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Developing Work-Based Learning and Convening Intermediaries Charlotte Cahill JOBS FOR THE FUTURE Pathways to Prosperity Network Institute October 3, 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "Developing Work-Based Learning and Convening Intermediaries Charlotte Cahill JOBS FOR THE FUTURE Pathways to Prosperity Network Institute October 3, 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 Developing Work-Based Learning and Convening Intermediaries Charlotte Cahill JOBS FOR THE FUTURE Pathways to Prosperity Network Institute October 3,

2 Who Makes it Happen? A Regional Pathways Ecosystem 2 Convening Intermediary Employers: Business & Industry Colleges & Universities Local and regional government agencies Community Based Organizations K-12 Schools TA Providers WBL Intermediaries

3 Keys to Building a Regional Ecosystem Convening intermediary Work-based learning intermediary Necessary “glue” in a Pathways region 3

4 What does a convening intermediary do? Convenes key players Forms sub groups Operationalizes the work Develops accountability systems Builds support 4

5 Convening Organizations: Basic Staff Functions 5 Strategic thinking and guidance Shape the strategic direction of the work Oversee operations to ensure they are aligned with strategic direction Community and stakeholder engagement Interface with community, stakeholders, public Build new relationships Facilitation Manages partner relationships on a day-to- day basis Guides meetings and planning to move stakeholders to consensus and action Research and data analysis Develops metrics and evaluates outcomes Monitors policy relevant to the work and helps identify opportunities to influence policy Communications and Development Manage external communication s to ensure unified messaging Develops and maintains relationships with funders Note: A staff position may combine more than one of these functions, or a function may be divided among staff positions.

6 What does a work-based learning intermediary do? Knows the labor market Develops WBL sequences (with educational institutions) Identifies and reaches out to key employers and sector organizations Brokers and aggregates opportunities for sequenced WBL Recruits high- level, visible business champions Reaches out to and partners with community- based organizations 6

7 Considerations for Determining Configuration 7 ChoicesProsCons Build a new organizationSupports perception as honest broker Built for purpose and mission Costs to incorporate and maintain Use existing entity to house intermediary staff or parts of the staff (e.g., WIB, Chamber of Commerce, CBO) Do not need to build a new organization Builds on existing capital and relationships May negatively affect perception as honest broker May be marginalized if unaligned with mission Distribute Intermediary functions to several organizations in Phase I; build out functions over time either as new or in existing organization Builds on existing capital and relationships Provides time to evolve and enhance services Diffusion of efforts and common approach May be marginalized in other organizations if unaligned with mission Costs of coordination across organizations *Whatever the design, the intermediary functions should be housed at entities with a regional reach and mission

8 Examples and Additional Considerations The following slides contain several examples of both convening and WBL intermediary organizations. These may provide some avenues for thinking about how to organize the functions of a similar organization, but it is important to bear in mind that regional needs will inevitably vary, and there is no one-size- fits-all solution. Budget figures have been provided where available, but these should be viewed as extremely rough guidelines, as costs vary widely across the country. 8

9 Hub/Anchor Organization Example 1: Alignment Nashville 9 Coordinates work of nonprofits within the Nashville public school system Goal: Aligning community organizations to positively impact the Nashville community by helping our public schools succeed and our youth live healthier lives 7 staff; revenue in FY was $1,304,325 Source: 3D Collective Impact Report 2013, Alignment Nashville.

