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To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel [1650] Coy: Affectedly and usually flirtatiously shy or modest. To allure; to entice; to decoy. Playing hard to get.

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Presentation on theme: "To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel [1650] Coy: Affectedly and usually flirtatiously shy or modest. To allure; to entice; to decoy. Playing hard to get."— Presentation transcript:

1 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel [1650] Coy: Affectedly and usually flirtatiously shy or modest. To allure; to entice; to decoy. Playing hard to get.

2 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Starter Write about a time on holiday when you successfully or unsuccessfully tried to ‘chat up’ a girl. Think about what worked in your conversation or why you might have failed. (If you have not been in this position use your imagination or write about a friend’s experience.)

3 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Learning Objectives As we study this poem you will learn about: The story of the poem The term ’carpe diem’. More about the terms, Metaphor: Tone: Imagery. You will also complete some mini tasks, a test and an assignment on the poem.

4 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Assignment To His Coy Mistress is known as a ‘Carpe diem’ poem where the man is trying to persuade the woman to his point of view. In Macbeth Act 1 Sc7 we have the opposite situation as Lady Macbeth tries to persuade her husband to kill the king and seize the throne. In your assignment discuss and compare the methods these two characters use to try to get their own way and ‘seize the day.’ words by Thursday 27 Feb. Hwk: For Sunday 2 nd Feb – Who was Andrew Marvel and what was unusual about the publication of this poem?

5 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart. For, Lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate. But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace. Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run. To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 1 What is the three part structure of the Poem?

6 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart. For, Lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate. But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace. Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run. To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 1 What is the tree part structure of the Poem? If (Had), But, Therefore. Mini Task 2 What form does the poem take?

7 Had we but world enough, and time, But at my back I always hear Now therefore, while the youthful hue To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 2 What form does the poem take? The form of the poem is an argument. Argument: In logic and philosophy, an argument is an attempt to persuade someone of something, by giving reasons for accepting a particular conclusion as evident. Mini Task 3 Sum up the three main points in the argument the man makes.

8 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 3 Sum up the three main points in the argument the man makes. 1.If we had all the time in the world I would have time enough to make you fall in love with me. 2.But we don’t have all the time in the world, not even all the time in our lifetime. 3.So let me seduce you now!

9 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel The Story of the Poem This is the best recognized ’carpe diem’ (seize the day) poem in English Literature. In the poem, the speaker addresses a woman who has been slow to respond to his sexual advances. In the first stanza he describes how he would love her if he were to be unencumbered by the constraints of a normal lifespan. He could spend centuries admiring each part of her body and her resistance to his advances, that is her coyness, would not discourage him. In the second stanza, he laments how short human life is. Once life is over, the speaker contends, the opportunity to enjoy one another is gone, as no one embraces in death. In the last stanza, the speaker urges the woman to accept his advances, and argues that in loving one another with passion they will both make the most of the brief time they have to live Mini Task 4 :- Summarise the story of the poem.

10 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel The Structure of the Poem Mini Task 5 :- How is the poem structured?

11 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel The Structure of the Poem Mini Task 5 :- How is the poem structured ? The poem’s structure is 3 uneven stanzas: of 20, 12 & 14 lines. Each line has 8 syllables. It is written in rhyming couplets, which is one of its Key Features. These structural features help to give the poem a strong rhythm. Mini Task 6 What are the poem’s other Key Features?

12 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel The Structure of the Poem – Key Features Mini Task 6 What are the poem’s other Key Features? Alliteration Imagery Metaphor Simile Mini Task 7 On your copy of the poem, find and mark up as many examples of alliteration as you can.

13 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart For, Lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate. But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace. Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run. Mini Task 7 : Key Features - Alliteration.

14 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Key Features – Imagery Mini Task 8 - Imagery. From each stanza 1.select one image you find interesting 2.Explain why you have selected that image.

15 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Key Features – Imagery Mini Task 8 From each stanza 1.select one image you find interesting 2.Explain why you have selected that image. Principal Imagery Stanza 1 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart. For, Lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate. Ganges: Great river of the plains of northern India Humber: a large tidal estuary on the east coast of Northern England

16 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Key Features – Imagery Mini Task 8 From each stanza 1.select one image you find interesting 2.Explain why you have selected that image. Principal Imagery Stanza 2 But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace. There are examples of imagery in every line of Stanza 2, some of which are examples of sensory imagery others are sexual imagery.

17 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Key Features – Imagery Mini Task 8 From each stanza 1.select one image you find interesting Principal Imagery Stanza 3 Again there are examples of imagery in every line of Stanza 2, many of which are violent, sexual images. Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run. Languish: be forced to remain in an unpleasant place or situation. Strife: angry or bitter disagreement over fundamental issues; conflict.

