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NCAA Bylaw 10 Education Session Coaches & Staff SJSU Compliance Office December 9, 10 & 11, 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "NCAA Bylaw 10 Education Session Coaches & Staff SJSU Compliance Office December 9, 10 & 11, 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 NCAA Bylaw 10 Education Session Coaches & Staff SJSU Compliance Office December 9, 10 & 11, 2014

2 Bylaws & 10.3 Sports Wagering

3 1. Which of the following groups are not prohibited from placing bets on NCAA sponsored sports? D. Boosters Bylaw 10.3 prohibits the following individuals from knowingly participating in sports wagering activities and from providing information to individuals involved in or associated with any type of sports wagering activities concerning intercollegiate, amateur or professional athletics competition: a)Staff members of an institution's athletics department; b)Nonathletics department staff members who have responsibilities within or over the athletics department (e.g., chancellor or president, faculty athletics representative, individual to whom athletics reports); c)Staff members of a conference office; and d)Student-athletes.

4 2. If a coach has a friend who is involved in organized gambling activities, it is OK for the coach to give the friend information on his team’s injuries, so long as the friend agrees not to bet on the team. False Per Bylaw 10.3, the coach may not provide information to individuals involved in or associated with any type of sports wagering activities concerning intercollegiate, amateur or professional athletics competition.

5 3. A student-athlete who is found to have placed a bet on a team at his/her institution will be ruled permanently ineligible. True Per Bylaw (a), a student-athlete will permanently lose all remaining eligibility in all sports if he/she: a)Engages in activities designed to influence the outcome of an intercollegiate contest or affect win-loss margins; or b)Participates in any sports wagering activity involving the student-athlete’s institution.

6 4. An SJSU Athletics Department staff member may place bets on San Jose Sharks games. False Per Bylaw , the prohibition against sports wagering applies to any institutional practice or any competition (intercollegiate, amateur or professional) in a sport in which the NCAA conducts championship competition, in bowl subdivision football and in emerging sports for women, regardless of whether the institution sponsors the sport.

7 5. NCAA rules prohibit gambling on sports in which the NCAA does not sponsor a championship, such as Boxing. False Per Bylaw , the prohibition against sports wagering only applies to any institutional practice or competition (intercollegiate, amateur or professional) in a sport in which the NCAA conducts championship competition, in bowl subdivision football and in emerging sports for women.

8 Gambling Violation Example #1 FACTS:  MGF assistant coach (AC) was involved in sports wagering activities on golf practice rounds with student-athletes (SAs). Specifically, on three occasions, AC agreed to a wager of $10 with SAs and on two separate occasions, AC lost bet and paid SAs. AC stated that as a part of team's organized practice activities, he would frequently join current SAs during practice rounds to get a better feel for their games and provide instruction and tips. On a few occasions, a SA challenged AC to put money on a round.  SAs understood it was impermissible under NCAA rules to bet on any NCAA competitions, but given how common these informal wagers are in the sport of golf generally, they never really gave much thought to an informal wager during a practice round of golf.

9 Gambling Violation Example #1, cont’d… Corrective Actions Taken:  Institution required SAs to repay $10 to a charity of their choice.  Both SAs were withheld from first date of competition when team competed in Japan.  Institution suspended AC from all coaching activities for one week, including institution's first competition in Japan.  AC issued a letter of reprimand.  Education session with men's golf team to discuss sports wagering legislation. NCAA Action:  SAs Eligibility reinstated based on institutional action requiring each SA to donate the amount of benefit received ($10) to charity and withholding both SAs from institution's first date of competition.

10 6. Participation in any fantasy league in which an entry fee is required and there is an opportunity to win a prize is a violation of NCAA rules. True Bylaw defines a wager as any agreement in which an individual or entity agrees to give up an item of value (e.g., cash, shirt, dinner) in exchange for the possibility of gaining another item of value (RISK & REWARD test). Examples of sports wagering include the use of a bookmaker or parlay card; Internet sports wagering; auctions in which bids are placed on teams, individuals or contests; and pools or fantasy leagues in which an entry fee is required and there is an opportunity to win a prize.