10 Alignment Nashville: Committees 10 Organized around 22 committees that are structured around either grade levels or health issues Committee members represent stakeholders that include small non-profits, public schools, city government, public health, higher education, large non-profits, and the business community Committees meet monthly develop aligned, strategic plans Operating Board comprising chair and vice chair of each committee provides oversight for the committees Committee make-up (determined by committee chair and vice-chair with input from Alignment Nashville staff): 2 school principals (additional teachers and counselors included as appropriate) 7 representatives from non-profits in fields relevant to committee’s scope 2 representatives from the broader community (civic/business education) Alignment Nashville staff (ex-officio) Source: Needle-Moving Collective Impact Guide: Capacity and Structure, The Bridgespan Group. and-Tools/Revitalizing-Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and-Structure.aspx

11 Alignment Nashville: Structure 11 Source: 3D Collective Impact Report 2013, Alignment Nashville.

12 Alignment Nashville: Staffing 12 Executive Director Office Manager Associate Executive Director America’s Promise Collaborative Coordinator Associate Director Committee Coordinator Art2STEM Program Manager Grants Developer (part- time) Source: Sydney Rogers, Alignment Nashville Intermediary Network presentation, April 27,

13 Hub/Anchor Organization Example 2: Project U-Turn 13 Project U-Turn is a collaborative, aimed at increasing high-school completion rates in Philadelphia, of more than 50 organizations coordinated by the Philadelphia Youth Network (PYN) 3 FTE dedicated to Project U-Turn Project U-Turn’s success builds on the following capabilities of the Philadelphia Youth Network: Credibility with key partners as an effective, neutral organization Ability to garner and leverage resources on behalf of the initiative and its target population Expertise in facilitating a process that promotes group input and collective leadership Capacity and willingness to think and act on a systems and policy level Sources: Needle-Moving Collective Impact Guide: Capacity and Structure, The Bridgespan Group. and-Tools/Revitalizing-Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and-Structure.aspx; Mobilizing a Cross-Sector Collaborative for Systemic Change: Lessons from Project U-Turn, Philadelphia’s Campaign to Reduce the Dropout Rate, Lili Allen, Jobs for the Future and-Tools/Revitalizing-Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and-Structure.aspxhttp://www.jff.org/sites/default/files/publications/PUT_paper_PDF_VERSION_ pdf

14 Project U-Turn: Structure 14 Develops strategies and work plans 20 members, including youth advocates, representatives of the mayor, schools, nonprofits, and funders Steering Committee About 40 additional partners are formally members of the collaborative Participate in committees and work groups on an as-needed basis Broader Partnership Source: Needle-Moving Collective Impact Guide: Capacity and Structure, The Bridgespan Group. and-Tools/Revitalizing-Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and-Structure.aspxhttp://www.bridgespan.org/Publications- and-Tools/Revitalizing-Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and-Structure.aspx

15 Project U-Turn: Staffing 15 Lead VP Manages convening role, including facilitating steering committee, following up between meetings, and maintaining work plans Oversees daily operations Data Analyst Works within school district Provides steering committee with reports on and evaluations of school-based efforts Policy Analyst Works with Mayor’s Office Monitors changes in relevant policies and provides steering committee with reports on opportunities and challenges Project U-Turn gets ad hoc support from other PYN staff, including communications staff Source: Needle-Moving Collective Impact Guide: Capacity and Structure, The Bridgespan Group. Tools/Revitalizing-Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and-Structure.aspxhttp://www.bridgespan.org/Publications-and- Tools/Revitalizing-Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and-Structure.aspx

16 Hub/Anchor Organization Example 3: The Strive Partnership 16 Using a collective impact approach, the Strive Partnership mobilizes stakeholders in the Cincinnati region to provide children with cradle-to-career support Strive has developed a Roadmap to Success that outlines a series of systemic interventions Strive is a subsidiary of KnowledgeWorks 6+ FTE Organizations across the country that have adopted the Strive model have joined the StriveTogether Cradle to Career Network Source: Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives Case Study: Cincinnati, Covington, and Newport, The Bridgespan Group.

