Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Blue Vervain Verbena hastata It produces slender flower spikes arranged like a candelabra. The tiny blue or white flowers bloom and die from the bottoms.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Blue Vervain Verbena hastata It produces slender flower spikes arranged like a candelabra. The tiny blue or white flowers bloom and die from the bottoms."— Presentation transcript:

1 Blue Vervain Verbena hastata It produces slender flower spikes arranged like a candelabra. The tiny blue or white flowers bloom and die from the bottoms of the spikes. Common Name: Swamp Verbena Family: Vervain (Verbenaceae) Habitat: damp thickets, roadsides, shores Height: 2-6 feet Flower size: 1/8 inch wide Flower color: blue-purple Flowering time: July to September Origin: native Fun Fact: In ancient times, the plant was thought to be a cure-all among medicinal plants and the genus name is Latin for sacred plant. How to grow : Biennial. Blue Vervain likes sun, part-shade or shade and moist soil. Propagation: Propagate by seed. Seed requires cool-moist stratification for 30 days. After stratification, seeds can be incubated at from degrees in the presence of light. Benefits: Attracts bees, birds, butterflies Larval host to common buckeye common buckeye Buckeye

2 Sneezeweed Helenium autumnale The yellow-green disk at the center of the flowers is a distinguishing mark for sneezeweed. Common Name: Swamp Sunflower Family: Aster (Asteraceae) Habitat: wet meadows, thickets, swamps Height: 2-5 feet Flower size: heads 1-1/2 inches across Flower color: yellow Flowering time: August to November Origin: native Warning: POISONOUS PARTS: Leaves, flowers, seeds. Toxic only if eaten in large quantities. Toxic Principle: Sesquiterpene lactone. Fun Fact: Sneezeweed does not derive its common name from the effects of its pollen. It was crushed to make a snuff that promoted sneezing. How to grow : Sneezeweeds like moist, very rich soil and a location in full sun. Set the plants two or more feet apart. Stake taller types. To keep tall types neater, cut them back very hard around July 4. They will branch out and bloom on shorter, bushier stems. Deadhead plants after blooms have started to fade. Propagation: By division in early spring and from seed. Benefits: Conspicuous Flowers Attracts birds

3 Green-headed Coneflower Rudbeckia laciniata A sunflower-like perennial, green-head coneflower’s branched, leafy stalk grows 3-12 ft. tall. The center cones elongate and become brownish as the seeds ripen. Common Name: Cut-leaf Coneflower Family: Aster (Asteraceae) Habitat: moist rich fields and thickets Height: 3-12 feet Flower size: flowerhead 3 inches across Flower color: yellow rays around a green disk Flowering time: July to September Origin: native Fun Fact: Called Coneflowers because of their look, with petals splayed back, they display long nectar-filled centers that make them the perfect flower for a butterfly garden. How to grow : Rudbeckia flowers prefer moisture-retentive soil with partial shade or full-sun. Propagation: Untreated seed Benefits: Conspicuous Flowers Attracts birds

4 Spotted Joe-Pye-weed Eupatoriadelphus maculatus Has clusters of dull pink flowers. An important source of honey attracting pollinators. Family: Aster (Asteraceae) Habitat: wet thickets, meadows Height: 2-6 feet Flower size: tiny, in clusters 4-6 inches across Flower color: dull pink Flowering time: July to September Origin: native Fun Fact: Spotted Joe-Pye weed got its name for having dark purple spots on its stems, though sometimes the stems are solid dark purple. How to grow : Can grow in sun, shade or part-shade. Moist conditions. Divide the plants in fall as they go dormant, or in the spring just as shoots first appear. Propagation: Sow seeds in the fall and plant thickly as germination is usually low. Propagation is also possible by softwood cuttings taken in late spring for by division. Benefits: Fragrant Flowers Attracts birds

5 Narrow-leaved Mountain-mint Pycnanthemum tenuifolium The minty-smelling plants have terminal flower clusters composed of numerous, small, two-lipped corollas with purple spots. Common Name: Mountain Mint Family: Mint (Lamiaceae) Habitat: fields, thickets, dry woods Height: 1-3 feet Flower size: 1/4 inch long, blooming on disk-shaped heads around 3/4 inch across Flower color: pale purple to white with purple spots Flowering time: July to October Origin: native Fun Fact: Dried leaves may be used as flavorings and in teas. Used to repel mosquitoes by rubbing leaves on skin. Bees and butterflies use flowers. Deer eat leaves. Numerous animals eat seeds. How to grow : Mountain Mint grows in sun or part-shade with medium moisture. Begins to bloom when grown to ~ 1 ft. wide. Propagation: Best propagated cuttings or divisions. Tip cuttings are easy and reliable, taken in June. For divisions, lift the clump in late fall or early spring and use pruning shears to divide the shallow. Benefits: Conspicuous Flowers Fragrant / Interesting Foliage Attracts Birds, Butterflies Nectar Source

