them bring a book to read. The teacher should talk to their class about the importance of the test. Let’s talk more about the role of the teacher throughout the testing process. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

23 One Week Prior to Testing
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module One Week Prior to Testing Provide list(s) of students Seating arrangements Special testing arrangements Review schedule Prepare students Handbook— Pages 8-9 Reminders for Teachers Turn to page 8 in your Teacher’s Handbook and go to the section labeled “Reminders for Teachers.” It will be important for you to review this thoroughly before testing begins. You will need to provide a list of your students (by class if you teach more than one period) to the proctor. Help develop seating arrangements. Note any students who might need to be seated in a special location in the lab. Plan for any special testing arrangements; such as a student who might have to be tested alone. You should be familiar with the schedule so you will know when you are to bring your students to the lab. You will also be the person responsible for talking to your students about the MAP test prior to testing. We will talk more about that soon. Handbook— Pages 8-9 Reminders for Teachers © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

24 Other Important Reminders
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Other Important Reminders Outside materials Importance of listening to directions Importance of doing their best Remember that students cannot use any other materials to take the test. No textbooks, other materials, or hand-held calculators are allowed. It is important to talk to students about the importance of listening to the directions they are given by the proctor in the lab so they will know what to do in any instance. Remind them to do their best on the test. Your attitude about the test makes a big difference. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

25 Talking to Students Before Testing
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Talking to Students Before Testing Teacher responsibility: Explain purpose of test Not expected to know the answer to every question Cannot skip questions Cannot go back Pop-up calculator and scroll bar Use MAP Student Presentation – Select <Support>, then <Document Library> Handout — Guide to Talking to Students about the Test Teachers should spend some time with their students before the assigned testing day preparing their students for the experience. Some important things to share with the students are: Purpose of the test: This test is designed to measure how tall students are in each of the subject areas, just like we measure them in height. It will adjust as they answer questions. We need to know exactly where each student is performing to better instruct them. Students will not know the answers to every question. They should use their test taking strategies to make the best choice of answers. Students must select an answer for every question. They cannot skip a question. Students cannot go back once a question has been answered. Because of the adaptive nature of the test, the test is scored after each response. Dependent upon the way the math tests were built, a pop-up calculator may appear for some questions. Students should be taught to use a pop-up calculator on the computer before the testing session. Some reading items contain scroll bars on the passages. Students need to be familiar with scroll bars and their use before the testing session. We have prepared a short PowerPoint MAP Student Presentation that is available on our website and can be used to prepare students for their first testing experience. You also have a handout that is a Guide to Talking to Students about the Test to help you with this each season. Handout — Guide to Talking to Students about the Test © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

26 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
NWEA Resources Click link: <Support> Show participants how to access the Document Library on the NWEA web site. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

27 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
NWEA Resources Document Library Knowledge Base Point out the specific sections of the Document Library available according to position and/or responsibility. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

28 Allowable Accommodations
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Allowable Accommodations No reading any part of language usage or reading test May help with a difficult word in math as long as no additional clues are given If IEP allows test to be read to student, this may be done in math or science If one-on-one testing is needed for a student, plan ahead Handbook— Pages 10 Allowable Accommodations and Modifications A recommended list of Allowable Accommodations and Modifications are in your guide on page 10. A couple of very important things to note: Students may NOT be read any parts of the reading or language tests. Proctor may help with a difficult word in the math or science test as long as no additional clues are given. Handbook— Pages 10 Allowable Accommodations and Modifications © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

29 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Day of Testing Take break before lab Students should bring a book to read after testing Be there on time Help seat students Remain in the lab Handbook— Pages Proctor’s Duties During Testing You can review the steps to follow on testing day. One somewhat obvious step is to have the students take a restroom and/or drink break before entering the lab. Be sure to have students bring a library book to read for when they have completed the test. Tell students to be punctual on the day of testing. When you bring students to the lab, help the proctor get students to their assigned computers. You should remain in the lab during the testing time. This models the importance of the test to students and also provides another adult to monitor testing. Handbook— Pages Proctor’s Duties During Testing © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

