Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

19 th Century Slavery “The Peculiar Institution” THE OLD SOUTH & SLAVERY 1820-1860A10Q7.10.30.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "19 th Century Slavery “The Peculiar Institution” THE OLD SOUTH & SLAVERY 1820-1860A10Q7.10.30."— Presentation transcript:

1 19 th Century Slavery “The Peculiar Institution” THE OLD SOUTH & SLAVERY A10Q

2 Compromises 3/5 – Constitution “recognizes slavery” 3/5 – Constitution “recognizes slavery” Commerce – Importation banned in 1808 Commerce – Importation banned in 1808 Missouri (1820) – Line Missouri (1820) – Line Legitimizes Slavery? Legitimizes Slavery? Gag Rule Gag Rule – Popular Sovereignty, Fugitive Slave Act, 1850 – Popular Sovereignty, Fugitive Slave Act, Kansas-Nebraska – Pop Sov Kansas-Nebraska – Pop Sov

3 Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime where of the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. Section 2. Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

4

5 Essential Question To what degree was the South developing as a distinctively different region from the rest of the United States during the period 1820 to 1860? To what degree was the South developing as a distinctively different region from the rest of the United States during the period 1820 to 1860? To what degree did slavery shape life in the South during this period? To what degree did slavery shape life in the South during this period? (Consider political, economic, social and intellectual aspects of life in the South)

6 Slaves Using the Cotton Gin

7 Slaves Working in a Sugar-Boiling House, 1823

8 Slave Auction: Charleston, SC-1856

9 A. The Southern Economy 1.Primarily agrarian 2.Economic power shifted from the “upper South” to the “lower South” 3.“Cotton Is King!”  million Bales exported per year (57% of US exports)

10 The Agricultural Economy of the South,1860

11 Changes in Cotton Production 1820 ▲ 1860 ▼

12 Value of Cotton Exports As a Percentage of All U.S. Exports

13 A. The Southern Economy 4.Very slow development of industry 5.Rudimentary financial system. 6.Economic dependence on North 7.Inadequate transportation system.

14 Anti-Slave Pamphlet

15 B. SOUTHERN SOCIETY (1850) “Slavocracy” [plantation owners, small slaveowners] The “Plain Folk” [white yeoman farmers, tenant farmers,sandhillers,hill people] 6,000,000 Black Freemen Black Slaves 3,200, ,000 Total US Population --> 23,000,000 [9,450,000 in the South = 40%]

16 Southern Society in 1860

17 Slave-Owning Families (1850)

18 B. WHITE SOCIETY & CULTURE Why did many Southerners support the slave system when 75% didn’t own slaves? Why did many Southerners support the slave system when 75% didn’t own slaves? Was there a change in attitude re slavery? Was there a change in attitude re slavery? How did they justify slavery? How did they justify slavery? Who did NOT support the slave system? Who did NOT support the slave system? Plantation House, St. Mary’s, MD (1830s) Southern Yeoman farmer’s home

19 B. WHITE SOCIETY & CULTURE 3.Defense of Slavery & White Supremacy “necessary evil” → “positive good” “necessary evil” → “positive good” Legal & constitutional Legal & constitutional History History Religious Religious Better than North – “wage slaves” Better than North – “wage slaves” Black Inferiority Black Inferiority [Among Southerners] Elevated poor whites [Among Southerners] Elevated poor whites

20 Southern Pro-Slavery Propaganda

21 Slave Master Brands Slave Accoutrements Slave muzzle

22 Slave Auction: Charleston, SC-1856

23 Anti-Slave Pamphlet

24 C. SLAVERY & SLAVE CULTURE 1. “Peculiar Institution” 2. Slave trade - Middle Passage 3. Protection under law Constitution – Art IV, Sec 2 Constitution – Art IV, Sec 2 Fugitive Slave Act (1793) Fugitive Slave Act (1793)

25 Paths of the Internal Slave Trade

26 C. SLAVERY & SLAVE CULTURE 4. Slave Life & Culture Black Christianity [Baptists or Methodists]: * more emotional worship services; negro spirituals. Nuclear family with extended kin links, where possible. Importance of music in their lives. [esp.spirituals]. Slave codes Resistance Nat Turner “Sambo” Slave Rebellions and Uprisings,

27 Life of a Slave Most slaves had Sundays off and they went to church. Most slaves had Sundays off and they went to church. Most slaves could not read or write, and it was illegal for them to learn. Most slaves could not read or write, and it was illegal for them to learn. Slave Codes-They could not: leave their home without a pass, carry a weapon, gather in groups, own property, legally marry, defend themselves against a white person, or speak in court. Slave Codes-They could not: leave their home without a pass, carry a weapon, gather in groups, own property, legally marry, defend themselves against a white person, or speak in court.

28 Slave Cabin and Occupants Near Eufala, Barbour County, Alabama

29

30 Resistance Flight-Slaves would runaway. Flight-Slaves would runaway. Truancy-Flight for a short amount of time and then the slave came back. Truancy-Flight for a short amount of time and then the slave came back. Refusal to reproduce-Women refused to have children. Refusal to reproduce-Women refused to have children. Covert Action-Slaves would sometimes kill animals, destroy crops, start fires, steal stuff, break tools, poison food. Covert Action-Slaves would sometimes kill animals, destroy crops, start fires, steal stuff, break tools, poison food.

31 Violence 4 major slave revolts- 4 major slave revolts- Stono Rebellion-failed revolt in South Carolina in 1739 Stono Rebellion-failed revolt in South Carolina in 1739 Gabriel Prosser-led failed revolt in Virginia in 1800 Gabriel Prosser-led failed revolt in Virginia in 1800 Denmark Vessey-led failed revolt in South Carolina in 1822 Denmark Vessey-led failed revolt in South Carolina in 1822 Nat Turner-killed 60 white people in Virginia in 1831 Nat Turner-killed 60 white people in Virginia in 1831

32 Resistance to Slavery

33

34 Defense of Slavery

35 The Civil War and the Emancipation Proclamation Early in the war, Lincoln began to think about ending slavery in the South to help end the war. Early in the war, Lincoln began to think about ending slavery in the South to help end the war. On September 22, 1862 he issued the Emancipation Proclamation which declared an end to slavery in the states in rebellion on January 1, On September 22, 1862 he issued the Emancipation Proclamation which declared an end to slavery in the states in rebellion on January 1, What did it do? Nothing. It only freed slaves in the states that had seceded. What did it do? Nothing. It only freed slaves in the states that had seceded.

36 End of the Civil War and the 13 th Amendment The South lost, and the states were forced to accept the 13 th Amendment to the Constitution before they could be readmitted into the Union. The South lost, and the states were forced to accept the 13 th Amendment to the Constitution before they could be readmitted into the Union. 13 th Amendment-It abolished slavery in the United States. 13 th Amendment-It abolished slavery in the United States. It was ratified in It was ratified in 1865.

37 Adapted from presentation by: Adapted from presentation by: Ms. Susan M. Pojer Horace Greeley HS Chappaqua, NY and

38 Sources Library of Congress – Prints and Photographs Division Online Catalog - Library of Congress – Prints and Photographs Division Online Catalog - Library of Congress – African Mosaic - Library of Congress – African Mosaic - Africans in America – PBS - Africans in America – PBS -


Download ppt "19 th Century Slavery “The Peculiar Institution” THE OLD SOUTH & SLAVERY 1820-1860A10Q7.10.30."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google