11 7. An Athletics Department staff member may participate in a radio or television show involving predictions of intercollegiate athletics contests. False Per an 8/24/90 NCAA Staff Interpretation, Athletics Department staff members are precluded from participating in radio or television shows involving point spreads of intercollegiate athletics contests or shows with the primary purpose of predicting outcomes of intercollegiate athletics contests.

12 8. If a coach visits a casino in Nevada, where gambling is legal, the coach can place a bet on a National Football League game. False Per Bylaw , the prohibition against sports wagering applies to any institutional practice or any competition (intercollegiate, amateur or professional) in a sport in which the NCAA conducts championship competition, in bowl subdivision football and in emerging sports for women, regardless of where the betting takes place.

13 9. It is permissible for a coach to have a friendly wager with his/her neighbor on the SJSU-NMSU game because all the winner gets is dinner. False Bylaw defines a wager as any agreement in which an individual or entity agrees to give up an item of value (e.g., cash, shirt, dinner) in exchange for the possibility of gaining another item of value.

14 Gambling Violation Example #2 FACTS:  Assistant Athletic Trainer, Associate AD/Media Relations, Assistant AD/Broadcasting and FAR participated in a fantasy baseball league. The fee to enter the league was $80 and plaques were awarded to the top three finishers at the conclusion of the MLB season.  The staff members mistakenly thought that it was permissible to participate in the league because the league did not award cash prizes and their institution did not sponsor baseball.

15 Gambling Violation Example #2, cont’d… Corrective Actions Taken:  Staff members ceased their participation in the league and were issued letters of admonishment.  The Director of Compliance met with staff members individually to discuss sports wagering legislation.  The Compliance Office further emphasized participation in fantasy leagues as violations of NCAA legislation in its gambling reminders throughout the year.

16 10. Participation in a “Bowl Pool” is permissible since the bowl games are run independently of the NCAA. False Per Bylaw , the prohibition against sports wagering applies to any institutional practice or any competition (intercollegiate, amateur or professional) in a sport in which the NCAA conducts championship competition, in bowl subdivision football and in emerging sports for women.

17 11. It is permissible for student-athletes to play slot machines in Las Vegas. True NCAA sports wagering legislation applies only to those sports in which the NCAA conducts championship competition, in bowl subdivision football and in emerging sports for women; it does not extend to other gambling activities such as poker, slot machines, horse racing, etc... We do not encourage this activity!

18 12. It is permissible to enter a “Streak for the Cash” contest where there is no entry fee but a chance to win a prize. True Bylaw defines a wager as any agreement in which an individual or entity agrees to give up an item of value (e.g., cash, shirt, dinner) in exchange for the possibility of gaining another item of value.

19 13. It is impermissible to place a friendly wager on an NFL game where the loser must change their Facebook profile picture to the opposing team’s logo. False Bylaw defines a wager as any agreement in which an individual or entity agrees to give up an item of value (e.g., cash, shirt, dinner) in exchange for the possibility of gaining another item of value.

20 Gambling Violation Example #3 FACTS: Academic tutor placed three individual bets on three NFL teams for $25, $25 and $50. The tutor did not win any of the bets. The tutor understood college sports wagering was impermissible, but he was unclear whether professional sports wagering was impermissible. The violation was discovered by another tutor who saw the academic tutor’s gambling bet receipts on his Facebook page. Corrective Actions Taken: Tutor was suspended without pay for two weeks. Tutor was required to participate/present to the tutorial staff information regarding sports wagering rules. Rules education conducted and a letter of admonishment issued.

21 14. What is “point-shaving”? C. Engaging in activities designed to affect the win-loss margin of a contest. Point-shaving is a type of match fixing that has been seen numerous times in NCAA sports. In the early 1950’s, point-shaving scandals were discovered that included at least seven NCAA basketball teams, including two defending NCAA champions and the NCAA suspended the Kentucky basketball program for the season.

22 15. While sports wagering is prohibited by NCAA rules, it is not serious enough to cause the suspension of a team. False In 1985, five Tulane basketball players were accused of point-shaving in multiple games. Tulane suspended its basketball program for four seasons (85-86 through 88-89) because of the allegations.

23 Bylaw 10.1 Unethical Conduct

24 16. Withholding information relevant to an internal investigation of alleged NCAA rules violations is considered unethical conduct. True Bylaw 10.1(a) defines unethical conduct as refusal to furnish information relevant to an investigation of a possible violation of an NCAA regulation when requested to do so by the NCAA or the individual's institution.