30 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Handbook— Page 17 Student Score Log Sheet Now, I just showed you a Survey test (one with only 20 items). This is what a screen would look like if I had given the Goals Survey test. Note that there is now information available for each of the goal strand areas as well as the overall RIT score. This additional information is very useful for using the Learning Continuum, which we will talk in more detail about later. (CLICK) You can use the form in the handout to log the end of screen scores if you do not want to print the score screen. We have provided this form for your use as a sample. Handbook— Page 17 Student Score Log Sheet © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

31 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
MAP Reports Teachers (Reports Web Site) : Teacher, Student Progress, Class Roster, Students Not Tested Instructional Resources (additional cost) MAP Coordinator* : Class (by RIT and/or Alpha), Achievement Status Growth, Student Progress, Alpha by Grade, School Summary, District Summary, Student Growth Summary, Student Growth District Summary Leaders’ Edge (additional cost) Principals* : Class (by RIT and/or Alpha), Achievement Status Growth, Student Progress, Alpha by Grade, School Summary, Student Growth Summary Handbook— Page 19 MAP Reports Many different types of reports are available in the NWEA MAP Reporting site. There are Teacher Level reports which can be accessed by teachers via the Reports Web Site. Teacher reports and student reports are available within hours. Class reports and summary reports are available at Coordinator or Administrator Level. These are available to the MAP Coordinator or Building Level Administrator level after the testing window has been closed, reports are ordered, downloaded, and printed. *Complete reports available only at the end of testing window Handbook— Page 19 MAP Reports © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

32 What’s the difference between MAP classroom reports?
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module What’s the difference between MAP classroom reports? Teacher Report Class Report Accessible to teacher within hours Accessible to district coordinator 72 hours after district testing declared complete Goal area descriptors Goal descriptors and/or RIT ranges Results for current season only Results show historical data Accessible via Internet to teacher Not accessible via Internet to teacher (distributed by district coordinator) (MAP) Explain that the classroom teacher will have access to two different types of reports with data for his/her students. Explain the differences between the Teacher Reports and the Class Reports. Carefully go over each point on the slide: Teacher Report Accessible to teacher within hours Shows goal area descriptors Lo, Av, Hi (no goal area RIT range scores are available on this report) Results for current season only Accessible via Internet to teacher Class Report Accessible only to district coordinator 72 hours after district (or school) testing declared complete Goal descriptors and/or RIT ranges – remind them that reports with RIT ranges must be ordered separately (no additional cost) Results show historical data Not accessible via Internet to teacher (distributed by district coordinator) © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

33 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Accessing MAP Reports BondyBondy ****** Handout – Guide to Accessing Teacher Level Reports There is a Guide to Accessing Teacher Level Reports that will help you do this. Go to https://reports.nwea.org to access teacher reports. (CLICK) User name and password will be sent to MAP Coordinator, who in turn has to distribute teacher user names and passwords to the principals, who will distribute to teachers whose names were in the Class Roster File sent to NWEA. Teachers can access some reports within hours of the data being uploaded to NWEA. To access a sample Teacher Report for training purposes (that matches the handouts), use: Username: BondyBondy (they are not Password: Boy0aw case sensitive) Let’s walk through the steps for accessing your reports… Teachers receive their user name and password from Principal (from MAP Coordinator) Go to https://reports.nwea.org Handout – Guide to Accessing Teacher Level Reports © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

34 Accessing MAP Teacher Reports
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Accessing MAP Teacher Reports Handout – Guide to Accessing Teacher Level Reports This is the entry page you will see when you login. Notice the menu on the left hand side of the screen. The first menu item under Online Reports is Teacher Reports. Note also that you must have Adobe Acrobat installed on your computer. This software is free from Adobe and there is a link on the left hand side to easily download it if you don’t already have it. Must have Adobe Acrobat Reader loaded on computer to open the file Handout – Guide to Accessing Teacher Level Reports © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

35 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Accessing MAP Teacher Reports You will be prompted to select the season, or term, for which you want to see your report. Teachers will be receiving a copy of this in their module and is available on the resource section of the NWEA website. If you schedule a “Stepping Stones to Using Data” workshop, teachers will need to have participants bring their “teacher reports” for this workshop. After selecting the term, click the “submit” button to launch the report in Adobe Acrobat. Handout – Guide to Accessing Teacher Level Reports © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