6 Black-eyed Susan Rudbeckia hirta This native prairie biennial forms a rosette of leaves the first year, followed by flowers the second year. It is covered with hairs that give it a slightly rough texture. Family: Aster (Asteraceae) Habitat: fields, open woods, roadsides Height: 1-3 feet Flower size: 2-3 inches across Flower color: yellow and dark brown Flowering time: June to October Origin: Midwestern U.S. Fun Fact: This annuals may bloom longer with some afternoon shade. Birds enjoy the ripe seeds. Black-eyed Susan can become aggressive if given too perfect an environment and not enough competition. How to grow : Black Eyed Susans like sun, part-shade, shade. Moist but well-drained soil. Propagation: Propagates very easily from seed sown in fall or spring. The seed requires several days of moisture and should germinate in one to two weeks. Benefits: Conspicuous Flowers Attracts Nectar-Bees, Nectar-Butterflies, Nectar- insects, Seed Granivorous birds Larval Host to Gorgone Checkerspot, Bordered Patch butterfly Bordered Patch Gorgone Checkerspot

7 New England Aster Symphyotrichum novae-angliae Compared to other native asters, New England aster flowers have more rays (around 40) and, usually, more intense purple color. Family: Aster (Asteraceae) Habitat: damp thickets and meadows Height: 3-7 feet Flower size: flowerheads around 1-1/2 inches across Flower color: purple rays around a yellow disk Flowering time: August to October Origin: native Fun Fact: Bees and butterflies frequent this wildflower. Nectar source for Monarch butterflies. How to grow: New England aster flowers until frost. Its roots should be divided every several years to keep the plant growing vigorously. Can be aggressive. Propagation: Mature plants can be divided in the spring by sectioning off individual stems Benefits: Conspicuous Flowers Attracts Butterflies Larval Host: Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos) and checkerspot butterflies Nectar Source Pearl Crescent

8 Spiderwort Tradescantia ohiensis The branched, erect stems of bluejacket or Ohio spiderwort are tinged purple and bear grass-like leaves from up to eight nodes. The total height is from 2-3 ft. Showy clusters of blue, three-petaled flowers top the stems. Family: Spiderwort (Commelinaceae) Habitat: open woods, thickets & roadsides Height: 1 to 3 feet Flower size: 1 to 1-1/2 inches across Flower color: blue or purple Flowering time: May to July Origin: native Fun Fact: Flowers tend to open in the morning. When touched in the heat of the day, the flowers shrivel to a fluid jelly. How to grow : Spiderwort likes part shade, low water use. Various wet to dry soils. Propagation: Divide in early fall or very early spring. Stem cuttings may be taken any time during the growing season.

9 Swamp Milkweed Asclepias incarnata The large, bright, terminal blossoms of this showy perennial are made up of small, rose-purple flowers. Opposite, narrow, lance-shaped leaves line the erect, open-branched stem. Elongated, tan-brown seed pods persist into winter. Family: Milkweed (Asclepiadaceae) Habitat: swamps, wet spots Height: 2-4 feet Flower size: 1/4 inch across Flower color: pink Flowering time: June to August Origin: native Warning: ALL PARTS ARE POISONOUS if eaten in large quantities. Toxic Principle: Cardiac glycosides and resinoids. Fun Fact: Milkweeds are an important food source for the monarch caterpillars. How to grow : likes sun or part-shade, high moisture soil. Will inevitably have aphids; only a problem if plant looks sick; spray the plant and aphids with soapy water or support plant with your hand and blast it with high-pressure water. Propagation: Easy to start from seed. Collect seeds in Oct./Nov. Established plants may be divided in the spring. Benefits: Fragrant Flowers Attracts Hummingbirds, Butterflies Larval Host: Monarch and Queen butterflies Monarch Queen

10 Blazing-star Liatris spicata The linear, grass-like leaves are clumped toward the base of the plant extend up the stem to the showy flower cluster. A tall spike of rayless, rose-purple (sometimes white), closely set flower heads. Common Name: Gayfeather Family: Aster (Asteraceae) Habitat: open sites with dry, sandy soil; fields, thickets, sand dunes Height: 2-5 feet Flower size: tiny flowers in heads 3/4 to 1 inch across Flower color: purple Flowering time: July to September Origin: native Fun Fact: The purple, tufted flower heads are arranged in a long, dense spike bloom which from the top down. The protruding styles give the flower an overall feathery appearance, hence its alternate name, Dense Gayfeather. How to grow : Liatris likes sun and medium moist soil. Propagation: Wait until the flower heads on the entire stalk have turned fluffy tan before collecting seeds. Sow in late fall / early spring. Benefits: Conspicuous Flowers Attracts Birds, Hummingbirds


Download ppt "Blue Vervain Verbena hastata It produces slender flower spikes arranged like a candelabra. The tiny blue or white flowers bloom and die from the bottoms."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google