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EXIT Safe Boating Operations & Safety Equipment Basic Course.

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Presentation on theme: "EXIT Safe Boating Operations & Safety Equipment Basic Course."— Presentation transcript:

1 EXIT Safe Boating Operations & Safety Equipment Basic Course

2 EXIT 26 February 2006 Overview This small course will teach small boating regulations for operation on the water and safety equipment that is required to be carried in the vessel. This small course will teach small boating regulations for operation on the water and safety equipment that is required to be carried in the vessel.

3 EXIT 26 February 2006 Application of the Rules Navigation Rules apply - always and without exception - whether you are operating an 8-foot dingy, a 50-foot yacht or a 1,000-foot freighter. Navigation Rules apply - always and without exception - whether you are operating an 8-foot dingy, a 50-foot yacht or a 1,000-foot freighter.

4 EXIT 26 February 2006 Responsibility You, as an operator, are responsible for complying with the Navigation Rules. There is nothing in the rules that frees any vessel, its owner, master or crew from the consequences of neglecting to comply with the rules. You, as an operator, are responsible for complying with the Navigation Rules. There is nothing in the rules that frees any vessel, its owner, master or crew from the consequences of neglecting to comply with the rules. The rules require a vessel to take every precaution to avoid danger and, especially, a collision. The rules require a vessel to take every precaution to avoid danger and, especially, a collision. No vessel has the absolute right-of–way through another vessel. Common sense must prevail even if it means breaking all the rules in order to avoid danger and/or a collision! No vessel has the absolute right-of–way through another vessel. Common sense must prevail even if it means breaking all the rules in order to avoid danger and/or a collision!

5 EXIT 26 February 2006 The Rules There are two (2) sets of Navigation Rules – International and Inland. There are two (2) sets of Navigation Rules – International and Inland. The demarcation line along the coast is clearly marked on your charts. The demarcation line along the coast is clearly marked on your charts. However, this article will only focus on the Inland Rules, which cover harbors, rivers, the Great Lakes and crowded inshore waterways. However, this article will only focus on the Inland Rules, which cover harbors, rivers, the Great Lakes and crowded inshore waterways.

6 EXIT 26 February 2006 Definitions a. Give-way Vessel = The boat that must stay out of the other boat's way and take early and substantial action by altering course or speed. a. Give-way Vessel = The boat that must stay out of the other boat's way and take early and substantial action by altering course or speed. b. Stand-on Vessel = The boat that continues on the same course and speed that it was already on, unless a collision appears imminent. b. Stand-on Vessel = The boat that continues on the same course and speed that it was already on, unless a collision appears imminent.

7 EXIT 26 February 2006 Lights Vessels should all carry a white astern light, green starboard (right side) running light and port (left side) running light. Vessels should all carry a white astern light, green starboard (right side) running light and port (left side) running light. Lights should be on from sun set to sunrise when operating on the water. Lights should be on from sun set to sunrise when operating on the water.

8 EXIT 26 February 2006 Vessel Priority Vessel Priority (your order of importance as a watercraft), in descending order, is as follows: Vessel Priority (your order of importance as a watercraft), in descending order, is as follows: a. A vessel not under command (Example: Loss of steering or power). a. A vessel not under command (Example: Loss of steering or power). b. A vessel restricted in its ability to maneuver (i.e.: Underwater operation such as diving or dredging). b. A vessel restricted in its ability to maneuver (i.e.: Underwater operation such as diving or dredging). c. A vessel constrained by draft (i.e.: A large vessel in a narrow channel). c. A vessel constrained by draft (i.e.: A large vessel in a narrow channel).

9 EXIT 26 February 2006 Vessel Priority Continued Vessel Priority (your order of importance as a watercraft), in descending order, is as follows: Vessel Priority (your order of importance as a watercraft), in descending order, is as follows: d. Fishing or trawling vessels (i.e.: Nets or trawler - remember not trolling!). d. Fishing or trawling vessels (i.e.: Nets or trawler - remember not trolling!). e. Sailboats, meaning: boats under sail ONLY. If a sailboat is using its auxiliary engine, it is a powerboat, even if the sails are up! e. Sailboats, meaning: boats under sail ONLY. If a sailboat is using its auxiliary engine, it is a powerboat, even if the sails are up! f. Power driven. Note that we, power boaters, are at the bottom of the pecking order. f. Power driven. Note that we, power boaters, are at the bottom of the pecking order.