36 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Teacher Report This shows a sample teacher report as it will appear on your computer with Adobe Acrobat. Notice the goal descriptors… Tests invalidated by the scoring software will be indicated on the final screen. An invalid score can happen for several reasons: either a student took the test too quickly or there was too much error around their score, which could be an indication of continued guessing or just pushing buttons. The teacher report is still a preliminary report. This information listed here is for the facilitator’s information ONLY, in case you get questions: Teacher report specifics: (REMEMBER THAT THE TEACHER REPORT IS CONSIDERED TO BE A PRELIMINARY REPORT, THE CLASS REPORT IS THE EQUIVALENT OF A FINAL REPORT, SINCE IT WILL SHOW RETESTED STUDENT SCORES) SUBJECT AREA - What subject area are we working with? (Have them identify this from sample report.) STUDENT ID NUMBER—Purpose is to track kids’ data; no scores are associated with name, how many John Smith’s do you know? Must stay unique to that student the entire time they are in that system. If you change the number when you move from elementary to middle, you will lose the data. You must understand, you cannot change the ID number for a child. STUDENT’S NAME AND GRADE– What grade is this report for? TEST FORM (ALT) TEST TYPE (MAP) Test Type—This column indicates the type of test your students took. S/G means Goals Survey Test – This is the most common MAP version used. It provides not only a RIT, but also information about each goal strand area. SUR means Survey Test. This is a shorter version, about 20 questions, that only provides a RIT score – no goal information. Any valid score you see is put in your summary data. If a score is not valid, it won’t be printed. All of the information for special codes goes into the a file that accompanies the Class Roster File (CRF), called a Special Programs File (SPF) prior to each season’s testing. The district has control over certain codes. Some are already preset. The people in your district need to be clear on what the exemptions mean when using the codes for the SPF. MEAN - The mean RIT is the average overall RIT of the group on this report. It is determined by adding the RIT scores of every student in the class and dividing by the number of students. MEDIAN - The median is the RIT score in the middle of the class. That is, the same number of students score above this score as below. STANDARD DEVIATION - The standard deviation of the class indicates the diversity of the instructional levels of this group of students. A very simplified definition might be, “the average of the differences from the mean”. The higher the standard deviation, the more varied the instructional levels of the students. We will discuss this in more detail later in the workshop. STANDARD ERROR - This is the range of error, or confidence band, around a score and is used to determine the RIT range and percentile range. RIT RANGE - The RIT Range indicates the range of error or confidence band around a score. A score is NEVER just one number. We have this on the report to use when you are making decisions around any cut scores. You should always look at the score range to make the determination of whether the student makes the cut or not. Students’ performing within the same score range have similar instructional levels. This is the confidence band around the student’s score. If the student took the same test three days in a row, he or she would most probably score within that band. Kind of like a digital scale, you step on and off and get different scores, but they are all around the same range. The range is a total of one standard error. PERCENTILE - Percentile is a score based on a comparison of all of the students in the norming study – 1.05 million students from 323 school districts in 24 states who were administered Achievement Level Tests and Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) tests. As far as we know, this is the largest norming study in the country. Only valid scores are included in this study. Percentile has nothing to do with percent of correct answers (percentage) a student gets on a test. A student with a percentile of 35, for example, means that on this test, this student surpassed 35 percent of the students in the norming study. It also means that 65 percent of the students in the study exceeded this score. PERCENTILE RANGE - Just like the RIT range, the percentile range indicates the confidence band around the percentile score. GOAL PERFORMANCE - These scores indicate how students performed in each of the goal areas listed. Preliminary © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

37 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Class Rosters Now let’s look at a different report that is available to teachers – the Class Roster report. It is the second menu item in the list. You will be prompted to select the term and select your class. If you teach multiple periods and they have created your student data file correctly, you should see all of your periods listed in the drop down box. After making your selection, click the “Submit” button. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

38 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Class Rosters – Student List A screen similar to this will appear. If you click on a student ID, you will see a student’s historical data listed. Let me show you an example of one. For this example, we’ll look at Melanie’s ID. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

39 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Student Information The student’s historical data shows personal information for a student, the class history as loaded in your district’s student data files across time, and every test event for a student. NOTE: The data shown here is from our sample database, whose data is a little strange, so don’t be alarmed… © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

