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How to change the world and eat for free at the same time…

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Presentation on theme: "How to change the world and eat for free at the same time…"— Presentation transcript:

1 How to change the world and eat for free at the same time…

2 (Or: direct action… the art of doing it yourself)

3 A few quick facts… 96 billion pounds of usable food are thrown away in the US every year!

4 That’s 27% of all the food we produce. A third of that waste is fresh produce, milk, grains, and other fairly unprocessed goods. The US produces roughly 3800 calories per person per day. Which means (drum roll please) we throw away enough food to feed almost half of America every day! 91 billion of those pounds are tossed by consumers (that’s us!)

5 But about 5 billion pounds is thrown out by retailers like the supermarket this produce used to belong to!

6 At the same time, 35.5 million Americans experience hunger or food insecurity every year That’s four percent of all American households Which includes 12.6 million children

7 At the same time, 35.5 million Americans experience hunger or food insecurity every year That’s four percent of all American households Which includes 12.6 million children So…

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9 Food Not Bombs…

10 Sundays, 5pm, Occidental Park see for more information Food Not Bombs…

11 ?v=5F8_KE00aco

12 Police and Food Not Bombs in Occidental Park a few weeks prior

13 Official instructions from Seattle Parks and Recreation

14 A question, then: why restrict the sharing of food in public spaces?

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16 Legal Definition: “homelessness” (from title 42, Chapter 119, Subchapter I) …the term “homeless” or “homeless individual or homeless person” includes— 1. an individual who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence; and 2. an individual who has a primary nighttime residence that is — A. a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designed to provide temporary living accommodations (including welfare hotels, congregate shelters, and transitional housing for the mentally ill); B. an institution that provides a temporary residence for individuals intended to be institutionalized; or C. a public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings.

17 (toolbox break:) Essentialism: “the view that things and people have some inherent essence, or characteristic an quality, that defines them…” (from the glossary on the course web site.)

18 Homelessness in America:

19 Nationally: Approx. 750,000 homeless on a given night

20 Homelessness in America: Nationally: Approx. 750,000 homeless on a given night Seattle: 1999: : : : : : : no report 2006: : : 8439

21 Homelessness in America: Nationally: Approx. 750,000 homeless on a given night Seattle: 1999: : : : : : : no report 2006: : : 8439

22 Homelessness in America:

23 A (really really) brief history of the last thirty years or so…

24 Homelessness in America: A (really really) brief history of the last thirty years or so… Economic restructuring: (service sector vs. manufacturing sector)

25 Homelessness in America: A (really really) brief history of the last thirty years or so… Economic restructuring: (service sector vs. manufacturing sector) Housing speculation

26 Homelessness in America: A (really really) brief history of the last thirty years or so… Economic restructuring: (service sector vs. manufacturing sector) Housing speculation The shrinking safety net (‘welfare reform’ etc.)

27 national trends in food-sharing restrictions “Cities use a wide variety of ordinances, policies, and tactics to discourage individuals and groups from sharing food with homeless and other poor persons. Over the past year and a half: “The Las Vegas city council passed an ordinance that bans the providing of food or meals to the indigent for free or for a nominal fee in city parks. “The City of Wilmington, N.C., passed an ordinance that prohibits the sharing of food on city streets and sidewalks. “The Orlando, Fla., city council passed an ordinance that prohibits sharing food with more than 25 people in city parks without a permit and limits groups to doing so to two times a year. “In Orlando, police arrested a man who served food to 30 people in a public park for violating a city ordinance that prohibits sharing food with more than 25 people without a permit. He faced a penalty of up to a $500 fine and 60 days in jail for violating this law. “In Dallas, anyone caught sharing food with a homeless person without a permit may be fined up to $2,000 and/or jailed for up to six months.” (National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty)

28 (toolbox break: biopower) Definition: control of the social body achieved through control of the physical body.

29 Biopower and ‘Civility’ In Seattle, the ‘civility laws,’ passed by the city council in 1993, prohibit, among other things: Sitting on public sidewalks between 9am and 7pm Public urination(!) Sleeping in public parks after 11pm

30 Got shelter? Last year, Seattle began ‘sweeping’ the greenbelt, confiscating tents, blankets, and other items found in local parks, asserting that people sleeping there were a health hazard to “the public,” (i.e. “the social body”) Biopower, Shelter, and ‘the sweeps’

31 (toolbox break:) The “ exception ”: that part of a social or cultural system which is included as an exclusion.

32 (toolbox break:) The “ exception ”: that part of a social or cultural system which is included as an exclusion. (… as in, ‘the exception that proves the rule.’)

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