17 The Strive Partnership: Structure 17 Oversees the collaborative and steer the effort 30 members meet quarterly Executive Committee 5 subcommittees of the Executive Committee are organized around Strive’s priority areas Strategy Teams Networks of providers and school officials Recommend and implement specific interventions Collaboratives Source: Needle-Moving Collective Impact Guide: Capacity and Structure, The Bridgespan Group. and-Tools/Revitalizing-Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and-Structure.aspxhttp://www.bridgespan.org/Publications- and-Tools/Revitalizing-Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and-Structure.aspx

18 The Strive Partnership: Staffing 18 Executive Director Oversees work of the collaborat ive Works with strategy teams to develop work plans Program Directors Director of Community Partnership s focuses on community engagement and supports network of collaborativ es Director of School Support aligns out of school programs with school district programs Data Director Oversees data reporting and analysis Assists collaborat ives in determini ng how to use the data Team Coordinator Supports other Strive staff members Strive Partnership Fellow Projects vary Coaches (part-time) Facilitate networks of collaborat ives Provide data and communi cations support Government Affairs (contracted) Develops policy advocacy strategies as needed Source: Needle-Moving Collective Impact Guide: Capacity and Structure, The Bridgespan Group. Tools/Revitalizing-Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and-Structure.aspxhttp://www.bridgespan.org/Publications-and- Tools/Revitalizing-Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and-Structure.aspx

19 WBL Intermediary Example 1: Education Matters in Catawba Valley (North Carolina) 19 Education Matters (EM) provides work-based learning and career exploration and awareness opportunities to over 5,000 middle- and high- school students annually: Tours of local employers in STEM industries for 8 th graders WorkKeys assessments Career and College Ready Portfolio process for high-school juniors Career Prep Conference for 150 high-school seniors Business leader forum to familiarize high school seniors with career areas EM works to connect and strengthen partnerships among local schools and employers, Catawba Valley Community College, and state agencies Housed at Catawba Valley Community College; 1 FTE; annual budget of $116,404 Source: Education Matters website.

20 Education Matters: Structure and Staffing 20 Education Matters Director Catawba Valley Community College K-12 Schools Employers; Business and Industry State and local government agencies The community college houses Education Matters and pays the director’s salary. College faculty, staff, and administration contribute to career exploration events. School-based career development coordinators (salaries are part of district budgets) with EM director to develop events and place students.

21 WBL Intermediary Example 2: The Boston Private Industry Council 21 The Boston Private Industry Council (PIC) serves as both a WBL intermediary for Boston and as the city’s WIB. Its school-to-career programs and activities include: Brokering students into summer jobs and school-year internships – over 3,000 students placed in summer jobs and 345 employers participating in job and internship programs Career specialists in 29 local high schools that connect students to WBL opportunities Dropout prevention and recovery The PIC is a public-private partnership with Council members, who include prominent business, labor, higher education, government, and community leaders, appointed by the city’s mayor. The Board of Directors, is elected by the Council members and guides the PIC’s strategic direction. 49 staff and a budget of $4.3 million (excluding pass-through funds to Career Centers and Summer Jobs) Sources: Boston Private Industry Council 2013 Annual Report.

22 The PIC: Key Staff Roles for School-to-Career Programs 22 Executive Director Interface with community and stakeholders, public engagement, partnerships, development Researcher Metrics, labor market analyses and surveys, goal setting, evaluation Work-Based Learning Director Direct all school- based Career Specialists and sector-specific Account Managers of employer relationships Career Specialists and Account Managers Manage employer relationships and work-based learning placements

23 Developing a Sustainable Funding Model 23 Developing multiple funding sources, including both public and private investments, helps ensure the long-term viability of an organization Develop strategic partnerships Resources and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, from partner organizations, can add capacity to a linking organization Develop messaging that highlights the value of the organization Comprehensive data collection and outcomes measurement plans are key to crafting a compelling message about the value of the work Offer fee-for service training and technical assistance to non-partner organizations Make sure that funders understand the long-term strategy behind the work Sources: Needle-Moving Collective Impact Guide: Capacity and Structure, The Bridgespan Group. and-Tools/Revitalizing-Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and-Structure.aspx; Rising to the Challenge: The Strategies of Social Service Intermediaries, Lori Delale-O’Connor and Karen E. Walker, Public/Private Ventures and Child Trends. and-Tools/Revitalizing-Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and-Structure.aspx