18 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Key Features – Metaphor Mini Task 9 From each stanza 1.Select one Metaphor you find interesting 2.Explain what you think that metaphor means.

19 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Key Features – Metaphor Mini Task 9 From each stanza 1.Select one Metaphor you find interesting 2.Explain what you think that metaphor means. Stanza 1 Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; Stanza 2 Time's winged chariot hurrying near; Deserts of vast eternity. And your quaint honour But none, I think, do there embrace. Stanza 3 ….youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

20 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Key Features – Simile Mini Task 10 From each stanza 1.Select one Simile from Stanza 3 you find interesting 2.Explain what you think that simile means. Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

21 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Key Features – Simile Mini Task 10 From each stanza 1.Select one Simile from Stanza 3 you find interesting 2.Explain what you think that simile means. Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

22 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 11 In look at the first two lines of the poem again write down what you think they mean. Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1

23 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 11 In look at the first two lines of the poem again write down what you think they mean. If we had all the time in the world, it would be OK(no crime) for you to play hard to get and we could take all the time we want….. Mini Task 12 Time ….to do what? Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1

24 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 12 ….to do what? Get to know each other and truly fall in love. ….and…. For me to seduce you! Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime Deserts of vast eternity. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1

25 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 13 What is the ‘tone’ of the second couplet? What are the words that help determine this tone? Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Deserts of vast eternity. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1

26 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 13 What is the ‘tone’ of the second couplet? Romantic What are the words that help determine this tone? long love’s day Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Deserts of vast eternity. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1

27 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 14 What is the principal imagery of theses 4 lines? Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, Deserts of vast eternity. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1

28 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 14 What is the principal imagery of theses 4 lines? Water – 2 rivers and a flood Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, Deserts of vast eternity. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1

29 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 15 Why use ‘the conversion of Jews’ as a measure of time? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews.

30 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 15 Why use ‘the conversion of Jews’ as a measure of time? So what does the metaphor mean? Look at the whole stanza up to this point. How long will his love last? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews.

31 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 15 Why use ‘the conversion of Jews’ as a measure of time? Because it will never happen So what does the metaphor mean? She could refuse his advances until the end of time and he would still love her. Look at the whole stanza up to this point. How long will his love last? For all eternity – since before the Biblical flood until the end of days. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews.

32 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 16 This is the most controversial and talked about couplet in the poem. Our modern interpretation of the metaphor is probably quite different to Andrew Marvel’s when he wrote the poem in What are these two interpretations likely to be? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow;

33 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 16 1.The traditional interpretation is that his love would grow slowly and steadily, like a forest spreading out over a landscape. This reflects the sense of eternal time established in the previous few lines. 2.A more modern reading sees the ‘vegetables’ as a phallic symbol and the metaphor as much more sexual. This interpretation leads us away from romance and on to the more sexual language used later in the poem. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow;

34 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 17 What do you notice about the direction of travel of the imagery in these lines? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart.

35 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 17 What do you notice about the direction of travel of the imagery in these lines? Down….to the ‘rest’ and then into her heart. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart.

36 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 18 What is wrong with the last 2 lines of the stanza. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart. For, Lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate.

37 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 18 What is wrong with the last 2 lines of the stanza. It is a lie or at the very least hyperbolic flattery! He flatters her by telling her she deserves eternal courtship and that he would not want to speed the courtship up to a higher rate. But you will discover in the next two stanzas his true intentions. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 1 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart. For, Lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate.

38 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 19 What is the Key Word in the opening line of Stanza 2? What type of poetic device is ‘Time's ‘wingèd chariot ‘? What has happened to pace/tone in this stanza? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 2 But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.

39 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 19 What is the Key Word in the opening line of Stanza 2? ‘But’… and it undoes all the romantic flattery of Stanza 1. What type of poetic device is ‘Time's ‘wingèd chariot ‘? Personification…time is not human and does not have a chariot! What has happened to pace/tone in this stanza? It becomes slightly faster and more urgent. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 2 But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.

40 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 20 What has happened to ‘eternity in these two lines? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 2 But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.

41 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 20 What has happened to ‘eternity in these two lines? Suddenly it is not something to look forward to, it is now a vast ‘desert’ going on forever. 30,000 years doesn't seem so appealing anymore! The Poem In Detail - Stanza 2 But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.

42 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 21 Where are the characters now? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 2 But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.

43 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 21 Where are the characters now? Dead and buried in a marble tomb, never to see each other again. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 2 But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.

44 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 22 What is the Key Word in these lines? What point is the man trying to make here? What is the word that shows he is patronising his lady-love? Why does the ‘honour turn to dust? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 2 But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.