25 17. An academic advisor is permitted to meet with a professor to negotiate a student-athlete’s grade in the professor’s class. False Bylaw 10.1(b) defines unethical conduct as knowing involvement in arranging for fraudulent academic credit or false transcripts for a prospect or an enrolled student-athlete.

26 Unethical Conduct Violation #1 FACTS: Prior to September 1, 2011, a football student-athlete (SA) was not eligible to compete due to not meeting progress-toward-degree requirements. On September 2, 2011, institution received information of a grade change in one of SA's classes, and certified him eligible to compete. When SA was traveling to an away contest, it was determined that someone had forged the professor's signature on the grade change form. The violation was discovered when Associate AD/Academics became suspicious as to how SA received a grade change and contacted SA's professor to inquire about the change. The professor stated he had not signed a grade change for SA.

27 Unethical Conduct Violation #1, cont’d… Corrective Actions: SA was declared ineligible for practice and competition and removed from the football program. Monetary fines put in place for SAs who falsify documents to certify eligibility. SA required to repay cost of trip to away contest. Institutional actions applied but not disclosed.

28 18. If an assistant coach fails to disclose information relevant to an investigation of a potential rules violation at the request of his/her head coach, both the head and assistant coach are in violation of ethical conduct legislation. True Bylaw 10.1(d) prohibits knowingly furnishing or influencing others to furnish the NCAA or the individual's institution false or misleading information concerning an individual's involvement in or knowledge of matters relevant to a possible violation of an NCAA regulation.

29 19. A sport’s Director of Operations is permitted to accept payment from a sports agent for arranging meetings with current student-athletes. False Bylaw 10.1(e) prohibits the receipt of benefits by an institutional staff member for facilitating or arranging a meeting between a student- athlete and an agent, financial advisor or a representative of an agent or advisor (e.g., "runner").

30 20. A coach may provide penicillin to a student- athlete who is sick and unable to practice. False Bylaw 10.1(f) defines unethical conduct as knowing involvement in providing a banned substance or impermissible supplement to student-athletes, or knowingly providing medications to student-athletes contrary to medical licensure, commonly accepted standards of care in sports medicine practice, or state and federal law.

31 21. When completing the SJSU admissions application, a prospect is not required to list all schools he/she attended. False Bylaw 10.1(g) defines unethical conduct as failure to provide complete and accurate information to the NCAA, the NCAA Eligibility Center or an institution's admissions office regarding an individual's academic record (e.g., schools attended, completion of coursework, grades and test scores).

32 Unethical Conduct Violation #2 FACTS: Head coach required weight-lifting and other conditioning activities on the weekly day off from practice, and falsified practice time sheets. Corrective Actions: Terminated head coach and adjusted remainder of practice schedule to ensure a weekly day off from practice.

33 22. If a staff member provides a prospect with answers to the ELM/EPT, he/she has engaged in unethical conduct. True Bylaw 10.1(h) defines unethical conduct as fraudulence or misconduct in connection with entrance or placement examinations.

34 23. A student-athlete who uses her younger sister’s identity to extend her NCAA eligibility has engaged in unethical conduct. True Bylaw 10.1(i) defines unethical conduct as engaging in any athletics competition under an assumed name or with intent to otherwise deceive.

35 24. A coach may help an international prospect by providing her with answers to the NCAA amateur questionnaire. False Bylaw 10.1(j) defines unethical conduct as failure to provide complete and accurate information to the NCAA, the NCAA Eligibility Center or the institution's athletics department regarding an individual's amateur status.

36 Unethical Conduct Violation #3 FACTS: A women's soccer student-athlete (SA) took a course for a softball SA. The women's soccer SA attended the course pretending to be the softball SA and completed all of the required coursework and took the exams as the softball SA. Several members of the women's soccer and softball teams knew about the arrangement but did not report it to the proper university officials.

37 Unethical Conduct Violation #3, cont’d… Corrective Actions: Both SAs were declared ineligible and suspended from their respective sports indefinitely. The Athletics Department disassociated itself from both SAs and did not seek reinstatement of eligibility for either SA. Both SAs were suspended from the institution for two semesters.


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