24 UC Davis 3-Step Sustainability Cycle 24 1.Identify the result needed by stakeholders. 2.Design the work and evaluation around those results. 3.Market the results to partners and stakeholders to secure longer-term funding. These activities should be carried out in coordination with a sustainability work group, the functions of which include: Developing a complete picture of available resources, gaps, needed outcomes, and potential funding mechanisms Tracking, understanding, and acting on public and private funding opportunities Reviewing and revising MOUs with partners Source: Community School Partnerships Toolkit, UC Davis School of Education. partnerships-toolkithttp://education.ucdavis.edu/post/community-school- partnerships-toolkit

25 Alignment Nashville: Diverse Funding Streams 25 Funding for Alignment Nashville is provided by a diverse group of public and private funders that parallels the many sectors across which the organization works. Sector of FundersFunder Names Public Metro Nashville Government Metro Nashville Public Schools National Science Foundation Private Ford Motor Company Fund Ingram Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce United Healthcare Vanderbilt University Foundation/Philanthropic America’s Promise Alliance Baptist Healing Trust Frist Foundation HCA Foundation Healthways Foundation Memorial Foundation Source: 3D Collective Impact Report 2013, Alignment Nashville.

26 Project U-Turn: Anchor Funding 26 Administrative and political foundation of the Philadelphia Youth Network (PYN), which was started in 1999, allowed it to successfully secure a demonstration grant to launch Project U-Turn in 2004 Demonstration grant from Youth Transition Funders Group (YTFG) provided $275,000 annually for 2 years and support from Jobs for the Future William Penn Foundation committed $600,000 for first two years PYN has reapplied every two years, winning three subsequent grants from the Foundation Foundation has indicated that it understands work will likely have a 10-year arc PYN also seeks implementation funding on behalf of Project U-Turn, then re- grants the funds to partners Source: Needle-Moving Collective Impact Guide: Capacity and Structure, The Bridgespan Group. Structure.aspx Structure.aspx

27 The Strive Partnership: Collaborative Funding 27 Support from three funders – KnowledgeWorks, the Greater Cincinnati Foundation, and United Way of Greater Cincinnati – working collaboratively provided foundation for the Strive Partnership KnowledgeWorks continues to provide $500,000 annually to the Strive Partnership and 2 foundations have made commitments to Strive to support its partners to ensure continuation of the work Strive, with the United Way of Greater Cincinnati, is a lead partner in the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Social Innovation Fund The Social Innovation Fund award provided $2 million over two years from the Corporation for National and Community Service to build a larger base of support for local organizations Federal dollars were used as a catalyst for local support Collaborating funders include: Duke Energy Foundation, The Thomas J. Emery Memorial, The Greater Cincinnati Foundation, The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation, The Andrew Jergens Foundation, KnowledgeWorks, JPMorgan Chase Foundation, The Daniel and Susan Pfau Foundation, the P&G Fund, SC Ministry Foundation, Jacob G. Schmidlapp Trust, Toyota, and The Craig Young Family Foundation Source: Needle-Moving Collective Impact Guide: Capacity and Structure, The Bridgespan Group. Structure.aspx; Collaborative Funding for Greater Impact: A Case Study of the Cincinnati Experience, Grantmakers for Effective Organizations. Structure.aspxhttp://gosw.org/files/misc/sww_collab_funding_ pdf

28 WBL Intermediary Example: The Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership/BIG STEP 28 The Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership (WRTP) is w workforce intermediary, established in the 1990s, that provides training, certification, apprenticeship, and career services to adults and youth in Milwaukee. WRTP works with the Milwaukee Public Schools to develop career pathways for youth that are aligned with WRTP’s intermediary work. A major area of focus is getting youth into apprenticeship programs. Programs include career pathways development at a local high school, after-school programs that emphasize job-readiness training, and an out-of- school program. Working with Bradley Technical High School (total enrollment of 1,063) and area employers to develop pathways that incorporate WBL opportunities in construction and architecture, manufacturing and engineering, and communications Cross-sectoral advisory board meets monthly and has provided input on curriculum and development of WBL opportunities WRTP works with a consortium of 45 school districts in the Milkwaukee area and is putting together a catalog of WBL services that they can offer to small districts that lack the capacity to develop in-house WBL programs WRTP has an annual budget of approximately $3 million with a mix of public and private funding.