45 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 22 What is the Key Word in these lines? ‘Virginity.’ What point is the man trying to make here? There is no point in keeping your virginity because you could die tomorrow and you would die without consummating our relationship. What is the word that shows he is patronising his lady-love? ‘quaint’ Why does the ‘honour turn to dust? It will rot away, just like her body. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 2 But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace. Quaint: Charmingly odd, especially in an old-fashioned way. So he’s calling her desire to retain her modesty and her morals, ‘old fashioned’….remember this was written in 1650 and this attitude seems very ‘modern’ to me!

46 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 23 What is the significance of this line? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 2 But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.

47 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 23 What is the significance of this line? It is the core of the poem. It is what the poem is all about. The poet makes this seem like a Love poem by using lots of ‘flowery,’ romantic, expressions in Stanza 1. All he is trying to do is talk this lady into bed. He gives himself away here as he could just as easily said ‘ashes all my love’, but he chooses not to. So this then, is a LUST poem, not a LOVE poem! The Poem In Detail - Stanza 2 But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.

48 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 24 What are the Key Words in these lines? What point is the man trying to make here? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 2 But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.

49 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 24 What are the Key Words in these lines? Grave & Embrace What point is the man trying to make here? You can’t be deader than dead and when you are dead you have no one to cuddle up to as you lie dead, cold and alone in your grave……but, on the other hand, there's always me, here, now! The Poem In Detail - Stanza 2 But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.

50 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 25 What is the significance of ‘therefore’? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

51 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 25 What is the significance of ‘therefore’? This is the final phase in an Aristotelian/Logical argument. For this classical form you need two premises and one conclusion to form the basic argumentative structure. Premise 1 + Premise 2, therefore = Logical conclusion ex. All men die. Ahmed is a man. Therefore Ahmed will die. So the argument in the poem goes ‘Had we all the time in the world…… but we don’t have all the time in the world…..Therefore….. [Mini Task 26] Therefore….What? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

52 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 26 Therefore….What ? You must let me seduce you now while we are young and beautiful and there is still time! The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

53 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 26 Therefore….. What ? You must let me seduce you now while we are young and beautiful and there is still time! The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

54 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 27 What is the significance of ‘morning dew’? Like youth [youthful hue], it is temporary and doesn't’ last. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

55 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 28 Explain the metaphor in these two lines. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

56 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 28 Explain the metaphor in these two lines. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run. Transpired: Become know; happened. If it transpires that something has happened, this previously secret or unknown fact becomes known:

57 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 28 Explain the metaphor in these two lines. He now assumes she is or has always been willing to be seduced and it ‘transpired’ that that truth was hidden….in other words she has been playing ‘hard to get’ or been ‘coy’! Not only is she ‘willing’ but her hidden desire is so powerful it is escaping from every ‘pore’ almost as though she is on ‘fire.’ The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run. Transpired: Become know; something has happened, was previously secret or unknown becomes known: ex. It transpired that Manchester United suffered after Alex Ferguson retired.

58 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 29 Explain what ‘sport’ means. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

59 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 29 Explain what ‘sport’ means. A sexual liaison which he now treats as a game. Note there is no reference to ‘love’ anymore, this is just a physical, sexual act. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

60 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 30 What is wrong with the ‘amorous birds of prey’ simile? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

61 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 30 What is wrong with the ‘amorous birds of prey’ simile? We do not usually connect birds of prey with romantic allusions. They are vicious and violent creatures that hunt smaller weaker prey, as he perhaps has hunted her? Normally we associate Doves or Bluebirds with love so what the poet is suggesting here is that any physical union between this couple will be ‘violent’ [not gentle and romantic], and this takes us back to the urgent need to satisfy the ‘fire’ of their desire. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run. Allusion: an expression designed to call something to mind without mentioning it explicitly; an indirect or passing reference:

62 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 31 Explain this metaphor. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run. Languish: lose or lack vitality; grow weak; be forced to remain in an unpleasant place or situation.

63 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 31 Explain this metaphor. Our lives are eaten away by time, here the man is trying to reverse this by ‘devouring’ Time. "slow-chapped power" means "slowly devouring jaws“ so here he is saying that a sexual liaison would mean they could escape death’s jaws, if only for a moment. In other words do not waste another minute as slaves to Time, but to give Time itself a run for its money. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run. Languish: lose or lack vitality; grow weak; be forced to remain in an unpleasant place or situation.