10 EXIT 26 February 2006 Overtaking Overtaking situations: Any boat, including a sailboat, that overtakes (comes up on a boat from behind with the intention of passing) another boat is the Give-way vessel. The boat that is being overtaken is the Stand-on vessel. Overtaking situations: Any boat, including a sailboat, that overtakes (comes up on a boat from behind with the intention of passing) another boat is the Give-way vessel. The boat that is being overtaken is the Stand-on vessel.

11 EXIT 26 February 2006 Overtaking #1 #2 Vessel #1 is being overtaken by vessel #2. Vessel #1 becomes the stand-on vessel, while vessel #2 becomes the give-way vessel.

12 EXIT 26 February 2006 Head On Meeting Head–on: When two (2) powerboats meet bow–to–bow, NEITHER boat is the Stand-on vessel. Both must take avoidance action. Meeting Head–on: When two (2) powerboats meet bow–to–bow, NEITHER boat is the Stand-on vessel. Both must take avoidance action.

13 EXIT 26 February 2006 Head On #1 #2 Vessel #1 and Vessel #2 are in a head on situation. Neither is the stand on vessel. Both vessels must Take action to avoid collision.

14 EXIT 26 February 2006 Crossing (Power) Powerboats Crossing: All powerboats - including sailboats with their engines running - when seeing another vessel crossing on their starboard side, are the Give-way vessel. They are required to take early and substantial action to change course, slow down or back down until the other boat passes. Powerboats Crossing: All powerboats - including sailboats with their engines running - when seeing another vessel crossing on their starboard side, are the Give-way vessel. They are required to take early and substantial action to change course, slow down or back down until the other boat passes. If the Give-way vessel does not respond, the Stand-on vessel should take action to avoid a collision. If the Give-way vessel does not respond, the Stand-on vessel should take action to avoid a collision.

15 EXIT 26 February 2006 Crossing (Power) #1 #2 Green running light Red running light Red running light Green running light In this situation vessel #1 can see the port side of vessel #2. Vessel #2 can see the starboard side of vessel #1. The rule of thumb is green (starboard) means GO, red (port) means STOP Therefore, vessel #2 is the stand-on vessel and has the right of way and vessel #1 is the give way vessel

16 EXIT 26 February 2006 Special Right of Way There is a Right-of-Way Rule that applies only to Western rivers and the Great Lakes. The Right–of–Way is given to vessels down-bound on a river since they have less control than an up-bound vessel has. Both down-bound and up-bound vessels have the right-of-way over crossing vessels. There is a Right-of-Way Rule that applies only to Western rivers and the Great Lakes. The Right–of–Way is given to vessels down-bound on a river since they have less control than an up-bound vessel has. Both down-bound and up-bound vessels have the right-of-way over crossing vessels.

17 EXIT 26 February 2006 Sounds One short blast = I am altering to starboard One short blast = I am altering to starboard One long blast = I am altering to port One long blast = I am altering to port Three short blasts = I am operating astern propulsion (I am going astern) Three short blasts = I am operating astern propulsion (I am going astern) Five short blasts = danger alert Five short blasts = danger alert

18 EXIT 26 February 2006 Safety on the Water It is the unwritten law of the sea that a boaters must help or assist another boater in a time of distress. It is the unwritten law of the sea that a boaters must help or assist another boater in a time of distress.

19 EXIT 26 February 2006 Safety Equipment Canadian Standard Required Equipment American Standard 1. one Canadian-approved personal flotation device or lifejacket of appropriate size for each person on board Personal Protection Equipment Personal Flotation Device (a) One Type I, II, III, or V wearable PFD for each person on board. (must be USCG approved) 2. one buoyant heaving line of not less than 15 m in length Personal Protection Equipment Buoyant Heaving Line 3. one approved lifebuoy with an outside diameter of 610 mm or 762 mm that is attached to a buoyant line of not less than 15 m in length Personal Protection Equipment Lifebuoy (b) In addition to paragraph (a)above, must carry One Type IV (throwable) PFD. 4. a reboarding device if the freeboard of the vessel is greater than 0.5 m Personal Protection Equipment Reboarding Device 5. an anchor with not less than 30 m of cable, rope or chain in any combination Boat safety equipment anchor