40 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Class Rosters – Student List To access the Individual Student Progress reports, we will go back to the Class Roster Student List page. First note that step 3 above allows you to select the period for which you want to see growth calculated on these student reports. By clicking on a student’s name, you will see the Individual Student Progress report for that individual. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

41 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Individual Student Progress Report Handout — Sample Individual Student Progress Report; Annotated Report Here is a sample of the whole report. You will notice at the top of the report that growth will be calculated from fall to spring. (CLICK) Here is a close-up of the mathematics goal area. Notice the student growth calculation. Handout — Sample Individual Student Progress Report; Annotated Report © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

42 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Class Rosters – Student List By clicking on the Class Name, you receive a .pdf file containing the Individual Student Progress Report for each student in the class who has taken the test. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

43 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Students Not Tested MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Another report available is Students Not Tested. This report shows the total number of students not tested for each Measurement Scale and the chosen term for Nixon Elementary School. Students with invalid scores are also in this list because they need to be retested. Simply choose the term you are interested in from the drop-down box and then click “Submit.” You will then see the report below showing the number of students not tested under each Measurement Scale. It will be important to note that every person, from the MAP Coordinator to the teachers, are critical to making sure ALL students are tested. You can now click on any of the hyperlinks for the number of students not tested for more details. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

44 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Students Not Tested This page shows the number of students in each Grade that have not been tested or that have invalid tests. You can just click on the blue hyperlink showing the number of students not tested to see the list of students. We’ll stay with the 6th Graders for our example and choose the 11 students not tested. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

45 MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module
Students Not Tested MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module This page shows the students that have not been tested or that have invalid tests for Mathematics, Grade 6, and Fall 2003. An empty status indicates that the student has not taken a test for this Measurement Scale; otherwise it shows the reason the test was invalid. Below this section is a list of students that HAVE been tested. When accessing this report (Students Not Tested), you should compare the two lists and verify that the students reported as not tested are not duplicated students that also show up as having tested. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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Sample Class Report (Final) The class report should be produced (ordered by MAP Coordinator) after all retesting is completed. You can order these for a school when they have finished all of their testing, even if the district is not finished yet. It will give much the same information on students as you received on the teacher report, only you will also receive Lexile scores. Talk about other reports that are available in system but don’t show: Summary reports show growth over time in comparison to district and NWEA norms; the District Summary by School reports and District Summary by Grade reports are available. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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Percentile: grade level dependent (NWEA norm) NOTE: goal descriptors (HI,AV,LO) ARE grade dependent An important note is that some of the data on the report is dependent upon grade level, while some is not. (CLICK) The RIT score and RIT range are not dependent on grade level. A student in one grade level can make the same RIT score as a student in another grade and it means basically the same thing. If ordered, the goal RIT ranges mean the same thing. The percentile score, percentile range, and goal descriptors (HI, AV, LO) are dependent upon the grade level norms. RIT: not grade level dependent © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

48 Achievement Status Growth Report
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Achievement Status Growth Report This report lists students alphabetically by class. The report provides each student’s fall-to-spring growth and shows how that growth relates to the student’s fall growth targets based on RIT Block Growth Norms. It comes in the suite of reports to the district MAP Coordinator. Note that this is a fall report. Spring reports will include student’s: Spring RIT/Std. Error Fall to Spring Growth (student’s actual growth) Whether or not the student met the target (based on RIT Block Growth Norms) The growth target Index a negative number if the actual growth was below the RIT Block Growth-based target a positive number if the actual growth was above the RIT Block Growth-based target © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

49 Invalidations and Retesting
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Invalidations and Retesting Invalidations Invalid test events Retesting Handbook— Pages Invalid Scores and Retesting Invalidations Both proctors and teachers needs to know when to invalidate a test. A list of invalidations is listed in your guide. You should be very familiar with these. Invalid Test Events Tests invalidated by the scoring software will be indicated on the final screen. These reasons are listed on the screen. Retesting Students who are absent or receive an invalid test event will need to be retested within the testing window. Handbook— Pages Invalid Scores and Retesting © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