29 WRTP: Key Staff Roles for Youth Program 29 Director Interface with community and stakeholders, public engagement, partnerships; based at partner high school Youth Case Manager & Outreach Oversees after-school program and program for out-of-school youth Public Ally Responsible for community outreach and middle-school recruitment; works with after-school program

30 WBL Intermediary Example: Centralina (NC) Workforce Development Board Youth Council 30 The Youth Council is part of the committee structure of the region’s WIB, the Centralina Workforce Development Board. A key function of the Youth Council is to coordinate WIA activities for youth, including: Tutoring, study skills training Alternative secondary school Summer employment opportunities Paid and unpaid work experiences, including internships and job shadowing Occupational skill training Leadership development Supportive services Adult mentoring Follow- up services Comprehensive guidance and counseling The Youth Council works with employers to develop WBL opportunities that include mentoring, volunteering, job shadowing, apprenticeships, internships and summer jobs. Sources:

31 WBL Intermediary Example: STEP-UP Achieve in Minneapolis 31 STEP-UP Achieve is a summer jobs program that works in partnership with AchieveMpls and the Minneapolis WorkForce Centers to place youth (ages ) in paid internships. Participants have opportunities to explore career interests, develop professional connections, receive work readiness training certified by the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, and receive on-the-job training. The program places 800 youth in internships with 150 area employers annually. Each year, program participants earn a total of over $1 million in wages. The program includes 5 career pipelines: financial services, healthcare careers, legal careers, outdoor/recreation/environmental, and STEM careers. The pipelines provide year-round career development opportunities through targeted trainings, career exposure events, and industry-recognized certification programs. In 2013, 93% of program participants were youth of color, 20% were born outside of the United States, and 15% were youth with disabilities. Sources: employment-program-celebrates-10-years-and internshipshttp://www.achievempls.org/stepupachieve

32 STEP-UP Achieve: Key Staff Roles 32 Director Interface with community and stakeholders, public engagement, partnerships Manager of Training and Data Oversees data reporting and analysis; manages work readiness training program Senior Program Associate Organizes the STEP-UP Achieve health careers pipeline, manages many business relationships, and recruits and trains youth 3 Program Associates Youth and employer outreach and recruitment; coordination of work readiness training Training and Events Coordinator Organizes events and provides logistical support to training program Source:

33 References and Additional Resources 33 Workforce Partnership Guidance Tool, National Fund for Workforce Solutions kforce_guidance_tool_ pdfhttp://nfwsolutions.org/sites/nfwsolutions.org/files/publications/NFWS_wor kforce_guidance_tool_ pdf Mobilizing a Cross-Sector Collaborative for Systemic Change: Lessons from Project U-Turn, Philadelphia’s Campaign to Reduce the Dropout Rate, Lili Allen, Jobs for the Future N_ pdfhttp://www.jff.org/sites/default/files/publications/PUT_paper_PDF_VERSIO N_ pdf Needle-Moving Collective Impact Guide: Capacity and Structure, The Bridgespan Group Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and- Structure.aspxhttp://www.bridgespan.org/Publications-and-Tools/Revitalizing- Communities/Community-Collaboratives/Guide-Capacity-and- Structure.aspx Case studies, organizational structure, funding models

34 References and Additional Resources (continued) 34 Intermediary Development: Frameworks for Success A Quick Guide for Practitioners, Intermediary Network (INet) Collaborative Funding for Greater Impact: A Case Study of the Cincinnati Experience, Grantmakers for Effective Organizations Community School Partnerships Toolkit, UC Davis School of Education Sample site coordinator job description, sample list of people and organizations, step-by-step model for sustainability planning


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