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Meeting the Educational Needs of Homeless Children and Youth: All Working Together Alabama School Transportation Association (ASTA) June 10, 2009 1.

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Presentation on theme: "Meeting the Educational Needs of Homeless Children and Youth: All Working Together Alabama School Transportation Association (ASTA) June 10, 2009 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Meeting the Educational Needs of Homeless Children and Youth: All Working Together Alabama School Transportation Association (ASTA) June 10,

2 How many children experience homelessness? 1.35 million children 1.35 million children 10% of all children living in poverty 10% of all children living in poverty 733, million youths 733, million youths Over 40% of all children who are homeless are under the age of 5 Over 40% of all children who are homeless are under the age of 5 11,687 reported enrolled in Alabama ( Data) 11,687 reported enrolled in Alabama ( Data) 11,973 reported March, ,973 reported March, 2009 Where do most of the homeless students live in Alabama? 2

3 Where do homeless children live? Doubled-up is the #1 place where Alabama’s homeless students live 3

4 Educational barriers Lack of school stability and educational continuity Lack of school stability and educational continuity Stress, hunger, fatigue Stress, hunger, fatigue Enrollment requirements (school records, immunizations, proof of residence and guardianship) Enrollment requirements (school records, immunizations, proof of residence and guardianship) Lack of access to programs Lack of access to programs Lack of transportation Lack of transportation Lack of school supplies, clothing, etc. Lack of school supplies, clothing, etc. Prejudice and misunderstanding Prejudice and misunderstanding 4

5 McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act Ensures educational rights and protections for children and youth experiencing homelessness. Designed to address the problems that homeless children and youth face in enrolling, attending, and succeeding in school.

6 McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act Reauthorized in 2001 as Title X, Part C of NCLB Main themes: Main themes: School access School access School stability School stability Support for academic success Support for academic success Child-centered, best interest decision making Child-centered, best interest decision making Critical role of the local homeless liaison Critical role of the local homeless liaison 6

7 Who is Covered? Children who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence— – Sharing the housing of others due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or similar reason (doubled-up) – Living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, camping grounds due to lack of adequate alternative accommodations – Living in emergency or transitional shelters – Abandoned in hospitals 7

8 Who is Covered? (cont.) Who is Covered? (cont.) – Awaiting foster care placement – Living in a public or private place not designed for humans to live – Living in cars, parks, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations, etc. – Migratory children living in above circumstances – Unaccompanied youth who are experiencing the above circumstances Case-by-case determination … 8

9 Where can homeless children attend school ? Children and youth experiencing homelessness can, according to their best interest: enroll in any public school that students living in the same attendance area are eligible to attend enroll in any public school that students living in the same attendance area are eligible to attend stay in their school of origin stay in their school of origin School of origin — school attended when permanently housed or in which last enrolled 9

10 School Stability Best interest — keep homeless students in their school of origin, to the extent feasible, unless this is against the parents’ or guardians’ wishes 10

11 Feasibility— USDE Sample Criteria Feasibility criteria focus on the best interest of the student Continuity of instruction Continuity of instruction Age of the child or youth Age of the child or youth Safety of the child or youth Safety of the child or youth Length of stay at the shelter Length of stay at the shelter Likely area where family will find permanent housing Likely area where family will find permanent housing Student’s need for special instructional programs Student’s need for special instructional programs Impact of commute on education Impact of commute on education School placement of siblings School placement of siblings Time remaining in the school year Time remaining in the school year 2004 Non-Regulatory Guidance, p.14 11

12 School Selection Students can stay in their school of origin the entire time they are homeless, and until the end of any academic year in which they move into permanent housing Students can stay in their school of origin the entire time they are homeless, and until the end of any academic year in which they move into permanent housing If a student becomes homeless in between academic years, he or she may continue in the school of origin for the following academic year If a student becomes homeless in between academic years, he or she may continue in the school of origin for the following academic year If a student is sent to a school other than that requested by a parent or guardian, the district must provide a written explanation to the parent or guardian of its decision and the right to appeal If a student is sent to a school other than that requested by a parent or guardian, the district must provide a written explanation to the parent or guardian of its decision and the right to appeal 12

13 Transportation LEAs must provide homeless students with transportation to and from their school of origin, at a parent’s or guardian’s request (or at the liaison’s request for unaccompanied youth) LEAs must provide homeless students with transportation to and from their school of origin, at a parent’s or guardian’s request (or at the liaison’s request for unaccompanied youth) If the student’s temporary residence and the school of origin are in the same LEA, that LEA must provide or arrange transportation If the student’s temporary residence and the school of origin are in the same LEA, that LEA must provide or arrange transportation If the student is living outside of the school of origin’s LEA, the LEA where the student is living and the school of origin’s LEA must determine how to divide the responsibility and cost, or they must share the responsibility and cost equally If the student is living outside of the school of origin’s LEA, the LEA where the student is living and the school of origin’s LEA must determine how to divide the responsibility and cost, or they must share the responsibility and cost equally 13

14 Transportation (cont.) In addition to providing transportation to the school of origin, LEAs must provide students in homeless situations with transportation services comparable to those provided to other students In addition to providing transportation to the school of origin, LEAs must provide students in homeless situations with transportation services comparable to those provided to other students School districts must eliminate barriers to the school enrollment and retention of students experiencing homelessness (including transportation barriers) transportation barriers) 14

15 Title I and Homelessness Homeless children and youth are automatically eligible for Title IA services Homeless children and youth are automatically eligible for Title IA services Title I programs must reserve (set aside) funds to serve homeless students Title I programs must reserve (set aside) funds to serve homeless students Services not ordinarily provided to Title I students can be offered to homeless students if those services are not available from other sources Services not ordinarily provided to Title I students can be offered to homeless students if those services are not available from other sources Title I funds cannot be used for transportation to the school of origin but can be used for other transportation needs Title I funds cannot be used for transportation to the school of origin but can be used for other transportation needs 15

16 May funds under Part A of Title I or Part A of Title V be used to transport homeless students to and from the school of origin? No, LEAs may not use these funds under Title I, Part A or Title V, Part A to transport homeless student to and from school of origin. Transportation services to the school of origin are mandated under the MV Act’s statute. The “no-supplanting” provisions in Title I and Title V prohibit those funds from being used to support activities that the LEA would otherwise be required to provide. Guidance, p. 21, H-3 16

17 McKinney – Vento Grant One of the allowable activities that McKinney-Vento Grant money may be used is “Paying excess cost of transportation not otherwise provided through Federal, State, or local funds” This past school year Alabama had 35 school districts with a McKinney-Vento Grant McKinney-Vento Grant is an annual competitive Grant McKinney-Vento ARRA Grant also allows for this activity, but must be certain it is “excess cost” not otherwise provided through Federal, State, or local funds

18 Transportation Strategies Collaborate with local public agencies and service providers to develop transportation plans or provide transportation. Take advantage of transportation systems used by public assistance agencies. Provide passes for public transportation, including passes for caregivers when necessary. Obtain corporate or other sponsorship for transportation costs. (NCHE brief on Transportation)

19 Collaboration Collaboration among the Federal Programs Coordinator, Homeless Liaison, and Transportation Department is essential in providing the best educational services that EVERY student deserves. THANK YOU for all that you do for our students!

20 Have A Great Summer! Beth Thompson or


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