50 Communicating with Students and Parents
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Communicating with Students and Parents Handbook— Page 20 Communicating with Parents and Students Handout — RIT Reference Chart; Goal Strand Structure RIT Reference Chart Goal structures You will want to be as familiar as possible with what scores mean before you sit down to talk to students and parents. I will spend a few minutes letting you know about some resources that are helpful for you to use. Pull out your RIT Reference chart. Pretend you have a 5th grade student who scored a 202 in mathematics. Open your chart to the page on math. The 200 column is closest to 202 so we would look at those items as sample types of items that would be at the student’s instructional level. We would say that items in the columns 190 and below would represent the types of skills the student has secured. Students may not yet be ready for the content in the 210 and higher columns, but this is the direction he or she would be headed. This helps to reference a score. Another helpful document in talking to students and parents is the Goal Strand Structure. You have a copy in your packet. This defines each goal as to the domain that is tested in each area. Especially when goal setting, it is important to know what the content is. Handbook— Page 20 Communicating with Parents and Students Handout — RIT Reference Chart; Goal Strand Structure © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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Individual Student Progress Report The Individual Student Progress Report is very helpful to send home to parents. We recommend these be given to parents in a conference the first time out. You can print the annotated Individual Student Progress Report on the back of your student reports in order to give more information to parents about the data they are receiving. There are sample parent letters available in the Document Library section on the web. You can download these and edit them to meet your needs. Available to teachers with teacher reports © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

52 NWEA Monitoring Growth Document
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module NWEA Monitoring Growth Document typical What are expected RIT and growth scores? NWEA updates the norming data every 3 years. The most recent norming study concluded summer (2002) and new norms were first used for the fall 2002 testing season. We can use the grade-level norms, shown on the Monitoring Growth in Student Achievement chart, to help us with what is “typical”; that is, students scoring at the 50th percentile in the norm study. Emphasize that the word “typical” should be used by teachers and administrators. They should avoid using “expected” or “should be”, as we treat each student as an individual. For example, if the typical median Spring RIT for a student is 230, and (s)he was at a 200 in the fall, then we should not say that the student is “expected” or “should be” at a That is not reasonable. Remember, this is only a point of reference. Over time, you will come to know what “typical” performance looks like for your district, which may be different than the NWEA norms. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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Monitoring Growth in Student Achievement Handout – Monitoring Growth in Student Achievement Mathematics Achievement and Growth When looking at yearly growth on the Monitoring Growth Chart, it is recommended that you use Spring-to-Spring measures when at all possible. This will depend on how many testing sessions each student has participated in. Spring-to-Spring growth takes into account the summer months and it is a better indicator of yearly growth. Fall-to-Spring represents only the instructional months, but can serve as a good indicator of successful teaching strategies implemented during the school year. Also, keep in mind that “growth” is not obtained simply by subtracting the Fall RIT from the Spring RIT or the Fall RIT from the previous Fall RIT. Matched students were used for this process. That is, only the data from students who were tested in the fall who were also tested in the spring were used. Data of students who moved into or out of districts between the fall and spring were not used to determine growth scores. Mean and median RIT scores, however, were obtained through the norming study using all of the students—1,050,000. 250 Handout – Monitoring Growth in Student Achievement © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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RIT Block Growth Norms Monitoring Growth in Student Achievement Chart Handout: RIT Block Growth Norms Only touch on the topic of RIT Block Growth Norms so that participants are aware of them. Once we become comfortable using the Monitoring Growth Chart, we can take a look at another tool for evaluating student growth. From our norming studies we know that low-performing students and high-performing students don’t tend to grow at the same rate. A simple grade-level growth average doesn’t capture this information, and may lead us to inaccurate decisions about students. The RIT Block Growth Norms break out student RIT growth by grade level, into 10 RIT point blocks, based on their RIT score at the beginning of the growth interval. If we look at our Monitoring Growth in Student Achievement Chart, we see, that a typical fifth grade student in reading grows 6.3 RITs from fall to spring. However, we know that not all students were performing at the same RIT level when they took the fall test. The RIT Block Growth Norm charts look at students’ growth based on where they were performing on the RIT scale when they took the fall test. (CLICK) For example, our norming study tells us that students performing between RITs in the fall, typically show a fall-to-spring growth of 11.3 RITs, while students performing between RITs… …in the fall, typically show a fall-to-spring growth of 5.4 RITs. This topic will be discussed in greater depth in the Stepping Stones to Using Data workshop. 11.3 5.4 RIT Block Growth Norm Chart - Handout © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

