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Common Core State Standards K-2: Sharing Text – Literary and Expository In the CCSS Session 2 SNRPDP.

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Presentation on theme: "Common Core State Standards K-2: Sharing Text – Literary and Expository In the CCSS Session 2 SNRPDP."— Presentation transcript:

1 Common Core State Standards K-2: Sharing Text – Literary and Expository In the CCSS Session 2 SNRPDP

2 KindergartenFirst GradeSecond Grade Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts). 7Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events. 7Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. 8(Not applicable to literature)8 8 9With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories. 9Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories. 9Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. 10With prompting and support, read prose and poetry of appropriate complexity for grade 1. 10By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories and poetry, in the grades 2–3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. In a Nutshell: Illustrations, Compare/Contrast, Text Complexity Literary Text Standards CCSS – ELA Standards, p. 11

3 SNRPDP KindergartenFirst GradeSecond Grade Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts). 7Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas. 7Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works) contribute to and clarify a text. 8With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text. 8Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text. 8Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text. 9With prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations,descriptions, or procedures). 9Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures). 9Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. 10With prompting and support, read informational texts appropriately complex for grade 1. 10By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 2–3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. In a Nutshell: Illustrations/Images, Author’s Purpose, Compare/Contrast, Text Complexity Expository Text Standards CCSS – ELA Standards, p. 13

4 Illustrations Hi! Fly Guy! By Tedd Arnold From CCSS K-1 Text Exemplars for Stories Addresses CCSS ELA Standard 7

5 Picture Walk Take a picture walk through Hi! Fly Guy! and make predictions about the story. How did the illustrations help you before reading the story? How did the illustrations help you construct meaning as the story was read to you? How did the illustrations help you after the story was read?

6 Reflection How might the increased emphasis on the importance of illustrations in interpreting and comprehending text impact your instruction. How will illustrations help meet the goal of increasing text complexity? What CCSS number correlates with this activity? Would the standard number differ for literature and informational/expository text?

7 SNRPDP Statements, Questions, and Prompts for teaching these Standards These “Teacher Talk” statements, questions, and prompts address all CCSS for Literature and Informational text in addition to guiding students’ understanding of texts with increased complexity.

8 Teacher Talk: Statements, Questions, and Prompts for Visualizing & Sensory Imaging  Try to imagine the setting. Describe how it looked in your mind.  What pictures came to your mind as you read this page?  As you listen to this story, create a picture in your mind of what you think is happening.  What sounds did you hear as you read?  In my mind’s eye, I imagine _____. How do you think it would look?  What words or phrases did the author use to help you create an image in your mind?  In my head, I can see _____.  Try to picture in your mind someone who would remind you of a character in the story.  I can imagine what it is like to _____. SNRPDP

9 Teacher Talk: Statements, Questions, and Prompts for Synthesizing Now what are you thinking? What is the gist of the story? What parts of this text can you use to create a new idea? Try to verbalize what is happening within the text. I didn’t understand it when the author said _____, but now I understand _____. What new ideas or information do you have? How else could you _____? What do you understand now that you did not understand before? What did you think about first? SNRPDP

10 Teacher Talk: Statements, Questions, and Prompts for Summarizing What was the focus of the reading? What does the author say? Complete the statement, The text is mainly about… What words from the story jump out at you to help you understand the important parts? Can you retell the story only using a few sentences? What clues are within the text? What do you think is the main idea of this story? Which details are the most important? Why? Which details are the least important? Why? SNRPDP

11 Teacher Talk: Statements, Questions, and Prompts for Questioning  What questions do you have about the story after reading it?  Where do you find answers to your questions?  Before you start reading, ask two questions that you would like to find out about the text.  How does asking questions help the reader?  What questions do you hope this story will answer?  While you are reading, try to find the answers to the questions you asked.  What do you understand now because of your questions?  What information do you hope will be in this text?  What questions did you have while you were reading this text? SNRPDP

12 Teacher Talk: Statements, Questions, and Prompts for Previewing The illustrations help me to… What else do you notice from the picture? What is the importance of the title? Maybe the pictures will provide clues about… I noticed that the author… I noticed that the pictures are helping to tell the story because… Are you familiar with the topic? What features help you when previewing the book? The title makes me think the book will be about… SNRPDP

13 Teacher Talk: Statements, Questions, and Prompts for Activating & Building Background Knowledge Read the title or first few pages, and see if you can name a book similar to this one. What do you know that will help you understand the information in this book? Make a connection to other texts written by the same author or books that may be related to the same theme. Based on what you already know about the topic, what questions come to mind? How are the events in the story related to your own experiences? What other stories did this one remind you of? What personal connection did you make with the text? What do you already know about the text? What comes to your mind when you hear the word (or phrase) _____? SNRPDP

