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Sir Thomas Wyatt. Lines 1-2 The speaker (hunter) begins the poem by telling other hunters that he knows where to find a hind (female deer); however, he.

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Presentation on theme: "Sir Thomas Wyatt. Lines 1-2 The speaker (hunter) begins the poem by telling other hunters that he knows where to find a hind (female deer); however, he."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sir Thomas Wyatt

2 Lines 1-2 The speaker (hunter) begins the poem by telling other hunters that he knows where to find a hind (female deer); however, he is no longer going to hunt this deer. Lines 3-4: Hunting this deer has been such hard work (vain travail) that the hunter is weary and has fallen into last place in the hunt. Whoso List to Hunt

3 Lines 5-7 Although the hunt has wearied the hunter, he cannot take his mind off of the deer. He still follows in exhaustion. Lines 7-8 The hunter finally decides to stop his hunt because he knows it will be impossible for him to catch the deer. He shows that it is impossible by comparing his hunt to trying a catch wind in a net, an obviously futile action. Whoso List to Hunt

4 Lines 9-10 He assures those other hunters of this deer that they will waste their time just as he has. Lines They cannot catch this deer because she has already been claimed. She wears Caesars collar. Julius Caesars tame deer wore collars inscribed with the phrase Noli me tangere (touch me not). Whoso List to Hunt

5 Line 14 Although this deer seems tame, she is wild. What does this mean? The speaker could be referring to the woman herself – Caesars claim hasnt altered her wildness or fickleness. He could be referring to the risks involved in pursuing her against Caesars wishes. Whoso List to Hunt

6 This poem compares love to hunt. Symbolic Meaning Form – Italian Sonnet Theme – Love is not always attainable. Whoso List to Hunt Character in PoemGeneral MeaningHistorical Meaning HunterA man pursuing a woman Thomas Wyatt DeerThe woman being pursued Anne Boleyn CaesarThe man who already has claim to the woman Henry VIII

7 Edmund Spenser

8 Lines 1-4 The speaker compares his love to ice. She is cold (indifferent to him), and his fire (passion for her) cannot break this indifference. In fact, his fire makes her ice harden. Lines 5-8 The speaker states that his loves coldness does not temper his passion. In fact, his passion intensifies the more indifferent this girls acts. Sonnet 30

9 Lines 9-12 The speaker marvels at this miraculous exchange – that fire can harden ice, and ice can feed fire. How can this be possible? Lines (these lines reveal the theme) Love is powerful. Love is even powerful enough to defy the laws of nature. Sonnet 30

10 Paradox – an apparent contradiction that if somehow true. The paradox that fire can harden ice, and ice can feed fire makes sense given that love is powerful enough to change the laws of nature. Form – Spenserian Sonnet Sonnet 30

11 This poem provides a dialogue, a conversation, between a man and a woman. Lines 1-4 A man writes his loves name in the sand. The waves come in and wash away her name, so he again writes her name in the sand. The waves again wash away her name. Sonnet 75

12 Lines 5-8 The woman finds the mans efforts foolish (vain). She tells him that he cannot immortalize a mortal thing. He cannot keep her name written in the sand forever. She says that like her name was washed away by the waves, she too (her name– her life, existence) will be wiped out (she will die, be forgotten). Sonnet 75

13 Lines 9-12 The man will NOT allow his love to die and be forgotten. Baser (vile, dishonorable) things can do this, but she is much more important. He will make his love famous and eternal, keep her name in the heavens, by writing about her in his verse (poetry). Sonnet 75

14 Lines Even when death conquers the entire world, it will not be able to conquer them or their love because he has kept them alive in his poetry. Eternizing conceit – Submit to my love, and Ill make you famous and even immortal through my writing. Theme – Poetry about love can make love immortal. Form – Spenserian Sonnet Sonnet 75

15 Robert Herrick

16 Stanza 1 The speaker commands virgins (young women) to gather rosebuds now. Why? Time always passes, and tomorrow these beautiful flowers might be withered. Stanza 2 The higher in the sky the sun rises, the closer the day is to ending (nearer hes to setting) Time is always passing. To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time

17 Stanza 3 The best time of life is youth. But when your youth is spent (gone), life is worse. Times always passes. Stanza 4 He commands the young women not to be coy (cold or aloof), but to marry while they are still young. Once they age and lose their beauty, they may lose their chances to marry. To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time

18 Symbolism Rosebuds – opportunities or youth Personification Flowers, Time, sun Form – Lyric Theme – carpe diem : seize the day – Live life to the fullest To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time

19 Andrew Marvell

20 Lines 1-20 If they had all the space and time in the world, this man would not mind his lady acting coy. Space They could wander by the Ganges River in India or the Humber River in England. Time He would love her from ten years prior to the Flood to the Last Judgment. He could spend hundreds or thousands of years praising everything beautiful about her. To His Coy Mistress

21 Lines He always hears time chasing him down and can only anticipate an empty and desert eternity. Because they do not have all the time in the world, he wants this woman to love him now. Lines Once time passes and this woman has died, her beauty and his love will be gone. She will die a virgin. All her honor and all his lust will turn to dust and ashes. None can embrace and love in the grave. To His Coy Mistress

22 Lines 33 – 46 While this woman is young and passionate, the speaker wants them to love fiercely now. To devour their time together To tear our pleasure… Through the iron gates of life They cannot make time stand still, but they can make the most of the time they have. To His Coy Mistress

23 Allusions Flood, conversion of the Jews Personification Time, sun Metaphor Vegetable love Simile the youthful hue / Sits on thy skin like morning dew like amorous birds of prey To His Coy Mistress

24 Form – Lyric Theme – carpe diem : seize the day – Live life to the fullest To His Coy Mistress

25 John Donne

26 Line 1 The speaker begins the poem by stating that Death has no reason to feel proud. The rest of the poem provides the speakers reasoning for this opinion. Lines 1-4 Reason #1: Death is not strong (mighty) or terrifying (dreadful). Why? Death has not actually killed anyone, and Death cannot kill the speaker. Death be not Proud

27 Lines 5-8 Death is not strong (mighty) or terrifying (dreadful). Why? Because rest and sleep give much pleasure and are only pictures of Death, we can expect more pleasure from the actual thing. Death has taken the best men and these men have found rest and relief from pain. Others can expect to find the same in death (and be in good company ). Death be not Proud

28 Lines 9-12 Death is not strong (mighty) or terrifying (dreadful). Why? Death is a slave to other forces (accidents, kings decrees, suicidal men, poison, war, and illness). Opium and magic or hypnotism can make men sleep better than Death can. Lines Reason #2: We will live eternally in the afterlife. There Death has no power; death will die. Death be not Proud

29 Paradox Those dead have not died & Death will die. These paradoxes are explained by the speakers belief in the presence of an afterlife. Theme: The human soul is immortal, and will live on after physical death. Form: Shakespearean sonnet in structure. Italian sonnet in rhyme scheme. Death be not Proud


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