55 NWEA Learning Continuum
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module NWEA Learning Continuum Hold up copy of Learning Continuum A useful tool for assisting in instructional development Can use in goal setting for students Helpful for flexible grouping planning 1.01 Now let’s talk about a tool called the Learning Continuum (LC). It was created by looking at every valid item in math, reading, and language usage. We determined each item’s skill, concept, new vocabulary, and new signs and symbols and where in the RIT range they were appearing. We classified each of these into goal, sub goal, and 10 point RIT division bands. We have talked several times about references to use – the RIT reference chart, the Monitoring Growth document, etc. This is one more reference to define further what a score means. Think of the Learning Continuum as a guide; it is not to be considered the curriculum, nor as the standards. Lead the group in a discussion around these questions: How many of you are familiar with the Learning Continuum? Does your district have access to it? If so, how accessible is it (teacher copies, district internet web site, etc.)? If not, who is responsible in your district for obtaining or finding out more about it? How are you seeing the Learning Continuum being used in your school and/or district? . © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

56 Learning continuum sequence of skills
RIT  Skill  <150 Whole Numbers Identify fact families with sums 0-18 in horizontal format - Subtract two # in vertical format Subtract a 1-digit number from a 2-digit number with no regrouping - Solve simple addition word problems Solve 1-step word problems involving division Divide a 3-digit or 4-digit # by a 1-digit # Understand the concept of division using pictorial representation Divide a 2-digit by a 2-digit # with a remainder Divide multi-digit # using a calculator N/A Fractions Read, shade & write fractional parts of a group Add mixed # with like denominators with regrouping Multiply mixed # Divide a mixed number by a whole # or a fraction Divide a fraction, whole number, or mixed # by a mixed # Multiply a whole # by a fraction Percents Write a decimal or fraction as a percent Find the percent one # is of another MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Learning continuum sequence of skills This shows how skills articulate or progress through the Learning Continuum. Notice that with whole numbers, we move from basic identification of fact families through dividing multi-digit numbers using a calculator, etc. It is easy to see how the continuum occurs in math. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

57 The Learning Continuum
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module The Learning Continuum Select link: <Data-Tools> Learning Continuum Link Login: Learning Continuum Password: LCAccess Login Handout — Sample Learning Continuum page from web (CLICK) You may access the On-Line Learning Continuum at (CLICK) The Login and Password are on the screen. (CLICK) Select from one of the 3 content areas (Math, Reading, or Language Usage) (CLICK) Select the RIT range and… (CLICK) subcomponent… (CLICK) …and the skills are broken down into 3 categories: Secured skills Emerging skills Future skills A sample page from the online Learning Continuum is included as a handout. Handout — Sample Learning Continuum page from web © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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The Learning Continuum Another Sample Report… Here is one more example: A sample report using the Math content area, a subcomponent choice of Geometry and a RIT score range of Subject : Reading Subcomponent: Word Analysis and Vocabulary Development RIT Score Range: © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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Instructional Resources Here is one more example: A sample report using the Math content area, a subcomponent choice of Geometry and a RIT score range of Click on the Goal to retrieve a PDF file that contains the Learning Continuum pages for each RIT Range for that goal. Click on a student’s name to retrieve a PDF file containing the learning Continuum list of skills that applies to the goal RIT range for the associated goal Click within a cell to retrieve a PDF file containing all the students within the class and the Learning Continuum pages for each RIT Range for that subject © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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A Lexile is… A unit for measuring text difficulty that is linked to the RIT score, Northwest Evaluation Association’s unit for measuring reading comprehension. These links allow teachers to use the student’s RIT score to find books, periodicals, and other reading materials that will be appropriately challenging for each student. Lexile scores are available on the reading reports (Sample Reports p. 4). A RIT is a measure of what students can do. A Lexile measures text and how difficult it is to read and comprehend. We linked our RIT scale to the MetaMetrics Lexile scale. They are both equal interval scales. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