14 Teacher Talk: Statements, Questions, and Prompts for Inferring & Drawing Conclusions  I wonder…  What would happen if _____?  What clues did the author give that led to your conclusion?  What details support your conclusion?  What is the story beneath the story?  What does the author want you to realize?  This statement means _____.  How do you think the character feels?  Why do you think that would happen?  I wonder… SNRPDP

15 Teacher Talk: Statements, Questions, and Prompts for Predicting  What do you think the text is going to tell you about? What makes you think so?  Try to imagine what is going on in the story.  Which predictions were confirmed by the text?  Which predictions need to be adjusted or revised?  What will happen next?  Looking at the picture on the cover, what do you think the story will be about?  Which clues from the story did you use to make your prediction?  What makes you think ___ is going to happen? Why?  I wonder if ____; I want to know ____. SNRPDP

16 10 Minute Break SNRPDP

17 Types of Reading Instruction Modeled Reading Guided Reading Shared Reading Independent Reading

18 SNRPDP Whether you are doing modeled, shared, or guided reading, your students will get out of the lesson what you put into it. You must be prepared to teach strategies that help your students become good readers with strong comprehension skills. The three types of reading above address all CCSS for literature and informational text in addition to guiding students’ understanding of texts with increased complexity.

19 SNRPDP

20 Circle Map Activity What comes to mind when you hear the following terms? Modeled Reading Guided Reading Shared Reading Independent Reading Write one statement for each on different post it notes and place them on the appropriate Circle Map. Read what your colleagues have to say.

21 SNRPDP Modeled Reading reading to children…interactive reading developing an interest in, and a love for books playing with and having fun with language responding orally to books and authors connecting to books and authors comparing and contrasting books, authors, and illustrators

22 SNRPDP During Modeled Reading The teacher combines a traditional read aloud with:  Explicit Think Aloud demonstrations of 1.targeted comprehension 2.decoding strategies 3.reading behaviors

23 SNRPDP The Role of the Teacher is: to model the reading process while integrating the three cueing systems—meaning, structure and visual to make thoughtful and purposeful choices for read aloud and strategy instruction to actively model reading behaviors as appropriate to demonstrate strategies for comprehension and word-solving using a variety of print materials, genres and purposes through intentional think-alouds to model reading enjoyment to occasionally use books and materials which students can read independently to gradually release control of strategy use to the students with the expectation that students will approximate and refine strategy use in supported and independent reading

24 SNRPDP The Role of the Student is: to engage with teacher read aloud and think aloud to demonstrate a willingness to approximate and refine strategy use in supported and independent reading to understand that reading is a transactional experience between the reader and the text

25 SNRPDP Shared Reading teacher reading... students can see the print using highly engaging and predictable text kids watching, listening, participating at their level sharing what you know... thinking aloud when reading emphasizing meaning, but teaching skills and strategies using a variety of materials: big books, pocket charts, poems, charts, overheads (or Elmos) extending literature: discussion, art music, drama, writing Teacher and students reading together

26 What is Shared Reading? Teacher and students reading together All students can see the text Different levels of support Teacher modeling reading behaviors Opportunities for various instructional purposes Discussion about how we understand what is read SNRPDP

27 Values of Shared Reading Provides opportunity to model fluent and expressive reading Provides students with the social support of the group Provides appropriate learning experiences in content, concepts, and skills Provides access to English language structure for ELL learners Supports oral language development of learner with special needs SNRPDP

28 Uses of Shared Reading Develop an understanding of phonology and word analysis Demonstrate process of reading Use with individuals, small groups, or whole class Model comprehension strategies SNRPDP

29 Teacher’s Role in Shared Reading Choose appropriate material Point to the text while reading, either word- by-word or line-by-line Read along with the children Read fluently and expressively Select explicit skills for direct instruction Observe responses to guide instruction SNRPDP

30 Materials Needed for Shared Reading Easel, chart stand or overhead projector Pointer Highlighter tape, Wikki Stix, word windows, or overhead marker White board or Magna Doodle Alphabet chart Name chart Word wall SNRPDP

31 Getting Started Identify instructional purpose and choose a passage that supports objective Arrange seating so that all children can see the text Introduce the shared reading. Discuss content, vocabulary, and any skills that may help make the reading more successful Teacher and students read the text together Teacher points to each word or each line, depending on the level of the reader SNRPDP

32 Reread the text Have a discussion about the text Talk about meaning or author’s intent Make one or two teaching points. Highlight portions of text that illustrate the skill using Wikki Stix or highlighter tape Select shared reading from various genres Revisit the shared readings Extend the shared reading to other activities SNRPDP Getting Started (cont.)