64 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 32 What is the image that is being presented in this couplet? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

65 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 32 What is the image that is being presented in this couplet? A sexual union as the couple embrace. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

66 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 33 What might ‘tearing pleasures‘ be an allusion to? What does ‘rough strife’ echo? What are the ‘iron gates of life’? The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

67 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 33 What might tearing pleasures be an allusion to? The tearing processes involved when a girl loses her virginity. What does ‘rough strife’ echo? ‘sport’ referred to earlier. What are the ‘iron gates of life’? A woman’s pelvis, which of course contains the birth canal. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

68 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 34 Explain the final metaphor. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

69 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 34 Explain the final metaphor. If the sun stands still, then time stands still, so by agreeing to enter a sexual relationship with him, the poet is saying that though they may not be able to stop Time, they can give him a good run for his money or at the very least freeze this moment of pleasure in time forever. The Poem In Detail - Stanza 3 Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

70 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel The metaphysical poets is a term used to describe a loose group of British lyric poets of the 17th century [ ], whose work challenged the conventions of their day by speculating about topics such as love or religion so that the reader is startled out of his complacency and forced to think through the argument of the poem. The Poem In Context - Metaphysical poetry Mini Task 35 Summarise this slide.

71 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Andrew Marvell, (born March 31, died Aug. 18, English poet whose political reputation overshadowed that of his poetry until the 20th century. He is now considered to be one of the best Metaphysical poets. Born in 1621, Marvell grew up in the Yorkshire town of Hull where his father, Reverend Andrew Marvell, was a lecturer at Holy Trinity Church and master of the Charterhouse. At age twelve Marvell began his studies at Trinity College, Cambridge. Four years later two of Marvell's poems, one in Latin and one in Greek, were published in an anthology of Cambridge poets. After receiving his B.A. in 1639, Marvell stayed on at Trinity, apparently to complete an M.A. degree. In 1641, however, his father drowned in the Hull estuary and Marvell abandoned his studies. During the 1640's Marvell traveled extensively on the Continent, adding Dutch, French, Spanish, and Italian, to his Latin and Greek—missing the English civil wars entirely. The Poem In Context – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 36 Summarise this slide.

72 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Marvell spent most of the 1650's working as a tutor. Elected to Parliament in 1660 he became a well-known politician and held office in Cromwell's government. He represented Hull to Parliament during the Restoration of King Charles II to the throne. His very public position, in a time of tremendous political turmoil and upheaval, almost certainly led Marvell away from publication. No faction escaped Marvell's satirical eye: he criticized and lampooned both the court and parliament. Indeed, had they been published during his lifetime, many of Marvell's more famous poems would have made him rather unpopular with Royalist and republican alike. The Poem In Context – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 37 Summarise this slide.

73 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Marvell spent most of the 1650's working as a tutor. Elected to Parliament in 1660 he became a well-known politician and held office in Cromwell's government. He represented Hull to Parliament during the Restoration of King Charles II to the throne. His very public position, in a time of tremendous political turmoil and upheaval, almost certainly led Marvell away from publication. No faction escaped Marvell's satirical eye: he criticized and lampooned both the court and parliament. Indeed, had they been published during his lifetime, many of Marvell's more famous poems would have made him rather unpopular with Royalist and republican alike. The Poem In Context – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 37 Summarise this slide.

74 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Marvell used his political status to free Milton, who was jailed during the Restoration, and quite possibly saved the elder poet's life. In the early years of his tenure, Marvell made two extraordinary diplomatic journeys: to Holland ( ) and to Russia, Sweden, and Denmark ( ). In 1678, after 18 years in Parliament, Marvell died rather suddenly of a fever. Gossip of the time suggested that the Jesuits (a target of Marvell's satire) had poisoned him. After his death he was remembered as a fierce and loyal patriot. Andrew Marvell ( ), now considered one of the greatest poets of the seventeenth century, published very little of his scathing political satire and complex lyric verse in his lifetime. A collection of Marvell's work did not appear until 1681, three years after his death, when his nephew compiled and found a publisher for Miscellaneous Poems. The circumstances surrounding the publication of the volume aroused some suspicion: a person named "Mary Marvell," who claimed to be Marvell's wife, wrote the preface to the book. "Mary Marvell" was, in fact, Mary Palmer—Marvell's housekeeper—who posed as Marvell's wife, apparently, in order to keep Marvell's small estate from the creditors of his business partners. Her ruse, of course, merely contributes to the mystery that surrounds the life of this great poet The Poem In Context – Andrew Marvel Mini Task 37 Summarise this slide.

75 To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel Assignment To His Coy Mistress is known as a ‘Carpe diem’ poem where the man is trying to persuade the woman to his point of view. In Macbeth Act 1 Sc7 we have the opposite situation as Lady Macbeth tries to persuade her husband to kill the king and seize the throne. In your assignment discuss and compare the methods these two characters use to try to get their own way and ‘seize the day.’ words by Thursday 27 Feb.

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77 Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime We would sit down and think which way To walk and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart. For, Lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate. But at my back I always hear Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave 's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace. Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapt power. Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.


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