20 EXIT 26 February 2006 Safety Equipment Continued Canadian Standard Required Equipment American Standard 6. navigation lights that meet the applicable standards set out in the Collision Regulations Navigation equipment Required to be displayed from sunset to sunrise and in or near areas of reduced visibility. 7. one manual water pump fitted with or accompanied by sufficient hose to enable a person using the pump to pump water from the bilge of the vessel over the side of the vessel Boat safety equipment manual water pump 8. one Class 10BC fire extinguisher, if the pleasure craft is a power driven vessel, plus another class 10BC fire extinguisher if the pleasure craft is equipped with a fuel burning cooking, heating or refrigerating appliance Boat safety equipment fire extinguisher (a) One B-I (when enclosed compartment) (b) One B-II or Two B-I. Note: fixed system equals One B-I 9. a watertight flashlight Distress equipment flashlight see signalling

21 EXIT 26 February 2006 Safety Equipment Continued Canadian Standard Required Equipment American Standard * Canadian approved flares of Type A, B, C or D, not more than 6 of which are of Type D exempt from carrying pyrotechnic distress signals if: operating in a river, canal or lake in which it can at no time be more than one mile from shore; OR engaged in an official competition or in final preparation for an official competition and has no sleeping arrangements. Distress equipment signalling (b) One orange distress flag and One electric distress light - or -Three hand- held or floating orange smoke signals and One electric distress light - or - Three combination (day/night) red flares: hand-held, meteor or parachute type. 11. a sound-signalling device or a sound-signalling appliance Navigation equipment (a) A vessel 39.4 ft must, at a minimum, have some means of making an "efficient" sound signal - (i.e. handheld air horn, athletic whistle - Human voice/ sound not acceptable).

22 EXIT 26 February 2006 Safety Equipment Continued Canadian Standard Required Equipment American Standard 12.Ventilation (a) All vessels built after 25 April 1940 that use gasoline as their fuel with enclosed engine and /or fuel tank compartments must have natural ventilation (at least two ducts fitted with cowls). (b) In addition to paragraph (a), a vessel built after 31 July 1980 must have rated power exhaust blower. 13. Marine Sanitation Device If installed toilet: Vessel must have an operable MSD TypeI, II, or III. 14. one bailer Boat safety equipment bailer

23 EXIT 26 February 2006 Boating Quiz There are 4 short questions to test your knowledge on safe boating rules and equipment safety. There are 4 short questions to test your knowledge on safe boating rules and equipment safety. Take out a piece of paper and pen/pencil. Write down your answers as you go through the questions. Take out a piece of paper and pen/pencil. Write down your answers as you go through the questions. Ready? Lets begin!! Ready? Lets begin!! Good luck! Good luck!

24 EXIT 26 February 2006 Boating Quiz 1. Navigation Rules are established to... a. limit the speed of powerboats. b. reduce the risk of collisions on the water. c. control drinking on the water. d. raise revenue for the government.

25 EXIT 26 February 2006 Boating Quiz 2. The requirement that a boater must help another boater in distress is called the... a. International Safety Code. b. Unwritten Law of the Sea. c. Uniform Rules of Rescue. d. Uniform Code of Maritime Procedures.

26 EXIT 26 February 2006 Boating Quiz 3. Five or more short blasts on a ship's horn are used as a... a. captain's salute. b. signal for going astern. c. signal for leaving your slip. d. danger alert.

27 EXIT 26 February 2006 Boating Quiz 4.The Rules of Good Seamanship say that... a. the stand-on vessel becomes the give-way vessel. b. every action, including breaking all the rules, must be taken to avoid a collision. c. in case of a collision, the stand-on vessel is responsible. d. in case of a collision, the give-way vessel is responsible.

28 EXIT 26 February 2006 Boating Quiz Complete Thank you for taking the time to learn a little about the safe operation of a boat and what safety equipment is important to have in your boat with you at all times. Thank you for taking the time to learn a little about the safe operation of a boat and what safety equipment is important to have in your boat with you at all times. Happy boating!! Happy boating!!

29 EXIT 26 February 2006 Quiz Answers 1 = B 1 = B 2 = B 2 = B 3 = D 3 = D 4 = B 4 = B Hope that you did well. Hope that you did well.


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