61 The Lexile score represents…
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module The Lexile score represents… NWEA RIT Lexile …the level of text that a student can read with 75% comprehension. For a student with a RIT of 205, books with a 600 Lexile provide an excellent match with the student’s instructional reading level. The book, After the Rain by Norma Mazer is a 600L text. 205 600 (CLICK) A student’s RIT score represents items he/she can get right about 50% of the time, and this translates to a Lexile which represents where a student can read with 75% comprehension. The RIT score is a student’s instructional level, not a mastery level. The Lexile range represents the student’s independent reading level, where a student may read without a lot of support. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

62 Look at the Lexile as a range of scores…
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Look at the Lexile as a range of scores… The upper part of a L range might be used for the student’s group reading program – instructional reading level NWEA RIT Lexile 650L 205 600L The teacher might use the lower part of this range as a target for the student’s – independent reading level We treat a Lexile as a range of 100 below and 50 above their score. (CLICK) At the lower range, students can read with more independence. At the top of this range, students may need more support. 500L © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

63 Guided instruction vs. independent reading
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Guided instruction vs. independent reading NWEA RIT Lexile } Guided instruction (+50)  75% Comprehension } Independent (-100) 650L 205 600L Remember that when we use Lexiles, we should look at them as a range of scores – never as just one number. (CLICK) The lower 100 points in the range (or 100 points below the Lexile score) is considered a range where the student reads fairly well independently. In this case, the child’s independent reading range is Lexiles. The upper 50 points in the range (or 50 points above the Lexile score) is considered a range where the student will need some guidance. In this case, the range for reading with some guidance is 500L © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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Lexile Resources and Select: <Assessments>, then <Lexile Framework> Hold up copy of The Lexile Tour Guide For more information, visit the Lexile.com web site. There is a lot of good information about Lexiles on their web site. We plan to spend more time talking about using Lexiles in the classroom in the NWEA workshop, Climbing the Data Ladder. Another useful document, available on the NWEA web site in the MAP Library, is The Lexile Tour Guide. (hold up copy) The Lexile Tour Guide is exactly that- a helpful tour of the Lexile web site to point out what is available on the site and where it can be found (for example, registering for their free newsletter, finding back issues, ideas on how to incorporate Lexile into your library, accessing their database of books that have already been lexiled and other helpful resources). © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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Next Steps “Stepping Stones to Using Data” workshop Interpreting your reports Class and Goal breakdowns Parent conferencing Putting the data to use “Climbing the Data Ladder” workshop Goal setting Differentiating instruction Planning lessons around the state standards and the Learning Continuum Lexile in-depth There are two workshops your district should plan on over the next year. (CLICK) “Stepping Stones to Using Data” will cover interpreting your reports and beginning to put the data to use. It will cover how to break down your data, more about talking to parents, etc. “Climbing the Data Ladder” takes data use to the next step. A lot more detail on goal setting is covered. We begin working with differentiating instruction and planning lessons around the state standards and the Learning Continuum. We also cover Lexile in-depth and cover a LOT more topics! © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