33 What does the title mean? This reminds me of… I've heard of this… The title… This author is known for… SNRPDP Discussion Before Shared Reading

34 I predict that this will be about… I predict that the character will… I am surprised by…because… I am confused by… Why didn't the character…. I imagine the character to be like… I've had experiences similar to… I can make a connection to… SNRPDP Discussion During Shared Reading

35 Teaching Points During Shared Reading Alphabetic Principal – Letter recognition – Letter formation – Letter-name correspondence – Letter-sound correspondence – Alphabetic order SNRPDP

36 Concepts About Print (different concepts appropriate for different grade levels) – Directionality – One-to-one matching – Return sweep – Spacing, indentation, paragraph form, charts, and text layout – Concept of first and last parts of words, sentences, and stories – Punctuation, reading the punctuation SNRPDP Teaching Points During Shared Reading

37 Discussion After Shared Reading Students read the text independently They develop an interactive writing They rewrite the text, using interactive editing They use materials in learning centers They make curricular extensions SNRPDP

38 Guided Reading Instructing small groups with patterned/predict able books Matching students with books on their instructional level Teacher leading discussion of book: Before, during, and after Helping kids become fluent, strategic readers Observing students – assessing, & carefully planning lessons Increasing levels of difficulty

39 SNRPDP Student Behavior During Guided Reading Always read the title and the title page Emergent readers should use their index finger to point to the words when reading; more fluent readers may use their finger to “sweep” the lines of print Lay the book flat on the table

40 SNRPDP Guided Reading Groups: Reread their previous guided reading books independently. Teacher should watch and listen to determine the strategies they are using. (Make sure they are pointing to the words as they read. Guide and remind them to use the strategies listed above. They will try to read faster than the kids around them. Strongly discourage this behavior.) When students are finished they should practice their word rings while they wait for the others to finish. Collect previous books and ask the children to put their word rings and bags under their chairs so that you have their full attention. Take out the new book they will be reading. Use one book to talk about the title, author and illustrator. (If you give each child a book, they may be distracted and not follow along. Using one book all together can eliminate distractions.) Discuss what they think the book will be about by looking at the picture on the cover.

41 SNRPDP Guided Reading Group (cont.) Picture walk: Still using one book, take the children through each page. Talk about the pictures that they see. Allow them to point out words that they know in the sentences. Choose a couple unknown words to sound out together. Choral read: Still using one book, point to the words and read the book together. Children should read the word that teacher is pointing to. Model using the reading strategies above as you come to words they don’t know. Hand out the new book to each child. Give them an opportunity to whisper read the book. (Read independently, just loud enough for the teacher to hear.) Teacher should watch and listen to guide the children in using strategies when they don’t know words. (Don’t tell them what the words are, guide them in problem solving and using reading strategies.) Reread the book independently, while they wait for others to finish. Buddy Read: Pair the children up with the person sitting next to them. Take turns reading the book to each other. The child listening should follow along in their own book and assist the child reading when necessary.

42 SNRPDP Independent Reading providing adequate time for practice conducting books talks to stimulate interest providing choice: a variety of genres, lots of books providing opportunities for responses to literature SSR/DEAR reading center friendly book baskets library corner buddy reading

43 Choral Reading Choral reading broadens experiences with different genres Through repeated reading of the text, students become more fluent readers, which allows for increased content comprehension Teachers should choose materials that teach content area subject matter or reading content such as phonics, vocabulary and rhyme As content comprehension increases, texts selected for choral reading should become more complex. SNRPDP

44 Selecting Choral Reading Material Choose material that students can read Look for pieces that will put the students’ imaginations to work Begin with smaller pieces until students are familiar with choral reading procedures Select a poem, song lyric or text from a book that contains words that will come alive when read aloud (Descriptive words, vivid verbs, onomatopoeia, alliteration, and/or rhyming words) Use poems to teach, enrich, or reinforce content across the curriculum - phonics, word families, and vocabulary as well as math, science and social studies SNRPDP

45 Choral Reading Procedures Introduce the selection by reading it aloud while students follow along silently Have everyone read through the selection in unison at least one time Ask different groups of readers to take turns reading lines, stanzas, or paragraphs Group readers into boys and girls, brown eyes and blue eyes, odd number birthdays and even number birthdays, etc. Create different groups so that everyone has a chance to read SNRPDP

46 Use Choral Reading… During pocket chart activities Big books Scholastic News and other periodicals Poetry Cards Whole Group Reading Activities Calendar Time Thematic Poetry

47 SNRPDP How will you use modeled, shared, guided, and independent reading to impact instruction at your school? How will each of these types of reading instruction address the CCSS? Discuss at your tables. Reflection

48 SNRPDP Session Closure Are there any questions or clarifications? Write one or two “A-Ha” moments you had on the “Give One Get One” page. When completed, walk around the room. Give one and get one (share your “A-Ha” moment with a colleague and invite them to share their own). The goal is to fill your boxes before the session end time. Thank you for your participation today!


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