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GRANT PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT University of California, Los Angeles Office of Contract and Grant Administration 10920 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 1200 (310) 794-0102.

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Presentation on theme: "GRANT PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT University of California, Los Angeles Office of Contract and Grant Administration 10920 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 1200 (310) 794-0102."— Presentation transcript:

1 GRANT PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT University of California, Los Angeles Office of Contract and Grant Administration Wilshire Blvd, Suite 1200 (310)

2 Your Long-Term Research Goal n Analyze it for “chunks” n Choose a starting point –Do-able –Current –Interesting “If politics is the art of the possible, research is surely the art of the soluble. Both are immensely practical- minded affairs.” -Sir Peter Medawar

3 Getting Started n Survey the literature n Learn about the current work n Discuss ideas with colleagues n Determine objectives n Assess feasibility n Do preliminary work

4 Identify a Funder n n Community of Science n IRIS n SPIN “Money’s a horrid thing to follow, but a charming thing to meet.”- Gilbert Osmond

5 Use the Program Description and Proposal Guidelines n Understand the funding priorities n Make a checklist of review criteria n Note specifications: length, format, binding, copies, etc. n Prepare a concept description –Plan methods –Identify needed resources

6 Make Contacts at UCLA n Dean and/or department chair n Institutional commitment n Human subjects, animal subjects, other reviews n Goldenrod form

7 Speak to the Program Officer n Learn the funder’s perspective n Learn about biases n Learn about the review process n Ask to see previously funded proposals “One of the best ways to persuade others is with your ears--by listening to them.” -Dean Rusk

8 Create a Written Schedule of Work Deadlines n Define tasks n Assign responsibilities n Timeline for today through the funder deadline “God gives every bird his worm, but He does not throw it into the nest.”-P. D. James

9 The Reviewer Wants to Know- n WHAT you will do n HOW MUCH it will cost n WHY it needs to be done n WHAT has already been done n HOW your work will be done n WHO will do the work

10 Effective Proposals n Use visible organization –Outlines, headings –Review criteria, funder preferences –Topic sentences “Nothing astonishes men so much as common sense and plain dealing.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson

11 Effective Proposals n Are concise and active –Avoid jargon or include a glossary –Avoid passive tense –Avoid subjunctive tense –Avoid unnecessary wordiness “Nothing astonishes men so much as common sense and plain dealing.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson

12 Typical Proposal Organization n Cover sheet, title page, cover letter n Budget information n Abstract/executive summary n Narrative n Appendices/attachments

13 Cover Pages n Grant Data Form n Title n Cover letter n Cover page (eg. SF 424) –Official applicant: The Regents of the University of California n Table of contents

14 Budget Information n Be realistic n Obvious ties to the narrative n Include F&A (Facilities & Administrative) Costs n Contact the department business office or Office of Contract and Grant Administration n Follow the requested format

15 Budget Information n Typical cost categories –Personnel –Fringe benefits –Consulting/contractual –Equipment –Supplies –Travel –F&A costs

16 Budget Information n Budget Narrative (Justification) –Explain what costs represent –Explain how you arrived at your figures –Be specific and thorough “We all need money, but there are degrees of desperation.” -Anthony Burgess

17 Abstract n The Goals –Build interest and excitement –Establish credibility

18 Abstract n The Content –What will be done –How much will it cost –How it will be done –Why it is significant –By whom it will be done

19 Abstract n The Approach –200 words –Tight, almost terse, style –Future tense –Revise, revise, revise, revise, revise... “I apologize for the length of this letter. I didn’t have time to write a short one.” -Mark Twain

20 The Narrative n Problem/Need/Significance n Statement of Goals n Previous Work n Methods n Key Personnel n Evaluation n Dissemination and Future Funding

21 The Narrative n Problem/Need/Significance –Clearly and concisely state the significance –Convey a sense of urgency –Link the need or significance to the funder’s agenda and goals –Explicitly link the problem or need to the goals of the project

22 The Narrative n Statement of Goals –Goal - statement of the general purpose –Objectives - measurable steps to reach the goal Be careful what you ask for--you might get it.

23 The Narrative n Previous Work –Work by others –Work by you

24 The Narrative n Methods –Link methods to objectives –Write to the reviewers –Build confidence –Describe in detail –Provide a timetable –Address potential limitations and difficulties

25 The Narrative n Key Personnel –Principal Investigator/Project Director –Co-investigators –Consultants –Relevant training and productivity “The meek may inherit the earth, but not the grant dollars.” -John Paul Getty

26 The Narrative n Evaluation –Progress toward the stated objectives –Collection and analysis of data –Attainment of the overall goal(s)

27 The Narrative n Dissemination and Future Funding –Consider the funder’s audience –Make your project a useful contribution to the field –Consider the funder’s return on investment

28 The Narrative -- Recap n Problem/Need/Significance n Statement of Goals n Previous Work n Methods n Key Personnel n Evaluation n Dissemination and Future Funding Let’s face it, writing is hell.” -William Styron

29 Typical Proposal Organization n Cover sheet, title page, cover letter n Budget information n Abstract/executive summary n Narrative n Appendices/attachments

30 Appendices/Attachments n Assurances and certifications n Glossary n Description of facilities n Letters of commitment or support n Curriculum vitae

31 You are here

32 Revision and Formatting n Solicit criticism from peers n Use your reviews n Refer back to the program description and reviewer guidelines “Asking a working writer what he thinks about critics is like asking a lamp-post what it feels about dogs.” -Christopher Hampton

33 Revision and Formatting n Watch for –long sentences –vague words –passive verbs –abbreviations –inconsistencies “Tell me my fault... For I had rather wince, than die. Men do not call the surgeon to commend the bone, but to set it” -Emily Dickinson

34 Submit the Proposal n Final signatures on Goldenrod n Final copies to Office of Contract and Grant Administration n The Office of Contract and Grant Administration will mail your proposal (if it received in a timely manner) “Care and quality are important but perfection is not a reasonable goal. Just finish the damn thing and submit it!” -Kaplan & Ryan

35 If it’s not funded this time... n Reviewer comments n Revise and resubmit n Identify other potential funders “Experience is a good teacher, but she sends in terrific bills.” -Minna Antrim

36 When it’s funded... n Celebrate! n Budget negotiations n Reviewer comments n Office of Contract and Grant Administration

37 How Office of Contract and Grant Administration Can Help n Proposal planning and development n Budget review n Proposal formatting n General questions

38 Other UCLA Resources n Web page-- n Colleagues n Office of Corporate, Foundation and Research Relations n Office of Contract and Grant Administration

39 GRANT PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT Do it now! Grant work is like the lottery...

40 Acknowledgement n For concept and permission to use: Mary Licklider, Senior Grant Writer University of Missouri-Columbia Office of Research


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