66 Demo of TestTaker Application
MAP Administration Workshop Teacher Module Demo of TestTaker Application Demo of TestTaker – if you have a PC viewer available that is hooked up to a computer with TestTaker loaded, do a quick demo of what a test looks like for the group. Skip through the first section quickly – selecting a test and selecting a student and get to the test. Answer the first couple of questions correctly then get to the end of the test to show them how data is available immediately. Use a SURVEY test so you only have 20 items. If you have problems with this, use the last slides in this presentation to do a quick walk through. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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These slides are provided as a backup in case you cannot demo TestTaker for the group. You can walk them through these slides instead, if necessary. Walk through the login process – name and password are training and training. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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Show how to select a test for administration. Go into more detail about the differences between the 2-5 tests and the 6 + tests in math and reading. Explain the differences between the 2-5 and 6+ tests in math and reading: Math 2-5: no computation with decimals, fractions, percents, etc. Math 6+: includes those computation items listed above, also ratio and proportion and other more difficult skills Reading 2-5: passage length cannot exceed 100 words Reading 6 +: passage length can go up to 600 words NOTE: This does not effect how high the student can score on the test. A student who takes a 2-5 test can score just as high as a student on a 6+ test, but the content is limited. CALCULATORS may appear on some items on the test. Items are considered “calculator available”, not “calculator necessary”. Items have their difficulties assigned in math based on whether a calculator was available or not. If their tests were built with a calculator available, THEY MUST let students use them. Otherwise, the students’ scores will be skewed and not valid and reliable. Remind them that survey is short form (Tell them “short name, short test”), and survey with goals is long form (Tell them “long name, long test – only one that says goal is the only one where they get goal scores”) © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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Show how to search for a student and select them for testing. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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Note: Test Name appears here This is the first screen each student will see. Demo a test, spending a little time on how students can select answers and move on to the next question. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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Note: Item Number appears here This is a sample item. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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Sound button This button allows the question to be read in Spanish. A Spanish version of the math test is available for an additional fee. The test works the same way. The items appear in English and where appropriate, a sound button appears. When the student pushes the sound button, that part of the item is read to the student in Spanish. This is ONLY available for math and we do not project creating Spanish versions in any other subjects at this time. Districts can call the Portland office if they are interested in purchasing this version of the tests. Pop-up Calculator © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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On PCs, use <Control> <Shift> <P> to move to Proctor Administration Menu. On Macs, use <Apple> <Shift> <P> to move to Proctor Administration Menu. (CLICK) During a test, the Proctor Administration Menu can be accessed by pushing certain keys together (this info is referenced on the TestTaker guide as well). You will have to use your password (the same one that got you into TestTaker) during this process. (CLICK) The “Add Comment” button information that is entered is not currently available on any reports, but can be accessed by NWEA if needed. (CLICK) The “Terminate” button is used to close a test for some reason, for example, a student needs to leave and won’t be returning for a while to complete the test. In this case, you would want to select “Yes” when asked if you want to make the test resumable, which means the student could come back later and complete it. This will keep the student from having to start the test again. To resume a test, simply bring up the student and select the test. It will then prompt you that a test is in progress and do you want to resume it. If you say yes, the test will begin at the last item the student left off at. Not completing a test and starting a new one will cause an “incomplete proctor termination” which will make the system think there is an unfinished test event. If you have no intention of the student finishing the test, say “No” when asked if you want to make the test resumable. This will keep these mystery events from showing up. (CLICK) The “Conditions” button is a button that contains a list of pre-defined codes for invalidation. By choosing one of these items in the list, the user will AUTOMATICALLY invalidate the test. You should then terminate the test. This should be used when invalidating a test in order to record the correct reason for halting the test. (CLICK) The “Close” button will return you to the test in progress. You will be prompted for the password again. © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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These are PRELIMINARY scores ONLY!!! Class reports will have the FINAL scores. Randomly answer the questions to get to the end of the test. Show the result screen and talk about printing a copy of this. Remind participants they must print or record the score here or it will not be available again until data is uploaded and reports are accessed. Goal score ranges can be requested on reports instead of lo, av, and hi. They must be requested at the time the order is placed for reports. The benefit of having the goal ranges is the direct correlation to the Learning Continuum. Some students may receive a score at the end of the test and then when the teacher receives his or her teacher report, that student may be flagged as receiving an invalid score. It is the reporting system that flags the invalid scores and this is why this may happen. (CLICK) You should always go with the score on the report over the one on the screen. If a student tests more than once within the testing window, all test events will show up on the report, but ONLY the one with the lowest error around the score will be counted on the summary information on the report. For any district that feels students may worry about scores displayed at end, the Tech Coordinator can hang a sheet of white paper on top of computer. When student reaches score screen, he or she flips the white sheet over. This covers score and is a flag to proctor that student is finished. Refer group to The Guide for Using TestTaker sheet. Encourage groups to use them as they work through the practice session. Assign a student name to each person or group – usually people work in groups of two. This student number is the one they will use for all of the training activities. Have groups login and choose a test. Recommend they all take survey tests so they are shorter (20 items). Otherwise, they are there a long time. Recommend they take a reading and a math test at minimum. Groups continue practicing until they are comfortable with system.   Beginning this Fall this screen will also display Lexile Scores (Reading Test Only) and Elapsed Time (all tests) Clicking on Continue will allow you to print this Score Screen © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03

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Help us learn from you … Please complete the evaluation form Place it in the designated spot on the way out. Thanks!!! Handout — Evaluation Form Please fill out the evaluation form for the workshop. We, at NWEA, greatly value your feedback. Thank you for coming and for having me/us. Collect participant list from workshop coordinator. Handout — Evaluation Form © 2003 NWEA - Rev. 12/03


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