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Start here >> Network IQ Training Manual Chapter 4 - Fibre Optic Hardware.

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Presentation on theme: "Start here >> Network IQ Training Manual Chapter 4 - Fibre Optic Hardware."— Presentation transcript:

1 Start here >> Network IQ Training Manual Chapter 4 - Fibre Optic Hardware

2 2 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Fibre Optic Hardware Common Hardware Selection Purpose of Hardware Location of Hardware Fibre Count Environmental considerations Common Termination Solutions Pigtail Splicing Field Installed connectors Pre-terminated cable assemblies Recommended Installation Practices Termination Method Cable Management Routing within the cabinet Summary

3 3 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Purpose of Hardware Fibre optic hardware is used to: Provide protection to fibre terminations and/or splices Provide a location where patching and Moves, Adds and Changes (MACs) can take place Provide an end point to cables for testing purposes Intelligent patching actively monitors physical layer connections

4 4 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Direct Termination Hardware with Splice Option Fibre Count Capacity of the hardware should match the fibre count of the cables being terminated Capacity of a product is dictated by: –number of ports on the patching field –number of splices in the splice trays –number and size of cables (accessories for grounding and strain relieving) Fiber Count is 72 Fiber Count is 288

5 5 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Different Choices from small to DataCentre Data Centre Equipment – High Density in 1U – 4U up to over 3000 ports in 4U Local Area Network Hardware with low to medium density 24 – 288 fibre ports

6 6 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Wall mountable hardwareFloor mountable hardware Location of Hardware Hardware can be installed in a number of different locations –Inside a rack or cabinet –On a bare wall –Fitted into a wall mounted raceway or conduit –Fitted under a raised floor –Environment: indoor, outdoor, industrial Rack mountable hardware

7 7 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Environmental considerations Ingress Protection (IP) Rating Is the hardware installed inside or outside? –Externally mounted hardware should be water tight Ingress Protection requirements –Defined in EN –e.g. IP67 = ingress protection from dust and can be placed short-term under water IP 69K defined in German DIN high-pressure (80-100bar) and steam (80°C) cleaning In US: NEMA rating (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) 1 st Digit: Solid object Protection 2 nd Digit: Moisture Protection 0No protection0No Protection 1Protected against solid objects > 50mm 1Protected against dripping 2Protected against solid objects > 12mm 2Protected against dripping water when tilited < 15° 3Protected against solid objects > 2.5mm 3Protected against spraying water 4Protected against solid objects > 1.0mm 4Protected against splashing water 5Dust protection5Protected against water jets 6Dust tight6Protected against heavy seas EN does not address risk of explosion or moisture condition e.g. caused by condensation, corrosive vapor, fungus, insects 7Protected against immersion 8Protected against submersion

8 8 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Installation Recommendations Routing of cable to hardware Slack storage and management Cable Management Installation of cable into hardware –Pre-terminated cable installation –Field terminated cable installation

9 9 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Routing of Cable to Hardware Adequate containment for the cables should be provided either overhead or under the raised floor Power, fibre and copper cables are usually kept separated Containment can either be a solid plastic structure which fits together to create a pathway….. …or can be a metal mesh framework that can be cut and shaped to create the pathway

10 10 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Slack Storage and Management Service loops should always be provided on the network Service loops allow the installer to: Work at a convenient location Reconfigure or move the hardware if required Re-terminate the cable in the event of errors Service loops should be: About 1.5m long In or under the server cabinet At every third floor in the building riser Where the main incoming cable enters the building If possible, service loops should be stored on the containment on dedicated tray work

11 11 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Cable Management Most important sellable feature of optical hardware Where end-user interface occurs Helps to maintain fiber radius Aids the overall management of the physical layer in the closet

12 12 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Cable Management from this….

13 13 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help …to this structure

14 14 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Cable entry using PG glandHardware specific strain relief Installation of Cables into Hardware Cable entry into the hardware is through either a cable gland or a slot in the hardware. Number, size and type of cable must be taken into account when choosing the hardware. Cables should be strain relieved to prevent damage to the exposed fibres should the cable be pulled. Provide strain relief accessories for all cable to be terminated Armoured cables requires grounding features and accessories

15 15 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Installation of Cables into Hardware

16 16 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Termination Methods There are three ways of terminating fibres within a piece of hardware Pigtail Splicing Accessories are required to house the splices Hardware should have the provision to hold the splice trays Hardware must have space to store cable or buffer tube slack Direct-/ Field termination Hardware must have space to store 900µm fibres or buffer tube fan out kits No additional accessories (eg. Splice trays) are required Pre-terminated cables Hardware must have a slotted cable entry feature (not glanded) Hardware must have space to store cable leg length

17 17 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Pigtail Splicing Field cables prepared and mounted in rear of panel; field fibres routed to splice cassettes Pigtail fibres prepared and routed to splice cassettes Splice cassettes selected with correct organizers: Heat shrink fusion protector Crimp fusion protector Mechanical splice Patching area (adapters) and pigtails Select connector style and fibre type

18 18 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Direct Termination Once cables are strain relieved, they can be stripped back to expose the fibres. Field installable connectors are then fitted and plugged into the adaptors. Loose tube cables require furcation tubing

19 19 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Pre-terminated, Modular System: Plug & Play/EDGE Saves Installation Time Factory Tested Consists of 3 modular components 1.Trunk –Small diameter, high fibre count (up to 144f) –Pulling grip protects connectors to 45Kg 2.Harness –Break out MTP connector for direct attach to actives 3.Module –Break out MTP connector to preferred single-fibre connector at patch panel

20 20 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Installation of pre-terminated Cables into Hardware Furcation of pre-terminated cables requires “epoxy plug” Epoxy plug is typically strain-relief point of cable Hardware should have easy-to-install solutions for epoxy plug

21 21 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Closures Choice of closure determined by: Mounting Capacity Mid-span possibility Type of cables (accessories) Mounting: Direct buried/handhole Aerial Pole/wall (manhole) mounting Capacity determined by Number of splices Type of splice protectors Number and size of cables Number of buffer tubes Type of cables: Armoured (grounding features + grounding kits) Direct buried (in-line) Handhole (in-line) (dome) Aerial (in-line) Pole mounting (dome) Splice capacity: ≤ 168 (heat-shrink or crimp) Cables # ≤ 4; Ø ≤ 21 mm Buffer tubes ≤ 28 per side

22 22 © Corning Incorporated 2014 Network IQ Programme Resources | Glossary | Help Summary - Fibre Optic Hardware Mounting Options Wall Floor Rack Termination Options Pigtail Splicing Direct Termination Pre-terminated Important Considerations During Installation Strain-relief of cable Proper fibre/cable routing Slack storage Environmental protection Closures Special Solutions (see Reference pages) Intelligent Hardware High Density

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